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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Diane A. Lawong, Gerald R. Ferris, Wayne A. Hochwarter and John N. Harris

Work environments, which are widely acknowledged to exert strong influences on employee attitudes and behavior, have been studied since the initiation of formal work entities…

Abstract

Work environments, which are widely acknowledged to exert strong influences on employee attitudes and behavior, have been studied since the initiation of formal work entities. Over this time, scholars have identified myriad impactful internal and external factors. Absent though are investigations examining economic downturns despite their acknowledged pervasiveness and destructive effects on worker performance and well-being. To address this theoretical gap, a multistage model acknowledging the impact of recessions on workplace responses, response effects, and environmental considerations is proposed. Inherent in this discussion is the role of economic decline on reactive change processes, the nature of work, and the structure and design of organizations. These significant changes affect employee attitudes and behaviors in ways that increase the political nature of these work environments. Organizational factors and employee responses to heightened recession-driven politics are discussed. Additionally, theoretically relevant intervening variables capable of influencing work outcomes are described. The chapter is concluded by discussing the implications of this theoretical framework as well as directions for future research.

Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Jill E. Ellingson and Kristina B. Tirol-Carmody

Self-report questionnaires are the predominant method used in human resource management (HRM) research to assess employees’ work-related psychological constructs (e.g., processes

Abstract

Self-report questionnaires are the predominant method used in human resource management (HRM) research to assess employees’ work-related psychological constructs (e.g., processes, states, and attributes). However, this method is associated with significant shortcomings, including the introduction of self-serving bias and common method variance when used exclusively. In this chapter, the authors challenge the assumption that individuals themselves are the only accurate source of the self-focused information collected in HRM research. Instead, the authors propose that other-ratings – ratings of a target individual that are provided by a workplace observer, such as a coworker, supervisor, or subordinate – can accurately assess commonly measured work-related psychological constructs. The authors begin by explaining the advantages of other-ratings for HRM research and practice, reviewing the history of other-ratings and how they emerged in the personality and person-perception literature, and outlining how they have been used in HRM research to date. Then, the authors build upon Funder’s (1995) realistic accuracy model to develop a theoretical argument detailing why workplace others should be able to accurately judge how another employee thinks and feels about work. Next, the authors highlight existing evidence in the literature on the accuracy of other-ratings and present the results of a preliminary meta-analysis on the ability of other-ratings to predict self-ratings of work-related psychological constructs. Finally, the authors discuss potential moderators of other-rating accuracy and reflect on a number of practical considerations for researchers looking to use other-ratings in their own work. The authors intend for this chapter to meaningfully contribute to the larger conversation on HRM research methods. Other-ratings are a simple, yet powerful, addition to the methodological toolkit of HRM researchers that can increase flexibility in research design and improve the overall quality of research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Chris Fitch, Sarah Hamilton, Paul Bassett and Ryan Davey

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence on the extent to which personal debt impacts on mental health, and mental health on personal debt.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence on the extent to which personal debt impacts on mental health, and mental health on personal debt.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper systematically reviews the English‐language, peer‐reviewed literature, 1980‐2009, drawing on 14 databases across the medical, business, legal, and social science fields.

Findings

From 39,333 potential papers identified, 39,283 were excluded, and 50 were reviewed using a narrative analysis approach. Among nine longitudinal studies, three controlled for psychiatric morbidity or psychological wellbeing at baseline, income/wealth, and other socio‐economic variables. From these, two reported indebtedness or an increase in debt levels associated with subsequently poorer mental health, while one study found no such relationship. While methodological limitations make it difficult to definitively demonstrate whether indebtedness causes poorer mental health, plausible data exist which indicate that indebtedness may contribute to the development of mental health problems, and mediate accepted relationships between poverty, low income, and mental disorder.

Research limitations/implications

Existing research either uses definitions of “debt” which lack specificity, or definitions of “mental health” which are too broad‐brushed. A more sensitive set of core questions is needed. Further longitudinal research is also a key priority.

Practical implications

Those working with people with debt problems need to be aware of the potential risk of reduced mental wellbeing or mental disorder.

Originality/value

The mental health of individuals living with indebtedness has become a recent concern for the health and financial services sectors. However, no systematic reviews have so far been conducted.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 February 2023

Paula Martins Nunes, Teresa Proença and Mauro Enrique Carozzo-Todaro

No systematic review has previously been dedicated to comprehensively investigate predictors of well-being and ill-being in working contexts. Empirical studies have vastly…

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Abstract

Purpose

No systematic review has previously been dedicated to comprehensively investigate predictors of well-being and ill-being in working contexts. Empirical studies have vastly associated well-being as the result of autonomous motivation and basic psychological needs satisfaction, while frustration results in ill-being. The purpose of this study is to integrate the variables identified in empirical studies associated with the occurrence of the phenomena, individual/organizational features and consequences associated with workers' well-being/ill-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This systematic review includes 44 empirical studies published up to February 2021. Findings are summarized based on quantitative analysis of the evidence.

