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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Heidi Ellise Collins and Santina Bertone

The purpose of this paper is to explore changes in the identity constructions of expatriate accompanying spouses, as experienced throughout their first year of adjustment to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore changes in the identity constructions of expatriate accompanying spouses, as experienced throughout their first year of adjustment to living in Sarawak, Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Using interview data collected longitudinally throughout ten participants’ first year of living in Malaysia, changes observed in participants’ adjustment narratives over time form the basis of an analysis of successful and unsuccessful cases of identity adjustment.

Findings

An international relocation presents varying degrees of threat or challenge to expatriate spouses’ central identities. The degree of threat posed will predict the amount of redefinition of social, role, and personal identities required for successful adjustment across social, cultural, and personal domains. Men experienced threats to their career/worker identity, whereas women faced multiple threats to identities such as mother, wife/partner, child, and also their career/worker identity.

Research limitations/implications

Results of this small-n research may not be generalisable, but do offer new interpretations of adjustment processes, including potential gender differences. The usefulness of longitudinal narrative inquiry for exploring experience of change is highlighted.

Practical implications

Conversations about identity constructions should be held with expatriate spouses in order to support relocation decision making, and to customise support programmes. Governments wanting to attract and retain foreign talent should consider policies that address employment options for spouses, which will allow for the continuation of central career identities.

Originality/value

Longitudinal case study analysis results in new interpretations of the adjustment experiences of expatriate spouses over time.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Joe Pagnoccolo and Santina Bertone

This research explores the training experiences of Australian apprentices in the workplace with a focus on workplace relationships and their link to interpersonal attributes and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the training experiences of Australian apprentices in the workplace with a focus on workplace relationships and their link to interpersonal attributes and people-related generic skills among apprentices.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research is conducted, and the authors analysed interview data from 20 apprentices (17 men, three women; average age 25 years) who came from a range of industries and trade sectors.

Findings

These findings revealed common themes around the importance of communication, emotional direct cognition, self-awareness and teamwork during training on the job. This suggests that interpersonal attributes are central to apprentices' practices within their training experiences.

Research limitations/implications

The findings indicate a need for greater emphasis on the development of interpersonal attributes in training both on the job and within training packages.

Practical implications

The paper extends the literature on the role of interpersonal skills in the apprentice experience, presents information about young people's challenges in training and points to further investigations needed to explore this phenomenon.

Originality/value

An authentic detailed account is presented of apprentices' interpersonal attributes and people-related generic skills in their training experiences.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2023

Marian Crowley–Henry, Shamika Almeida, Santina Bertone and Asanka Gunasekara

Skilled migrants' careers are heterogeneous, with existing theories capturing only some of their diversity and dynamic development over time and circumstance. This paper aims to…

1685

Abstract

Purpose

Skilled migrants' careers are heterogeneous, with existing theories capturing only some of their diversity and dynamic development over time and circumstance. This paper aims to draw out the multilevel (macro, meso and micro levels) influences impacting skilled migrants' careers by using the lens of the intelligent career framework. Furthermore, structuration theory captures the agency of skilled migrants facing different social structures at and across levels and explains the idiosyncratic nature of skilled migrants' careers.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an abductive approach, this paper examines the career influences for a sample of 41 skilled migrants in three different host countries. Individual career stories were collected through qualitative interviews. Important career influences from these narratives are categorised across the intelligent career competencies (knowing why, how and whom) at the macro, meso and micro levels.

Findings

Findings illustrate the lived reality for skilled migrants of these interrelated multilevel career influences and go some way in elucidating the heterogeneity of skilled migrants' careers and outcomes. The interplay of individual agency in responding to both facilitating and challenging social structures across the multilevels further explains the idiosyncratic nature of skilled migrants' careers and how/whether they achieve satisfying career outcomes. Some potential policy implications and options arising from these findings are suggested.

