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Article

Eleanor Longden, Philip Davis, Janine Carroll, Josie Billington and Peter Kinderman

Although there is a growing evidence base for the value of psychosocial and arts-based strategies for enhancing well-being amongst adults living with dementia, relatively…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is a growing evidence base for the value of psychosocial and arts-based strategies for enhancing well-being amongst adults living with dementia, relatively little attention has been paid to literature-based interventions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of shared reading (SR) groups, a programme developed and implemented by The Reader Organisation, on quality of life for care home residents with mild/moderate dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 individuals were recruited from four care homes, which were randomly assigned to either reading-waiting groups (three months reading, followed by three months no reading) or waiting-reading groups (three months no reading, followed by three months reading). Quality of life was assessed by the DEMQOL-Proxy and psychopathological symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire.

Findings

Compared to the waiting condition, the positive effects of SR on quality of life were demonstrated at the commencement of the reading groups and were maintained once the activity ended. Low levels of baseline symptoms prevented analyses on whether the intervention impacted on the clinical signs of dementia.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included the small sample and lack of control for confounding variables.

Originality/value

The therapeutic potential of reading groups is discussed as a positive and practical intervention for older adults living with dementia.

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Article

Joanne Knowles

Have you heard of cognitive stimulation therapy? The London School of Economics (LSE) has carried out research that shows it to be more cost effective than usual care when…

Abstract

Have you heard of cognitive stimulation therapy? The London School of Economics (LSE) has carried out research that shows it to be more cost effective than usual care when looking at the cognitive and quality of life benefits for a dementia sufferer. There is also evidence to suggest that it might be more cost effective than dementia medication, say proponents of this relatively unknown therapy. Joanne Knowles is one such advocate who believes in this therapy so much that she voluntarily campaigns to spread its message.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article

Lauren Thompson and Paul Kingston

With the increase in the development of treatments that aim to improve the symptoms of dementia, more attention is focussed upon the effect that these treatments have on…

Abstract

With the increase in the development of treatments that aim to improve the symptoms of dementia, more attention is focussed upon the effect that these treatments have on the patient's quality of life (QoL). There are specific challenges to be met in measuring the QoL of a patient who is in the later, more severe, stages of dementia. The main challenge to be met is whether the QoL measure can measure QoL in an individual who is unable to provide a subjective report of his or her own QoL. This paper presents five QoL measures that have been designed or used to measure the QoL of patients with severe dementia who are unable to provide self‐reports and to examine whether these measures are a valid and reliable means of assessing QoL in patients with severe dementia. It was found that all of the QoL measures have moderate to good reliability and validity, but the question still remains that without a subjective account, such as a self‐report from the person with dementia, is the outcome of these QoL measures a true reflection of the patient's QoL?

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Laura Booi, Kristine Newman and Piper Jackson

The purpose of this paper is to critically reflect on the global dementia prevention views of the Japanese leaders at both the Japanese Young Leaders in Dementia Event and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically reflect on the global dementia prevention views of the Japanese leaders at both the Japanese Young Leaders in Dementia Event and the Japanese Global Legacy Against Dementia event, from a Canadian perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper undertook a global comparison of the discussion and recommendations from both the Japanese Young Leader Event and the satellite Global Dementia Legacy Event.

Findings

The paper provides insights about the cultural and intergenerational differences in both the Japanese solutions compared to the Canadian solutions.

Originality/value

The authors encourage leaders involved in global prevention dementia discussions to remember the importance of context, in regards to both cultural and intergenerational collaborations, in the search for global dementia solutions.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article

Autumn Edwards, Chad Edwards, Bryan Abendschein, Juliana Espinosa, Jonathan Scherger and Patricia Vander Meer

The purpose of this paper is to interrogate the relationship between self-reported levels of acute stress, perceived social support and interactions with robot animals in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to interrogate the relationship between self-reported levels of acute stress, perceived social support and interactions with robot animals in an academic library. The authors hypothesized that (1) participants would report lower stress and higher positive affect after their interaction with a robot support animal and (2) perceived supportiveness of the robot support animal would positively predict the amount of stress reduction the participants reported.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors hosted a robot petting zoo in the main library at a mid-sized Midwestern university during finals week. Participants were asked to rate their stress level prior to interacting with the robot pets (T1) and then after their interaction they were asked about their current stress level and the perceived supportiveness of the robot animal (T2). Data were analyzed using paired samples t-tests for the pretest and post-test scores.

Findings

The results showed a significant decrease in acute stress between T1 to T2, as well as a significant increase in happiness and relaxation. Participants reported feeling less bored and less tired after their interactions with the robot support animals. The findings also reveal that the degree to which individuals experienced a reduction in stress was influenced by their perceptions of the robot animal's supportiveness. Libraries could consider using robot pet therapy.

