Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Wei Wu, Rui Yao and Zuoxu Xie

This paper aims to take Chinese university teachers as the research objects to examine their self-evaluation of online teaching and analyze the main factors influencing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to take Chinese university teachers as the research objects to examine their self-evaluation of online teaching and analyze the main factors influencing their evaluation during COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

According to the theory of educational ecology, the factors influencing teachers' self-evaluation of online teaching in this paper include university background, courses background and teachers' personal background from the macro- to micro-levels. Through exploratory factor analysis, independent sample T-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the self-evaluation of online teaching of 13,997 teachers from 334 universities and their relationship with teachers' background have been subject to data statistics and analysis.

Findings

Teachers' self-evaluation of online teaching mainly includes three dimensions: online teaching methods, online teacher–student interaction and online teaching techniques. There are significant differences in these three dimensions among teachers with different background characteristics, including regions, the types of universities, the nature of universities in macro background levels, the types and numbers of online courses in meso background levels, and the gender, years of teaching, professional titles and disciplines in micro background levels.

Practical implications

To improve teachers' self-evaluation of online teaching, it is suggested to build an online teaching self-evaluation system for teachers, strengthen university support and guarantee, strengthen online teaching training and improve the information accomplishments of teachers.

Originality/value

This large-scale empirical survey of online teaching evaluation of Chinese teachers can provide scholars with a deeper understanding of the implementation of online teaching in China and the self-evaluation of online teaching by teachers.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Abstract

Details

A Developmental and Negotiated Approach to School Self-Evaluation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-704-7

Abstract

Details

A Developmental and Negotiated Approach to School Self-Evaluation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-704-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Baek‐Kyoo (Brian) Joo, Hea Jun Yoon and Chang‐Wook Jeung

The purpose of this study is to examine the joint effects of employees’ core self‐evaluations and perceived transformational leadership of their supervisors on employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the joint effects of employees’ core self‐evaluations and perceived transformational leadership of their supervisors on employees’ affective commitment to the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were drawn from a Fortune Global 500 company in Korea. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to explain the variance in organizational commitment.

Findings

Core self‐evaluations and transformational leadership positively influenced employees’ organizational commitment. In terms of effect size, organizational commitment was more related to transformational leadership than core self‐evaluations. As for transformational leadership, employees exhibited the highest organizational commitment when their leaders articulated the vision, promoted group goals, and provided intellectual stimulation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of this study is likely restricted to a certain group with similar demographic characteristics (e.g. male junior managers with relatively high education levels). This study, like most organizational commitment studies, relied on self‐reported and cross‐sectional survey method.

Practical implications

Since core self‐evaluations tend to be stable over time, HR professionals need to recruit and select those with higher core self‐evaluations. HR/OD professionals can help managers change their leadership in a transformative fashion (vision articulation, group goal promotion, and intellectual stimulation) by providing relevant training programs and developmental relationships such as coaching and mentoring.

Originality/value

This study took an integrative approach that encompasses personal and contextual factors in a study. It found not only a significant relationship between core self‐evaluations and organizational commitment, but also the interaction effects of core self‐evaluations and one of the dimensions of transformational leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Baek-Kyoo Joo and Sung Jun Jo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the perceived authentic leadership of supervisors and employees’ core self-evaluations on their organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the perceived authentic leadership of supervisors and employees’ core self-evaluations on their organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and to examine the role of psychological empowerment as a partial mediator of those relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was used to obtain individual perceptions from employees working in one of the biggest companies in Korea. Data from 374 samples was analyzed. Construct validity of each measurement model is examined using confirmatory factor analysis and the hypothesized structural model is tested by structural equation modeling.

Findings

The authors found that perceived authentic leadership, core self-evaluation, and employees’ psychological empowerment had significant impact on employees’ OCB, accounting for 58 percent of the variance in OCB. In addition, 54 percent of the variance in psychological empowerment was explained by authentic leadership and core self-evaluations, partially mediating the relationship between authentic leadership and OCB and the relationship between core self-evaluations and OCB.

Originality/value

Positivity is instrumental in driving intrinsic motivation for work and voluntary devotion to colleagues and organizations. This study contributed to the emerging research branch of management and organizational psychology such as positive organization scholarship and positive organizational behavior by exploring the relationship among the relevant constructs. More specifically, the authors found that positive contextual factor (i.e. authentic leadership), positive personality factor (i.e. core self-evaluations), and positive work experience (i.e. psychological empowerment) do have positive influence on employees’ extra-role performance (i.e. OCB).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Zakarya A. Alzamil

In Saudi Arabia, technical education is managed by Technical and Vocational Training Corporation. However, there is no independent accrediting body to accredit the…

Abstract

Purpose

In Saudi Arabia, technical education is managed by Technical and Vocational Training Corporation. However, there is no independent accrediting body to accredit the technical institutes and assure its quality, which causes the lack of unified quality assurance standards and manageable quality improvement processes. The purpose of this paper is to propose self-evaluation standards to help the technical institutes to evaluate their performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has used a brainstorming technique of local practitioners in quality assurance. Such technique was performed by adopting DACUM that stands for “Developing A CurriculUM”. The author has used a heuristic educational and training process as the foundation of the standards and processes development, namely; curriculum, environment, training managements, and instructors. A team has been established that has been trained locally and abroad on the quality assurance standards and processes. The team studied several quality frameworks of the different countries to come up with guidelines for quality self-evaluation and standards.

