Search results

1 – 10 of over 94000
To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Eleanor Longden, Philip Davis, Janine Carroll, Josie Billington and Peter Kinderman

Although there is a growing evidence base for the value of psychosocial and arts-based strategies for enhancing well-being amongst adults living with dementia, relatively…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is a growing evidence base for the value of psychosocial and arts-based strategies for enhancing well-being amongst adults living with dementia, relatively little attention has been paid to literature-based interventions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of shared reading (SR) groups, a programme developed and implemented by The Reader Organisation, on quality of life for care home residents with mild/moderate dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 individuals were recruited from four care homes, which were randomly assigned to either reading-waiting groups (three months reading, followed by three months no reading) or waiting-reading groups (three months no reading, followed by three months reading). Quality of life was assessed by the DEMQOL-Proxy and psychopathological symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire.

Findings

Compared to the waiting condition, the positive effects of SR on quality of life were demonstrated at the commencement of the reading groups and were maintained once the activity ended. Low levels of baseline symptoms prevented analyses on whether the intervention impacted on the clinical signs of dementia.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included the small sample and lack of control for confounding variables.

Originality/value

The therapeutic potential of reading groups is discussed as a positive and practical intervention for older adults living with dementia.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Josie Billington, Eleanor Longden and Jude Robinson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether Shared Reading (SR), a specific literature-based intervention, is transposable to a prison context and whether mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether Shared Reading (SR), a specific literature-based intervention, is transposable to a prison context and whether mental health benefits identified in other custodial and non-custodial settings were reported by women prisoners.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 35 participants were recruited within an all-female maximum security prison and attended one of two weekly reading groups. Qualitative data were collected through researcher observation of the reading groups; interviews and focus group discussions with participants and prison staff; interviews with the project worker leading the reading groups; and a review of records kept by the latter during group sessions.

Findings

Attendance rates were good, with nearly half of the participants voluntarily present at =60 per cent of sessions. Two intrinsic psychological processes associated with the SR experience were provisionally identified, “memory and continuities” and “mentalisation”, both of which have therapeutic implications for the treatment of conditions like depression and personality disorder.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included the small sample, lack of control for confounding variables, and constraints imposed on data collection by the custodial setting.

Originality/value

Although more controlled research is required, the findings indicate that women prisoners will voluntarily engage with SR if given appropriate support, and that the intervention has potential to augment psychological processes that are associated with increased well-being.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Anne Peoples and Trisha Ward

The purpose of this paper is to describe a major reader development initiative delivered by a cross‐border partnership, involving two public library authorities (one in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a major reader development initiative delivered by a cross‐border partnership, involving two public library authorities (one in Ireland and one in the UK). It aims to outline the strategies and activities developed to support the wider political agenda of building a peaceful and stable society.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an introduction to the context within which the project was developed and an overview of the project delivery. It focuses on the development of project activities to address the peace and reconciliation agenda and draws on the external evaluation report findings.

Findings

The project demonstrates that public libraries are well placed to develop and deliver community‐based programmes to address sensitive and contentious issues, through the provision of reading activities and opportunities for meaningful discussion.

Originality/value

This paper is based on the experience of two public library services, operating in different countries, in communities divided by physical borders and sectarian divisions. It shows how libraries can capitalise on their local presence, and the imaginative space provided by books and reading, to move from their traditional role as a neutral space to a more dynamic role, in which the promotion of reading supports inclusion and diversity.

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sheila Hollins, Jo Egerton and Barry Carpenter

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the social and scientific rationale for book clubs, whose members read wordless books together, and give examples of storytelling…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the social and scientific rationale for book clubs, whose members read wordless books together, and give examples of storytelling with picture books in libraries and other community settings for people with intellectual disabilities and autism.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider the impact of book clubs reading picture books without words, alongside an understanding of the underlying neuroscience (see Table I for search strategy). The authors compare differences in the neuroscience of information and emotion processing between pictures and words. Accounts from book club facilitators illustrate these differences in practice.

Findings

Many readers who struggle with reading and comprehending words, find pictures much easier to understand. Book clubs support community inclusion, as for other people in society. A focus on visual rather than word literacy encourages successful shared reading.

Research limitations/implications

No research has been published about the feasibility and effectiveness of wordless books in community book clubs or shared reading groups. There is very little research on the impact of accessible materials, despite a legal requirement for services to provide reasonable adjustments and the investment of time and resources in developing storylines in pictures, or “translating” information into easy read formats.

Practical implications

Book clubs whose members read picture books without words are growing in number, especially in public libraries in the UK. Expansion is dependent on funding to pay for training for librarians and volunteer facilitators.

Social implications

There is a shortage of fully accessible activities for adults with intellectual disabilities in mainstream community settings with a primarily social purpose.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper describing the theory and impact of wordless book clubs for people who find pictures easier to understand than words.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Lucía I. Méndez

This chapter examines factors impacting vocabulary development in preschool dual language learners, providing a cultural and linguistic perspective on vocabulary…

Abstract

This chapter examines factors impacting vocabulary development in preschool dual language learners, providing a cultural and linguistic perspective on vocabulary instruction in this population. Through a multidisciplinary review of the research literature, instructional strategies that can support vocabulary development in this population are identified. The chapter concludes with a detailed illustration of how these strategies can be incorporated into a culturally linguistically responsive vocabulary approach for Latino preschoolers.

Details

Early Childhood and Special Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-459-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 94000