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Article

Tobias Klatt, Marten Schlaefke and Klaus Moeller

Over the past few years, developments in business analytics have provided strategic planners with promising instruments for dealing with turbulent environments. This study

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past few years, developments in business analytics have provided strategic planners with promising instruments for dealing with turbulent environments. This study aims to reveal whether or not the application of business analytics in strategic planning contributes to better company performance, and to formulate recommendations on how to integrate business analytics in companies' performance management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey conducted with 89 respondents from high‐technology firms, a group comparison between firms with strong performance and those with weak performance reveals significant differences between the two groups' strategic planning processes and application of business analytics.

Findings

The empirical survey's results show that better‐performing companies are characterized by a more sophisticated analytical planning process. Lower‐performing firms acknowledge this competitive advantage. Based on these findings, the authors develop recommendations on how to integrate business analytics in performance management contexts.

Research limitations

The empirical study's results are limited to high‐technology industries in the cultural setting of Germany.

Practical implications

The empirical results emphasize the competitive advantage gained by applying business analytics. The recommendations concerning analytical performance management should help managers to sensibly integrate the analytical toolbox in performance management contexts.

Originality/value

This paper combines insights on the best usage of business analytics from the perspective of strategic planning experts, with recommendations for the integration of business analytics into the performance management framework from an academic perspective.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Hashim Zameer, Ying Wang, Humaira Yasmeen and Shujaat Mubarak

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of business analytics and environmental orientation toward green innovation and green competitive advantage. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of business analytics and environmental orientation toward green innovation and green competitive advantage. In addition, the study aims to explore the mediating role of green innovation in the impact of business analytics and environmental orientation on green competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon the theoretical analysis of existing literature, several hypotheses have been developed. Data was gathered using a survey method. The survey was conducted using online portal, 388 valid responses have been processed using SPSS 23.0 and AMOS 23.0 for empirical analysis. Two steps were used, first reliability and validity have been measured. Following this, the authors employed structural equation modeling technique to test hypothetical relationships.

Findings

The results from the authors’ empirical analysis indicate that business analytics and environmental orientation have a pivotal role toward green innovation as well as green competitive advantage. If the results are seen comparatively, then it can be indicated that the role of business analytics is more powerful compared with the environmental orientation. Although environmental orientation is a key factor of green innovation, but its direct role toward green competitive advantage is not so strong. Similarly, to check the other mechanisms, the role of green innovation as a mediator was explored. Empirical findings have established the mediating role of green innovation in the influence of business analytics and environmental orientation on green competitive advantage. Thus, the results confirm a mechanism of green innovation in the impact of business analytics and environmental orientation on green competitive advantage.

Practical implications

The study captures the attention of decision-makers and highlights that business leaders need to emphasize on business analytics while making managerial decisions related to green innovation and green competitive advantage.

Originality/value

For the first time, this study explored the role of business analytics and environmental orientation together toward green innovation and green competitive advantage. The study adds value to the existing literature and opens new avenues for scholarly research in the area of managerial decision-making.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Soraya Sedkaoui

The rise of big data and analytics companies has significantly changed the business playground. Big data and the use of data analytics are being adopted more frequently…

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of big data and analytics companies has significantly changed the business playground. Big data and the use of data analytics are being adopted more frequently, especially in companies that are looking for new methods to develop smarter capabilities and tackle challenges in the dynamic processes. Working with big data and applying a series of data analysis techniques require strong multidisciplinary skills and knowledge of statistics, econometrics, computer science, data mining, law and business ethics, etc. Higher education institutions (HEIs) are concerned by this phenomenon which is also changing learning needs and require a reorientation toward the development of novel approaches and advancements in their programs. The purpose of this paper is to introduce and define big data analytics as having an immense potential for generating value for businesses. In this context, one prominent strategy is to integrate big data analytics in educational programs to enrich student’ understanding of the role of big data, especially those who want to explore their entrepreneurial ways and improve their effectiveness. So, the main purpose of this article consists, on the one hand, in why HEIs must carefully think about how to provide powerful learning tools and open a new entrepreneurship area in this field, and, why, on the other hand, future entrepreneurs (students) have to use data analytics and how they can integrate, operationally, analytics methods to extract value and enhance their professional capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has established an expert viewpoint to discuss the notion of data analytics, identify new ways and re-think what really is new, for both entrepreneurs and HEIs, in the area of big data. This study provides insights into how students can improve their skills and develop new business models through the use of IT tools and by providing the ability to analyze data. This can be possible by bringing the tool of analytics into the higher educational learning system. New analytics methods have to help find new ways to process data and make more intelligent decisions. A brief overview of data analytics and its roles in the context of entrepreneurship and the rise of data entrepreneur is then presented. The paper also outlines the role of educational programs in helping address big data challenges and transform possibilities into opportunities. The key factors of implementing an efficient big data analytics in learning programs, to better orientate and guide students’ project idea, are also explored. The paper concludes with suggestions for further research and limitations of the study.

