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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Ruby Roy Dholakia

In a very personal reflection, this paper aims to trace the academic trajectory of a female marketing academic in a very male-dominated discipline. It also highlights the…

Abstract

Purpose

In a very personal reflection, this paper aims to trace the academic trajectory of a female marketing academic in a very male-dominated discipline. It also highlights the struggle balancing work and family, as well as protecting an immigrant identity in a foreign culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the period and unique conditions of the author’s academic journey, this highly personal retrospective account is based on recall of significant events that have shaped my singular experience. It attempts to capture the experience of an immigrant female novice navigating not only a foreign culture but also a very male-dominant discipline.

Findings

While times have changed and gender barriers are lower today, challenges remain. In addition, the set of choices faced by women with partners in the same discipline differ significantly and complicate the family-work balance decisions. There is no one set of path that can be followed.

Practical implications

While there is a professional cost to deviating from the mainstream, pursuing alternatives to the dominant topics is vital to advancing the health and relevance of the marketing discipline. The relationships between marketing and development have been an important topic for me; however, these macromarketing topics continue to be neglected. Given the current socio-economic-political conditions globally, perhaps future marketing scholars will devote greater attention to these topics.

Originality/value

This is purely the author’s personal reflection of a journey that began accidentally. It also occurred in the 1970s when women were rare in the business world, particularly business academia. It offers a retrospective comparison to male peers who, aside from their individual talents and history (Belk, 2017; Firat, 2014; Holbrook, 2017), were achieving their professional goals at a similar period. It also provides some historical context that can be compared to experiences of other female pioneers in marketing academia and marketing practice (Bolton, 2017; Tadajewski and Maclaran, 2013; Zeithaml, 2017).

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Mark Tadajewski and D.G. Brian Jones

Abstract

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2019

Nikhilesh Dholakia

The purpose of this paper is to trace the personal and intellectual evolution of the author via an autobiographic approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the personal and intellectual evolution of the author via an autobiographic approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal, reflective, interpretive, historical narrative.

Findings

For the author, the writing of this paper opened new and reflective windows on personal and intellectual evolution, and similar effects may happen with some of the readers.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the critical directions suggested herein could possibly inspire innovative critical marketing work.

Practical implications

There may be some insights on how to blend observations of the world at large with critical theories gleaned from the literature.

Social implications

The paper offers reflections of the unequal, unjust state of the world, and this could inspire others to seek innovative ameliorative pathways.

Originality/value

As an autobiographical narrative, this paper – by definition – is original and unique.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Ruby Roy Dholakia and Outi Uusitalo

The shift from physical (brick and mortar) stores and hard copy catalog stores toward electronic stores (e‐tailing) may be seen as a continuous innovation building on past…

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11732

Abstract

The shift from physical (brick and mortar) stores and hard copy catalog stores toward electronic stores (e‐tailing) may be seen as a continuous innovation building on past changes brought about by in‐home shopping methods such as catalog, TV and direct mail. Why are e‐tailers then having such difficulty retaining their customers? In this paper, we examine the influence of consumer characteristics on perception of shopping benefits associated with electronic and physical shopping. Based on a mail survey of upscale US households, the empirical study finds the two shopping formats to be clearly different from each other in terms of perceived shopping benefits. The data supports the influence of individual characteristics (such as age, household income and family composition) as well as past behaviors on the shopping benefits associated with the two modes of shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Ruby Roy Dholakia and Meera Venkatraman

Argues that in today′s competitive marketplace, service providershave to compete with goods marketers in addition to other serviceproviders in contexts where different…

Abstract

Argues that in today′s competitive marketplace, service providers have to compete with goods marketers in addition to other service providers in contexts where different brands of tangible goods serve as substitutes for services. Examines various mixed choice sets composed of goods and services alternatives. Describes various kinds of mixed choice sets and lists various factors that transform them. Draws implications for service providers for dealing with choice sets differing in the market position of services vis á vis goods alternatives.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Ruby Roy Dholakia

Going shopping is a major source of relaxation as well as a household chore. Associated with females, the activity is under pressure due to time constraints, changing…

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20694

Abstract

Going shopping is a major source of relaxation as well as a household chore. Associated with females, the activity is under pressure due to time constraints, changing social roles and technological advances. In this paper, the impact of changing social pressures on going shopping is examined among married households. Key constructs are sex and shopping context which determine shopping responsibility among household members. Based on a large scale survey that included statistically viable numbers of male as well as female respondents, the study finds a great deal of consensus regarding shopping responsibility among the sampled households. Although men are playing a significant role in shopping activities, particularly shopping for household groceries, shopping remains a gendered activity but it is not a pleasureless activity. We conclude that the supermarket is likely to be the retail setting where the changing roles will make the greatest impact.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Jingyi Duan and Ruby Roy Dholakia

The purpose of the present research is to investigate how consumers’ purchase posting behavior on social media influences their own happiness.

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4561

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present research is to investigate how consumers’ purchase posting behavior on social media influences their own happiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents three studies. Study 1 was an experiment that manipulated purchase and posting behavior. Studies 2 and 3 utilized surveys which asked participants to report their actual purchases and posting behaviors. Data were examined using regression and bootstrap mediation analysis.