Findings

The author has found that such an approach is a very effective tool for improving the institutes' performance and gives them the flexibility to decide about their missions. Most of institutes' staff is reluctant to participate in the self-evaluation process because of the fear it may reveal their weaknesses, but with encouragement and motivation especially from the top management they tend to participate in such a process. Self-evaluation helps the educational institutes to be benchmarked with other international institutions, in which good practices may be adopted by the institutes' managements to achieve their vision.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed approach can help the technical education institutes to manage their quality system. In addition, the implementation of such an approach might be the starting point to develop a quality system framework for the technical education in Saudi Arabia. However, further investigation is needed to measure whether applying such standards may help the technical education institutes to meet the required quality standards to attain an accreditation from the international quality agencies.

Originality/value

The proposed guidelines for quality standards and processes is a contribution in the accreditation and quality assurance processes for many public and private institutions in Saudi Arabia. In addition, it is an important step to standardize the quality processes.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Cláudia S. Sarrico, Maria J. Rosa and Maria J. Manatos

The literature is very rich in its discussion on how to measure school performance, but there are still a number of gaps to investigate in relation to the determinants of…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature is very rich in its discussion on how to measure school performance, but there are still a number of gaps to investigate in relation to the determinants of that performance, especially at the level of school performance management practices. The purpose of the paper is to understand better performance management practices in schools and how they may relate to school achievement.

Design/methodology/approach

Frequently, the performance of schools is evaluated using solely output measures: especially exam classifications, but also progression rates, completion rates and wastage rates. Previously, a value‐added approach was used to quantitatively evaluate Portuguese secondary schools beyond output results. From the results of this exercise, a sample of schools with different levels of observed performance was chosen. In‐depth case studies of the sample of schools were undertaken to gather an understanding of their performance management practices, taking Bouckaert and Halligan's framework of analysis.

Findings

Self‐evaluation and performance management are not well developed in schools. Most schools monitor exam results, progression and completion rates. However, they do not seem to do it in a formal and systematic way, and find it difficult to understand the reasons for the results obtained. Incorporation of performance measures into performance management is incipient, and most acknowledge the difficulty of going from measurement of results to improvement actions. Few can demonstrate that improvement actions have resulted from self‐evaluation and very few evaluate improvement actions' results. There seems to be an agreement that the external evaluation of schools has prompted the development of self‐evaluation.

Originality/value

This is a study at the meso level of analysis of public sector performance, that of state education. The study contributes to a better understanding of performance management in Portuguese secondary schools. More generally, it investigates the usefulness of the Bouckaert and Halligan framework to assess progress in performance management and whether that will lead to progress in performance itself.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 61 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

A Developmental and Negotiated Approach to School Self-Evaluation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-704-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Jon L. Pierce and Donald G. Gardner

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical relationships between core self‐evaluations, perceived job characteristics, and organization‐based self‐esteem.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical relationships between core self‐evaluations, perceived job characteristics, and organization‐based self‐esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

A total 236 employees of a large US‐based mining company were surveyed using well‐established measures of core self‐evaluations, perceived job characteristics, and organization‐based self‐esteem.

Findings

Correlation and regression analyses support the hypotheses that core self‐evaluations and perceived job characteristics jointly relate to organization‐based self‐esteem.

Research limitations/implications

This is a non‐experimental field study and as such inferences about causality are limited.

Practical implications

The development of organization‐based self‐esteem is beneficial to both employers and employees. Managers need to consider both the personality of employees and employees' work experiences in trying to enhance organization‐based self‐esteem.

Originality/value

This is the first study to simultaneously study the relationships of personality and perceived job characteristics with organization‐based self‐esteem.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Denise Rodríguez, Hendrik Van Landeghem, Virginia Lasio and Dirk Buyens

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the situational and dispositional determinants of job satisfaction in environments created by implementing employee-supportive lean.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the situational and dispositional determinants of job satisfaction in environments created by implementing employee-supportive lean.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a questionnaire to measure the determinants of job satisfaction (perceived job demands, perceived job autonomy and core self-evaluations) and job satisfaction. Afterwards, the paper proposes a conceptual framework and uses hierarchical multiple regression to test the relationships among perceived job demands, perceived job autonomy, core self-evaluations and job satisfaction. Additionally, the study describes the implementation of employee-supportive lean in four small companies using an action research approach.

Findings

The findings reveal that perceived job demands has a negative impact on job satisfaction. In addition, the authors find that perceived job autonomy and core self-evaluations have a positive impact on job satisfaction. Finally, the results show that core self-evaluations buffer the impact of perceived job demands on job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The present research underscores the importance of work and personal characteristics for employees’ job satisfaction in an environment created by implementing employee-supportive lean.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000