Findings

The findings in this paper suggest that analytics can be of crucial importance for student entrepreneurial practice if correctly aligned with their business processes and learning needs and can also lead to significant improvement in their performance and quality of the decisions they make. The added value of big data is the ability to identify useful data and turn it into usable information by identifying patterns and exploiting new algorithms, tools and new project solutions. So, the move toward the introduction of big data and analytics tools in higher education addresses how this new opportunity can be operationalized.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations to this research paper. The research findings have significant implications for HEIs in the field of analytics (mathematics and computer science), and thus, it is not generalizable with any further context. Also, the viewpoint is centered on the data analytics process as a value generator for entrepreneurial opportunities.

Originality/value

This research can be considered as a contribution with literature about educational quality, entrepreneurship and big data analytics. This study describes that new analytics thinking and computational skills are needed for the newer generation of entrepreneurs to handle the challenges of big data. But, preparing them to capture, analyze, store and manage the large amounts of data available today – so they can see value in data – is not just about implementing and using new technologies. This is also, about, a dynamic, operational and modern educational learning process from which a student can extract the maximum benefit. In another words: How to make new opportunities from these data? Which data to select for the analysis? and How to efficiently apply analytical techniques to generate value?

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Content available
Article

Thuy Duong Oesterreich and Frank Teuteberg

In recent years, the rise of big data has led to an obvious shift in the competence profile expected from the controller and management accountant (MA). Among others…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, the rise of big data has led to an obvious shift in the competence profile expected from the controller and management accountant (MA). Among others, business analytics competences and information technology skills are considered a “must have” capability for the controlling and MA profession. As it still remains unclear if these requirements can be fulfilled by today’s employees, the purpose of this study is to examine the supply of business analytics competences in the current competence profiles of controlling professionals in an attempt to answer the question whether or not a skills gap exists.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a set of 2,331 member profiles of German controlling professionals extracted from the business social network XING, a text analytics approach is conducted to discover patterns out of the semi-structured data. In doing so, the second purpose of this study is to encourage researchers and practitioners to integrate and advance big data analytics as a method of inquiry into their research process.

Findings

Apart from the mediating role of gender, company size and other variables, the results indicate that the current competence profiles of the controller do not comply with the recent requirements towards business analytics competences. However, the answer to the question whether a skills gap exist must be made cautiously by taking into account the specific organizational context such as level of IT adoption or the degree of job specialization.

Research limitations/implications

Guided by the resource-based view of the firm, organizational theory and social cognitive theory, an explanatory model is developed that helps to explain the apparent skills gap, and thus, to enhance the understanding towards the rationales behind the observed findings. One major limitation to be mentioned is that the data sample integrated into this study is restricted to member profiles of German controlling professionals from foremost large companies.

Originality/value

The insights provided in this study extend the ongoing debate in accounting literature and business media on the skills changes of the controlling and MA profession in the big data era. The originality of this study lies in its explicit attempt to integrate recent advances in data analytics to explore the self-reported competence supplies of controlling professionals based on a comprehensive set of semi-structured data. A theoretically founded explanatory model is proposed that integrates empirically validated findings from extant research across various disciplines.

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Article

Steen Nielsen

This paper aims to identify, discuss and provide suggestions for how the phenomenon of business analytics and its elements may influence management accounting and the accountant.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify, discuss and provide suggestions for how the phenomenon of business analytics and its elements may influence management accounting and the accountant.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper not only identifies a number of studies from academic journals but also reports from professional consultancies and professional accounting bodies concerning future opportunities and implications for management accounting in combination with business analytics.