Findings

Results reinforce the role of self-determined motivation and needs satisfaction in promoting well-being, while amotivation and needs frustration led to ill-being. Besides, they indicate that ill-being can both lead to negative consequences and diminish positive work outcomes. Findings also revealed that: integrated motivation does not seem to be empirically distinct from intrinsic and identified motivation in promoting well-being; introjected motivated behaviors may be less harmful to psychological health than externally oriented ones; the relationship between external motivation and well-being/ill-being requires prospective investigations; and amotivation seems to have a detrimental effect in workers' psychological health.

Practical implications

Results provide practical information for HRM practitioners to design work environments and practices that promote employees' psychological health.

Originality/value

An unprecedented framework that aggregates empirical findings regarding the antecedents, predictors and consequences of ill-being/well-being in working contexts is presented.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2023

Alexander Davidson, Mark R. Gleim, Catherine M. Johnson and Jennifer L. Stevens

The unique employment status of gig workers as independent contractors and their impact on consumers provide an important opportunity for the current research to understand gig…

Abstract

Purpose

The unique employment status of gig workers as independent contractors and their impact on consumers provide an important opportunity for the current research to understand gig workers' perceptions of their employment and how that affects job performance outcomes. These gig workers serve as the frontline service providers for platforms like Airbnb hosts, Lyft drivers and Wag walkers performing customer-facing services. However, their status as gig workers, not traditional employees, presents challenges to platforms. The purpose of this research is to gain insights into the profiles of gig workers, examine the challenges platforms have in retaining high-performing workers and provide a research agenda on this important group of frontline service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

Incorporating variables deemed important in examining self-determination theory, a large-scale data collection via an online survey was administered, yielding 447 completed surveys. A two-step cluster analysis procedure was conducted to categorize sample respondents into four distinct groups.

Findings

Four groups emerged from the cluster analysis, labeled “Ambivalent Outsider,” “Competent Cog,” “Independent Insider” and “Committed Comrade.” The results suggest that there are significant differences across all variables and groups based on gig worker responses and self-reported customer satisfaction scores. The gig worker profiles developed are then utilized to formulate research propositions that are the basis for the research agenda presented.

Practical implications

The goal of many collaborative consumption platforms may be to hire Independent Insiders or Committed Comrades; however, that is difficult to attain with every hire. Thus, the segmentation results provide insights for companies seeking to hire, retain, and successfully motivate their workforce.

Originality/value

Given the freedom and flexibility afforded to gig workers, and the importance they have on the service experience for customers, understanding their own perceptions of employment and performance is critical to ensuring a positive experience for all parties. Research on collaborative consumption has largely focused on consumers or the management of freelance workers with only tangential applicability to gig work. This paper offers a comprehensive research agenda for gig worker management based on the typology of gig workers created.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Steven W. Rayburn

The purpose of this article is to employ Self-Determination Theory to explain the mediated impact of work design – empowerment and serial and investiture socialization – on…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to employ Self-Determination Theory to explain the mediated impact of work design – empowerment and serial and investiture socialization – on employee work affect. The theory proposes fulfilment of three psychological needs – autonomy, competence, and relatedness – will mediate individuals' ability to achieve contextually relevant well-being. An empirical study tests this claim and exposes the structure of the mediating effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses were collected from a sample of 239 front-line service employees using snowball data collection. SEM was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

Findings suggest that empowerment and serial and investiture socialization are significantly differentially related to need fulfilment. Additionally, all forms of need fulfilment do not directly influence employee affect. Instead, there are both direct and interactive effects that work simultaneously to influence employees' positive work affect.

Practical implications

This study exposes specific work design levers managers can manipulate to benefit employees. This research highlights the different effects of specific work design variables on employee work affect.

Originality/value

This paper extends understanding of Self-Determination Theory by exposing the direct and interactive effects of need fulfilment on work affect for service workers. Also, it delivers a deeper exploration of the impact of work design on employees by modelling multiple work design variables as well as process variables simultaneously to provide a more detailed picture of how work design influences employee work affect.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Sohni Siddiqui, Naureen Nazar Soomro and Martin Thomas

In this study, researchers applied blended learning program to investigate the success of a blended learning program on satisfaction of the psychological needs, and academic…

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Abstract

Purpose

In this study, researchers applied blended learning program to investigate the success of a blended learning program on satisfaction of the psychological needs, and academic achievement of chemistry students of O-Levels, following curriculum prescribed by University of Cambridge.

