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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Saggi Nevo and InduShobha Chengalur-Smith

Our knowledge of why organizations continue to use open source software (OSS) infrastructure technologies is relatively limited, and existing models appear inadequate to…

Abstract

Purpose

Our knowledge of why organizations continue to use open source software (OSS) infrastructure technologies is relatively limited, and existing models appear inadequate to explain this continuance phenomenon given that they are set at the individual level and also do not take into account the unique characteristics of OSS. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an institutional perspective, this paper posits that coercive (business value of IT) and normative (open source ideology (IDEO)) factors may be credited with sustaining the continued use of OSS technologies. The study argues that organizations that subscribe to IDEO are more likely to continue using OSS technologies. Survey data are collected from organizations that have implemented an OSS infrastructure technology and a moderated multiple regression analysis is performed to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

In addition to the business value provided by OSS technologies, adherence to IDEO also impacts decisions to continue using those technologies. The results suggest that once an OSS is implemented in an organization, IDEO can enhance organizations’ intentions to continue using such technologies, directly, as well as indirectly, by amplifying the impact of the perceived business value of the technology.

Originality/value

Much of extant literature on continued use focuses on end-user technologies. This paper is one of the first to focus on infrastructure technologies and examine organizations’ intentions to continue using those technologies by developing a parsimonious theory-driven model for examining organizations’ continued use intentions toward infrastructure IT. Additionally, much of open source research to date has been inwardly focused, and this paper is one of few empirical studies to focus on the demand or consumption side of OSS technologies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Henry M. Kim and Saggi Nevo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the risks associated with online voting and to compare them with more traditional voting modes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the risks associated with online voting and to compare them with more traditional voting modes.

Design/methodology/approach

A modified version of the Operationally Critical Threat, Asset, and Vulnerability Evaluation (OCTAVE) approach from the CERT Coordination Center® at Carnegie‐Mellon University is used for developing a framework for comparing threats for different stakeholders. In addition, these risks and threats are quantified, offering an opportunity to conduct a multi‐mode risk analysis in a manner independent of the underlying voting modes. The framework is exemplified using data from officials who had been involved in an actual municipal election, in which registered voters were given the option of voting through the Internet.

Findings

What is instructive in the context of this study is that the “low‐tech” threats such as large‐scale mail theft of election notifications and family member coercion may in fact be significant for Internet voting, and the sensationalized threats mentioned by the media may pale in comparison in terms of vulnerabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions drawn from applying the methods may be very sensitive to parameters chosen for quantification, especially since estimates of probabilities of threats may vary in order of magnitude.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates a quantitative and comparative analysis for Internet voting, something which does not seem to be adequately addressed in the literature.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Murad Moqbel, Saggi Nevo and Ned Kock

There is considerable debate among academics and business practitioners on the value of the use of social networking by organizational members. Some, fearing presenteeism…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is considerable debate among academics and business practitioners on the value of the use of social networking by organizational members. Some, fearing presenteeism (i.e. being at the workplace but working below peak capacity), claim that the use of social networking sites by organizational members is a waste of time, while others believe it leads to improvements in job performance, partly due to employees’ successful efforts to balance work‐life realms. This paper aims to inform this debate by examining the use of social networking sites by organizational members and its effect on job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploratory study is based on a survey of 193 employees, focusing on the following constructs: social networking site use intensity, perceived job satisfaction, perceived organizational commitment, and job performance. The authors’ proposed model was evaluated using variance‐based structural equation modeling (SEM), a latent variable‐based multivariate technique enabling concurrent estimation of structural and measurement models under nonparametric assumptions. This study used WarpPLS 2.0 to assess both the measurement and the structural model.

Findings

The results show that social networking site use intensity has a significant positive effect on job performance through the mediation of job satisfaction, and that this mediating effect is itself mediated – in a nested way – via organizational commitment. The findings suggest that social networking site use, rather than causing presenteeism, may be a new way through which employees balance their work‐life realms, in turn benefitting their organizations.Originality/value – To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to analyze, in an integrated way, the relationship between those theoretical constructs.

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Mauricius Munhoz de Medeiros and Antônio Carlos Gastaud Maçada

In the digital age, the use of data and analytical capabilities to guide business decisions and operations plays a strategic role for organizations to gain competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

In the digital age, the use of data and analytical capabilities to guide business decisions and operations plays a strategic role for organizations to gain competitive advantage (CA). However, the paths by which analytical capabilities convey their effect to CA are not yet fully known and few studies address the role of behavioral and cultural aspects of related of analytical capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how data-driven culture (DDC) and business analytics (BA) affect CA, considering the mediating effects of big data visualization (BDV) and organizational agility (OA).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with 173 managers who are BDV and BA users in Brazilian organizations of various economic segments. The data were analyzed through structural equation modeling and mediation tests.

Findings

The evidence indicates that DDC and BDV are antecedents of BA. The following complementary mediations were discovered: BDV in the relationship between DDC and BA; BA in the relationship between DDC and CA; and OA in the relationship between BA and CA. It was also discovered that OA explains the transmission of most of the effect of BA to CA.

Practical implications

This study can help organizations to understand the importance of cultural and behavioral aspects related to the use of the analytical capabilities. Thereby, managers can establish policies and strategies to extract value from data and leverage business agility and competitiveness through use BDV and BA.

Originality/value

This study fills an important research gap by developing an original research model and discussing empirical evidence on how DDC and BA affect CA, considering the mediating effects of BDV and OA.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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