Findings

First, it was found that both academic articles and professional accounting bodies suggest changes for management accounting. Second, it shows that topics such holistic views, fact-based decisions, predictions, visualization and specific hard core skills are the most important for the accountant. Finally, the paper demonstrates that there are different ambition levels for the management accountant, depending on if s(he) wants to be on a descriptive, on a predictive or on a prescriptive level.

Originality/value

Even though the paper is general in nature, the paper discusses a phenomenon that for some reason has been ignored by practitioners and researchers. The true value of the paper therefore lies in making practitioners and researchers more aware of the possibilities of business analytics for management accounting, and through that, making the management accountant a real value driver for the company.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article

Morteza Namvar, Ali Intezari and Ghiyoung Im

Business analytics (BA) has been a breakthrough technological development in recent years. Although scholars have suggested several solutions in using these technologies…

Abstract

Purpose

Business analytics (BA) has been a breakthrough technological development in recent years. Although scholars have suggested several solutions in using these technologies to facilitate decision-making, there are as of yet limited studies on how analysts, in practice, improve decision makers' understanding of business environments. This study uses sensemaking theory and proposes a model of how data analysts generate analytical outcomes to improve decision makers' understanding of the business environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an interpretive field study with thematic analysis. The authors conducted 32 interviews with data analysts and consultants in Australia and New Zealand. The authors then applied thematic analysis to the collected data.

Findings

The thematic analysis discovered four main sensegiving activities, including data integration, trustworthiness analysis, appropriateness analysis and alternative selection. The proposed model demonstrates how these activities support the properties of sensemaking and result in improved decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides strong empirical evidence for the theory development and practice of sensemaking. It brings together two distinct fields – sensemaking and business analytics – and demonstrates how the approaches advocated by these two fields could improve analytics applications. The findings also propose theoretical implications for information system development (ISD).

Practical implications

This study demonstrates how data analysts could use analytical tools and social mechanisms to improve decision makers' understanding of the business environment.

Originality/value

This study is the first known empirical study to conceptualize the theory of sensemaking in the context of BA and propose a model for analytical sensegiving in organizations.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article

Rawan Enad Al-Qaralleh and Tarik Atan

The emergence of the knowledge economy and Industry 4.0 has prompted many firms to invest considerable resources into knowledge-based human resource management (HRM…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of the knowledge economy and Industry 4.0 has prompted many firms to invest considerable resources into knowledge-based human resource management (HRM) practices and business analytics capabilities aimed at enhancing competitiveness. This paper aims to propose a conceptual model that examines the collective effects of knowledge-based HRM practices, business analytics capabilities and organizational agility on innovative performance using knowledge-based theory as a theoretical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study empirically tested the above-said idea by surveying (n = 182) individuals with supervisory capacity in Jordanian 4- and 5-star hotels. The obtained data was analyzed using linear modeling and fuzzy sets (fsQCA) techniques.

Findings

Results from linear modeling revealed that knowledge-based HRM practices, business analytics and organizational agility are important antecedents for innovative performance. Conversely, findings from fsQCA revealed that organizational agility is a necessary and sufficient condition to achieve high innovative performance. While business analytics is a sufficient condition to achieve high innovative performance.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to unveil the linear and complimentary effects of knowledge-based HRM practices, business analytics capabilities and organizational agility on innovative performance. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article

Kevin Daniel André Carillo

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the inadequacies of current business education in the tackling of the educational challenges inherent to the advent of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the inadequacies of current business education in the tackling of the educational challenges inherent to the advent of a data-driven business world. It presents an analysis of the implications of digitization and more specifically big data analytics (BDA) and data science (DS) on organizations with a special emphasis on decision-making processes and the function of managers. It argues that business schools and other educational institutions have well responded to the need to train future data scientists but have rather disregarded the question of effectively preparing future managers for the new data-driven business era.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach involves analysis and review of the literature.