Findings

Posting purchases on social media has a positive influence on consumers’ happiness through the mediating roles of perceived impact of purchases on self and interpersonal relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the research on social media by demonstrating that because of its remarkable characteristics, posting purchases on social media significantly increases consumers’ happiness. It fills the research gap of how word-of-mouth and conspicuous consumption influences the storyteller’s happiness. It is also the first research which suggests that user-generated content of purchases actually can be a new carrier of conspicuous consumption. The findings shed light on the substantial influences of posting purchases on the use/consumption stage of consumer behavior.

Practical implications

Because posting purchases on social media increases consumers’ happiness, marketers can develop strategies to encourage consumers to post about their purchases more.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first to demonstrate the positive effect of social media purchase posting on consumers’ happiness and identify the mechanism under which this effect occurs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Syagnik (Sy) Banerjee and Ruby Roy Dholakia

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differential effects of location‐based mobile advertisements on men and women in work leisure situations.

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3574

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the differential effects of location‐based mobile advertisements on men and women in work leisure situations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducted was in a scenario based experimental design in the 2×2×2 ANOVA format. Independent variables included: Type of locations (private/public); Situations (work/leisure); and Gender (male/female). Dependent variables included Perceptions and Behavioural intentions.

Findings

Recent findings often indicate that men are more receptive to location‐based ads (LBA) than women. However, in this paper the authors show that in some circumstances women are more favourable to the same mobile LBAs than men because both women's and men's reactions depend on specific location and task situations.

Practical implications

Based on these findings, managers will be able to better target ads to specific genders in different locations and situations, thus maximizing the relevance of the ads, click through rates and affect cost per thousand impressions.

Originality/value

There has been little research on how men versus women react to LBAs based on their orientation towards different situations at hand. This research illustrates what differences exist in their perceptions of LBA and why.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Ruby Roy Dholakia and Miao Zhao

Since web sites are collection of several features, this paper examines web site interactivity – objective and subjective – at the feature level in terms of three…

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4622

Abstract

Purpose

Since web sites are collection of several features, this paper examines web site interactivity – objective and subjective – at the feature level in terms of three underlying dimensions. The purpose of this paper is to understand the distinction between objective and subjective interactivity and to investigate their effects on customer satisfaction, behavioral intention, and telepresence.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental approach is used to study online shopping behavior from two retail web sites created to represent high and low interactivity. Student subjects, recruited from US universities, are given a task to purchase a product/gift certificate within a given budget. Analysis of variance and Lisrel are used to analyze the effects of interactivity.

Findings

Empirical results support objective and subjective interactivity as distinct constructs and while both positively impact online shoppers' satisfaction and behavioral intentions, only subjective interactivity influences telepresence. The Lisrel analysis also indicates that telepresence directly affects behavioral intentions and satisfaction does not fully mediate its impact.

Research limitations/implications

The direct relationships between objective and subjective interactivity is not examined in this paper and this relationship is likely to be more complex in the external world than can be included in an experimental setting. However, by being able to design each web site feature along the three dimensions of interactivity, it is possible to more effectively demonstrate the impact of objective and subjective interactivity as well as the merits of feature‐level interactivity.

Practical implications

If interactivity is viewed only at the overall level, then it is difficult to decide how to build an interactive web site. By employing the underlying theoretical dimensions of interactivity at the feature level, this paper addresses challenges faced in the design of web sites, particularly issues regarding whether and how to make a feature interactive.

Originality/value

Despite the growing attention to interactivity, there is limited understanding of its influences and impacts. The distinction between objective and subjective interactivity is able to shed deeper insights into the relationship between interactivity and satisfaction. This is one of the first such studies to investigate the effects of interactivity on telepresence, satisfaction, and behavioral intentions, key outcome measures in online retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Ruby Roy Dholakia and Miao Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to identify website characteristics that affect customer evaluations and satisfaction with online stores at two interaction points – when the…

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11878

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify website characteristics that affect customer evaluations and satisfaction with online stores at two interaction points – when the order is placed and after the order has been fulfilled.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected by bizrate.com, data collected from customers of thousands of online stores, the analysis focuses on the changes in the relationships between website characteristics and customer ratings. Data for two‐time periods, 15 months apart, are used to determine the stability in the observed relationships.

Findings

Order fulfillment variables, particularly on‐time delivery, dominate the effects on overall customer evaluations and satisfaction. The statistical significance of other online store attributes, however, changes as differences are observed between 2003 and 2004.

Research limitations/implications

The online environment is dynamic and the paper captures some of the changes in the relationships between website attributes and customer satisfaction. This requires continuous monitoring of the online environment. Since the paper relies on secondary data collected by bizrate.com, the research is limited by specific website attributes and measures of customer satisfaction adopted by a commercial enterprise.

Practical implications

Online retailers must be strategic about fulfillment variables. When online stores compete with each other, it is easier to copy certain attributes like “shipping options” than other attributes such as “on‐time delivery.” This suggests that the most creative, interactive, and vivid online site will not compensate for weak fulfillment and customer support capabilities.

Originality/value

No other paper has looked at these data, collected from real customers making purchases at actual merchant sites, over two time periods. The results provide insights regarding stability of findings.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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