Design/methodology/approach

Research pattern is quantitative aligned with the quasi-experimental and pre-post experimental design which aimed at examining the efficiency of a motivational strategies adopted with the use of blended learning program on psychological needs satisfaction (competence, autonomy, and relatedness) and achievement in chemistry O-Levels Syllabus, at the end of the research program.

Findings

Hypothesis testing represented that use of blended learning program has significant and positive impact on academic achievements through the mediation of autonomy. Results also revealed the substantial association of blended learning on other psychological needs (i.e., competence and relatedness); however, the competence and relatedness have no effect on academic achievements in this study. Thus, research concludes that providing an autonomous environment in substitution of the controlled environment promotes learning and produces positive outcomes.

Originality/value

Blended learning or use of Learning Management Systems is being commonly used mostly in the tertiary level of studies; however, blended learning with secondary classes especially in the field of chemistry is yet not studied in detail. Similarly, the usefulness of the motivational strategies to learn chemistry is observed with university-level students, but very rare data about encouraging students at the secondary level have been gathered. Therefore, the researcher designed this blended learning program to enhance students’ motivation towards achievements in secondary chemistry.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Leila Afshari and Paul Gibson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between transactional leadership and willing organizational commitment in two significantly different organizations (one…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between transactional leadership and willing organizational commitment in two significantly different organizations (one from the healthcare sector and one from manufacturing).

Design/methodology/approach

Partial Least Squares was used to develop a mediation model explaining the underlying mechanism between contingent reward leadership and willing organizational commitment.

Findings

The data indicates that, as expected, the relationship between transactional leadership and willing commitment in the manufacturing organization was mediated by both competence and relatedness; however, in the healthcare organization, to the surprise, this relationship was mediated by competence only.

Practical implications

The authors develop a model that could help organizational managers and consultants improve the productivity and effectiveness of their work by taking the findings into account.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on the effectiveness of transformational research: this paper is one of the first to explore the relationship between transactional leadership and willing organizational commitment, taking into account the mediation effect of psychological need satisfaction.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Lenna V. Shulga and James A. Busser

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects value…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects value co-creation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-determination theory (SDT) need-based motivational factors were operationalized in co-creation as commitment to resources (autonomy), feedback (competence) and collectives (relatedness). A between–within factorial experimental design (3 × 2 × 4) was conducted using online scenarios depicting value co-creation in a destination resort setting. Respondents were randomly and equally assigned to strong and weak SDT factor conditions. Next, they were exposed to scenarios depicting four types of value co-creation: co-innovation, co-creation of marketing, co-creation of experience and co-recovery, followed by an assessment of their co-created value (CCV), well-being, satisfaction and service advantage perceptions.

Findings

Results revealed that overall strong SDT conditions produce better outcomes. Consumers’ relatedness showed the strongest difference between strong and weak SDT conditions on the CCV dimensions. Further analysis revealed that autonomy and relatedness are crucial for collaboration. CCV meaningfulness is central for customers to improve their well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage perceptions through co-creation.

Originality/value

The study contributes to a line of research on successful voluntary value co-creation processes between consumers and a company. The integration of service-dominant logic (SDL), axiology of value (AOV) and SDT, uniquely operationalized as commitment to resources as autonomy, feedback as competence and co-creation collective as relatedness offers a better understanding of how customers appraise the dimensions of CCV and outcomes of well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Fabian Groven, Gaby Odekerken-Schröder, Sandra Zwakhalen and Jan Hamers

This paper aims to explore how tensions and alignments between different actors’ needs in a transformative services network affect balanced centricity, which is an indicator of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how tensions and alignments between different actors’ needs in a transformative services network affect balanced centricity, which is an indicator of well-being. Balanced centricity describes a situation in which all network actors’ interests and needs are fulfilled simultaneously. In such cases, all actors are better off, which increases both individual actors’ and overall actor-network well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study takes place in nursing homes in which in-bed baths represent co-created service encounters that affect the well-being of focal actors (i.e. patients), frontline service employees (i.e. nurses) and transformative service mediators (i.e. family members), who have potentially competing needs. Using a qualitative, phenomenological approach, the study inductively explores and deductively categorizes actors’ personal experiences to gain deep, holistic insights into the service network and its complex web of actor interdependencies.

Findings

The resulting conceptual model of balanced centricity identifies actors’ lower-order needs as different manifestations of the psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness. If actors’ needs are aligned, their psychological needs can be satisfied, which facilitates balanced centricity. If actors exhibit competing needs though, balanced centricity is impeded.

Practical implications

This study establishes actors’ psychological needs as the origin of tensions/alignments in multi-actor networks that impede/contribute to balanced centricity. Transformative service providers should try to address all actors’ psychological needs when co-creating services to achieve network well-being.

Originality/value

This study adopts a novel, multi-actor perspective and thereby presents a conceptual model that contributes to the understanding of balanced centricity. Future research could test this model in other transformative service settings.

1 – 10 of 232