Originality/value

By considering multilevel themes that influence skilled migrants' career capital, the authors were able to better explain the complex, relational and idiosyncratic shaping of their individual careers. As such, the framework informs and guides individuals, practitioners and organisations seeking to facilitate skilled migrants' careers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Barry O'Mahony, Elena Verezub, John Dalrymple and Santina Bertone

Achieving quality standards in postgraduate education, particularly among Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students, can be challenging. In addition to the diverse educational and…

Abstract

Purpose

Achieving quality standards in postgraduate education, particularly among Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students, can be challenging. In addition to the diverse educational and cultural backgrounds of these students, thesis writing frequently involves the development of new skills associated with the comprehension of a large volume of information, critical analysis and the development of an academic writing style. Many students need support in one or all of these key areas. Universities currently provide a number of different writing support activities to address students' needs. The purpose of this study is to report on a writing support intervention that employed a specialist in academic writing to support HDR students in the business faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a two‐year period, the intervention was evaluated to assess the appropriateness and effectiveness of this support using qualitative methods. The results of this study are presented and discussed from different angles. First, a lecturer in academic writing support outlines her observations and reflection on the value of individual consultations and students' progress. Second, the attitudes and experience of students and their supervisors to this service are discussed. This is followed by the faculty senior management view with regard to the effectiveness and efficiency of this service.

Findings

This research found that both students and their supervisors expressed satisfaction with the service offered. Also it was found that the writing quality of submitted theses is improving; the costs of thesis editing have reduced; HDR students appear to be more satisfied with and confident of their academic writing; the attractiveness of the PhD program has been enhanced, as judged by the increase in PhD enquiries and the quality of potential applicants.

Research limitations/implications

The results reported here indicate that the intervention was successful. However, the sample size was relatively small and the HDR candidates and supervisors were drawn from only one faculty in one university.

Practical implications

The study provides some recommendations that could be taken into account by senior management and academic staff in order to set up and deliver a faculty‐based writing support service for HDR students, which would bring benefits to students, their supervisors, faculties and universities.

Originality/value

The value of this research is that the writing program was proven to be beneficial for universities to support research students in the development of their writing skills, which in turn, could improve the quality of thesis and ensure on time completion.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Santina Bertone and Sanjeev Abeynayake

(1) Critically analyze the role of diversity and inclusion practitioners and the legal/policy framework for managing diversity and inclusion in Australia. (2) Propose enhanced…

Abstract

Aims

(1) Critically analyze the role of diversity and inclusion practitioners and the legal/policy framework for managing diversity and inclusion in Australia. (2) Propose enhanced framework to improve outcomes for disadvantaged groups in the workforce.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Review of international and Australian literature, overview of gains and continuing gaps for disadvantaged groups, and consideration of the features of work health and safety (Robens-style) legislation that could be adapted to the diversity and inclusion jurisdiction.

Findings

The role of diversity and inclusion practitioner is often transient and fragmented, offering a limited base to advance the diversity and inclusion cause. Based on indicators, much more work is required to achieve full diversity and inclusion. A stronger legislative/policy framework is needed to increase the effectiveness and longevity of the diversity and inclusion practitioner role, spread responsibility, and achieve improved outcomes.

Research Limitations

A lack of qualitative data from workplaces to augment our understanding of the challenges encountered by diversity and inclusion practitioners. To date, there has been no opportunity to test the feasibility of Robens-style legislation/policy in this area.

Practical Implications

Opportunity to develop a fully worked proposal for legislative/policy reform to present to the government, employers, professional associations, trade unions, and representatives of disadvantaged groups.

Social Implications

Reforms could have far-reaching implications for the regulation and administration of diversity and inclusion practice in Australia

Originality

Critical review of the diversity and inclusion practitioner role and associated legislation/policy in Australia and consideration of an alternative framework for diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

115

Abstract

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Jan Selmer

912

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Martin Davies

161

Abstract

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Andri Georgiadou, Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez and Miguel R. Olivas-Luján

The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the research presented in this edited volume.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the research presented in this edited volume.

Design/Methodology

This report is based on 17 chapters, which vary in terms of research approach, design, and method, yet aims to present different country perspectives on diversity within diversity management.

Findings

The chapters present new insights on how the national and macro-social environment impacts the institutional approaches to diversity management across the world. Findings indicate the need for organizations to focus on deep-level diversity, rather than choosing a tick-box policy on surface-level diversity. Empirical studies reveal that every institution can adopt a diversity-friendly approach in a way that best fits their structure, culture and the mentality of their top management team.

Originality

The report summarizes and integrates novel insights on country perspectives and approaches on diversity management.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Abstract

Details

Diversity within Diversity Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-821-3

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