Originality/value

This study reveals the benefit of robot support animals to reduce stress and increase happiness of those experiencing acute stress in a library setting. The authors also introduce the concept of socially supportive contact as a type of unidirectional social support.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article

Carlos Peña-Salazar, Francesc Arrufat, Abel Fontanet, Josep Font, Silvia Mas, Pere Roura-Poch and Josep Manel Santos

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relation between quality of life (QoL), mental illness, challenging behaviour and institutionalisation in an adult population…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relation between quality of life (QoL), mental illness, challenging behaviour and institutionalisation in an adult population with intellectual disabilities (ID).

Design/methodology/approach

The study assessed the QoL and its conditioning factors in 142 subjects with different degrees of ID. The GENCAT and Quality of Life in Late Stage Dementia scale were used to evaluate QoL, the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disability and Diagnostic Assessment for the Severely Handicapped-II scale to assess mental illness and the Inventory for Client and aetiology Planning scale to assess challenging behaviour.

Findings

Individuals who live in residential care homes were found to have significantly impaired QoL (<0.001). Individuals with challenging behaviour presented significantly lower QoL, regardless of ID aethiology and degree, while psychiatric disorders did not seem to have a direct influence on individual QoL.

Originality/value

This paper provides new insight into the importance of challenging behaviour and psychiatric disorders in the QoL of individuals with ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article

John Mitchell

Through a literature review, this article aims to identify the needs of those people with dementia who wish to remain at home, and those of their carers. It goes on to…

Abstract

Through a literature review, this article aims to identify the needs of those people with dementia who wish to remain at home, and those of their carers. It goes on to model a range of services that can be linked together to meet these needs comprehensively.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Steve Iliffe and Jane Wilcock

The National Dementia Strategy is a challenge to commissioners of health and local government services to knit a thick pullover out of thin wool. The thick pullover is…

Abstract

The National Dementia Strategy is a challenge to commissioners of health and local government services to knit a thick pullover out of thin wool. The thick pullover is necessary because dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that erodes the capacity of those affected by it, and absorbs increasing resources as it progresses. The thin wool is the limited evidence that investment in new kinds of services will produce benefits for people with dementia and their carers, while being affordable. This paper reviews the scale of the problem of dementia and its likely impact on services in the near future. It discusses some of the key recommendations of the National Dementia Strategy and explores debates about dementia advisors, economic modelling of innovative dementia services and the need for widespread training in the recognition of and response to dementia. Finally, it offers an approach to changing professional practice that is based on adult learning principles and workplace‐based reflective practice.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Caroline Margaret Swarbrick, Elizabeth Sampson and John Keady

The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the ethical and practical dilemmas faced by an experienced researcher in undertaking research with a person with dementia

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the ethical and practical dilemmas faced by an experienced researcher in undertaking research with a person with dementia (whom we have called Amy). Amy died shortly after a period of observation had ended and the family subsequently consented to the data being shared.

Design/methodology/approach

This individual case study presentation was nested within a larger study conducted in England and Scotland between 2013 and 2014. The overall aim of the main study was to investigate how healthcare professionals and informal carers recognised, assessed and managed pain in patients living with dementia in a range of acute settings.

Findings

The presented case study of Amy raises three critical reflection points: (i) Researcher providing care, i.e. the place and positioning of compassion in research observation; (ii) What do the stories mean? i.e. the reframing of Amy's words, gestures and behaviours as (end of) life review, potentially highlights unresolved personal conflicts and reflections on loss; and (iii) Communication is embodied, i.e. the need to move beyond the recording of words to represent lived experience and into more multi-sensory methods of data capture.

Originality/value

Researcher guidance and training about end of life observations in dementia is presently absent in the literature and this case study stimulates debate in a much overlooked area, including the role of ethics committees.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article

Kiara Lewis, Leanne Livsey, Robert J. Naughton and Kim Burton

Exercise has the potential to provide benefits for people living with dementia, yet the balance of evidence is uncertain. This paper aims to provide an evidence synthesis…

Abstract

Purpose

Exercise has the potential to provide benefits for people living with dementia, yet the balance of evidence is uncertain. This paper aims to provide an evidence synthesis to determine whether exercise improves their health and well-being and what exercise should be recommended.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured search for existing literature reviews on exercise for dementia. Relevant articles were selected and critically appraised against systematic criteria. The findings from 15 high quality reviews were collated by using a best evidence synthesis approach.

Findings

The evidence is convincing for improving physical health, promising for cognitive benefits, mixed for psychological benefits and limited for behavioural outcomes. No evidence of harm was found. Overall, exercise can improve physical and mental health for people living with dementia: there is sufficient evidence to recommend multimodal exercise.

Social implications

The potential beneficial outcomes are of significant importance both for people with dementia and their caregivers. In the absence of more specific findings, the current recommendation for older adults in general is pragmatically justified – some activity is better than none, more activity provides greater benefits. Adding social interaction may be important for psychological and behavioural outcomes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to encapsulate the literature to date on exercise for dementia. Combining the findings from previous reviews enabled a novel synthesis across the range of relevant interventions and outcomes.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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