Findings

The development of analytics skills shall not pertain to data scientists only, it must rather become an organizational cultural component shared among all employees and more specifically among decision makers: managers. In the data-driven business era, managers turn into manager-scientists who shall possess skills at the crossroad of data management, analytical/modeling techniques and tools, and business. However, the multidisciplinary nature of big data analytics and data science (BDADS) seems to collide with the dominant “functional silo design” that characterizes business schools. The scope and breadth of the radical digitally enabled change, the author are facing, may necessitate a global questioning about the nature and structure of business education.

Research limitations/implications

For the sake of transparency and clarity, academia and the industry must join forces to standardize the meaning of the terms surrounding big data. BDA/DS training programs, courses, and curricula shall be organized in such a way that students shall interact with an array of specialists providing them a broad enough picture of the big data landscape. The multidisciplinary nature of analytics and DS necessitates to revisit pedagogical models by developing experiential learning and implementing a spiral-shaped pedagogical approach. The attention of scholars is needed as there exists an array of unexplored research territories. This investigation will help bridge the gap between education and the industry.

Practical implications

The findings will help practitioners understand the educational challenges triggered by the advent of the data-driven business era. The implications will also help develop effective trainings and pedagogical strategies that are better suited to prepare future professionals for the new data-driven business world.

Originality/value

By demonstrating how the advent of a data-driven business era is impacting the function and role of managers, the paper initiates a debate revolving around the question about how business schools and higher education shall evolve to better tackle the educational challenges associated with BDADS training. Elements of response and recommendations are then provided.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article

Sjoerd van den Heuvel and Tanya Bondarouk

Driven by the rapidly accelerating pace of technology-enabled developments within human resource management (HRM), human resource (HR) analytics is infiltrating the…

Abstract

Purpose

Driven by the rapidly accelerating pace of technology-enabled developments within human resource management (HRM), human resource (HR) analytics is infiltrating the research and business agenda. As one of the first in its field, the purpose of this paper is to explore what the future of HR analytics might look like.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 20 practitioners of HR analytics, based in 11 large Dutch organizations, the authors investigated what the application, value, structure, and system support of HR analytics might look like in 2025.

Findings

The findings suggest that, by 2025, HR analytics will have become an established discipline, will have a proven impact on business outcomes, and will have a strong influence in operational and strategic decision making. Furthermore, the development of HR analytics will be characterized by integration, with data and IT infrastructure integrated across disciplines and even across organizational boundaries. Moreover, the HR analytics function may very well be subsumed in a central analytics function – transcending individual disciplines such as marketing, finance, and HRM.

Practical implications

The results of the research imply that HR analytics, as a separate function, department, or team, may very well cease to exist, even before it reaches maturity.

Originality/value

Empirical research on HR analytics is scarce, and studies on scenarios, values, and structures of expected developments in HR analytics are non-existent. This research intends to contribute to a better understanding of the development of HR analytics, to facilitate business and HR leaders in taking informed decisions on investing in the further development of the HR analytics discipline. Such investments may lead to an enhanced HR analytics capability within organizations, and cultivate the fact-based and data-driven culture that many organizations and leaders try to pursue.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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Article

Kevin Daniel André Carillo, Nadine Galy, Cameron Guthrie and Anne Vanhems

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the need to engender a positive attitude toward business analytics in order for firms to more effectively transform into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the need to engender a positive attitude toward business analytics in order for firms to more effectively transform into data-driven businesses, and for business schools to better prepare future managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops and validates a measurement instrument that captures the attitude toward business statistics, the foundation of business analytics. A multi-stage approach is implemented and the validation is conducted with a sample of 311 students from a business school.

Findings

The instrument has strong psychometric properties. It is designed so that it can be easily extrapolated to professional contexts and extended to the entire domain of business analytics.

Research limitations/implications

As the advent of a data-driven business world will impact the way organizations function and the way individuals think, work, communicate and interact, it is crucial to engage a transdisciplinary dialogue among domains that have the expertise to help train and transform current and future professionals.

Practical implications

The contribution provides educators and organizations with a means to measure and monitor attitudes toward statistics, the most anxiogenic component of business analytics. This is a first step in monitoring and developing an analytics mindset in both managers and students.

Originality/value

By demonstrating how the advent of the data-driven business era is transforming the DNA and functioning of organizations, this paper highlights the key importance of changing managers’ and all employees’ (to a lesser extent) mindset and way of thinking.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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