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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1968

A.S.C. Ehrenberg and G.J. Goodhardt

Discusses repeatbuying in terms of a case history of a non‐durable product. Measures the repeatbuying behaviour by means of a survey carried out for the Market Analysis…

Abstract

Discusses repeatbuying in terms of a case history of a non‐durable product. Measures the repeatbuying behaviour by means of a survey carried out for the Market Analysis and Evaluation Grant, Unilever. Reveals how repeatbuying of a new brand soon reaches a par with its competitors.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Denise D. Schoenbachler, Geoffrey L. Gordon and Timothy W. Aurand

Building brand loyalty has become more important, yet more difficult to achieve in today's marketplace. This research investigates a possible avenue for building brand…

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17409

Abstract

Building brand loyalty has become more important, yet more difficult to achieve in today's marketplace. This research investigates a possible avenue for building brand loyalty that is not directly related to the marketing of the product – attracting individual investors in the brand's corporate parent. A survey of over 500 individual investors revealed that individual investors do tend to buy brands from companies in which they hold stock, and investors may buy stock in a company because they have experience with the brand. In contrast with brand loyalty, where consumers will not buy competitive offerings, individual investors indicated they would buy competitive offerings, suggesting that stock ownership is more likely to lead to repeat purchase behavior, but not brand loyalty.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Tom Cannon

Change, Adaption and Development are central to modern marketing. This paper provides an overview of the subject area of innovation and new product development. The…

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2610

Abstract

Change, Adaption and Development are central to modern marketing. This paper provides an overview of the subject area of innovation and new product development. The critical role of change in modern industrial and industrialising societies is explored in depth. Emphasis is given to the managerial implications of research to date. Key issues such as the interplay between creativity, the motivating force behind invention, and control, the basis for successful innovation, are reviewed Changing attitudes and approaches to new product development play a major part in this study, particularly the growing awareness that innovation is no longer an end in itself, but a part of a carefully controlled marketing system.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

John Dawes, Jenni Romaniuk and Annabel Mansfield

The purpose of this paper is to examine competition between tourism destination brands in terms of how they share travelers with each other.

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2329

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine competition between tourism destination brands in terms of how they share travelers with each other.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyzes survey data from four international markets (USA, UK, Japan and Singapore). The study examines the cross‐purchasing of travel destinations. It applies an established empirical generalization, the duplication of purchase law (DPL) to frame hypotheses and contextualize results.

Findings

The overall results are consistent with the DPL. Destination brands share tourists with other destinations generally in‐line with the popularity of the competing destination. However, there are very noticeable market partitions, most of which take two forms: destinations that are either geographically close to each other, or close to the point of origin. Destination brands in these partitions share travelers far more than they would be expected to, given their respective size.

Practical implications

Tourism marketers need to appreciate the broad nature of competition. A specific destination brand competes with many other travel destinations, sharing customers more with other broadly popular destinations and less with less popular destinations.

Originality/value

The analytical approach presented in this study provides a straightforward benchmark for assessing the expected level of competition between particular tourist destinations, given their respective overall popularity.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Margaret Faulkner, Oanh Truong and Jenni Romaniuk

The purpose of this research is to analyze brand competition in China using the Duplication of Purchase (DoP) law, with important implications for understanding Chinese…

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1002

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyze brand competition in China using the Duplication of Purchase (DoP) law, with important implications for understanding Chinese buyer behavior in comparison with Western buyers. Discovered in the Western markets, the DoP law holds across a variety of product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple sets of new data are examined to extend past research in the application of the DoP law in Chinese buying behavior. This study draws on panel data and self-reported data, utilizing bootstrapping to identify partitions where excess sharing occurs.

Findings

This paper finds the DoP law holds across six categories (two personal care, two impulse categories and two durables), as well as over multiple years. Brands in China share customers with other brands in line with the market share of the competitor brand. There were few partitions where brands shared significantly more customers than expected. Partitions occur due to the same umbrella brand or ownership, and geographic location.

Research limitations/implications

Areas for further research include extended replication in other categories, investigating partitions and whether a different consumer path to purchase occurs in China.

Practical implications

DoP can be applied across a wide range of categories in China to understand market structure. New entrants to China can use this approach to understand a category from a consumer behavior perceptive. DoP provides guidelines for marketers to identify competition and allocate resources appropriately.

Originality/value

This research provides a comprehensive, unparalleled examination across six very different categories of brand competition in China. This gives confidence in the robustness and generalizability of the results.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Navneet Bhatnagar and Arun Kumar Gopalaswamy

This paper aims to identify the dimensions of a firm’s service innovation competence. This paper also aims to establish the relationship between a firm’s service…

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2532

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the dimensions of a firm’s service innovation competence. This paper also aims to establish the relationship between a firm’s service innovation competence dimensions and customer-oriented service innovation configurations and customer adoption. This study probes the supply side of service innovation to assess the key drivers or capabilities that influence the service innovation process at the firm level.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the triangulation method using existing theoretical concept supplemented by 18 in-depth interviews of senior level managers from service firms from three sectors – hospitality, mobile telecommunication services and financial services. The interview findings were supplemented by 12 service innovation case studies (four from each sector). Content analysis of in-depth interviews was performed using three raters, and inter-rater reliability was tested. Case studies were categorized in terms of the strength of the innovation competence dimension observed.

Findings

Based on the content analysis of the interviews and categorization of case study observations, six distinct dimensions of the firm’s service innovation competence were identified. Four attributes of each dimension were also identified. Based on the interview insights and case observations, seven propositions are suggested, and a conceptual framework is presented to establish the relationship between the firm’s service innovation competence dimensions and service innovation configurations and customer adoption.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in the Indian context and remains to be tested using quantitative research. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework in a different geographical context to ascertain its validity.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework presented in the paper may help managers of service firms in building innovation capabilities that are relevant to development of customer-oriented innovations. This would lead to better customer adoption of their new services.

Originality/value

This paper fills an important knowledge gap regarding the dimensions of a critical supply-side component of service innovation, that is, innovation competence. Clear identification of competence dimensions and their relationship with customer adoption extends the current knowledge on service innovation.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Antonietta Bonello

Abstract

Details

Understanding the Investor: A Maltese Study of Risk and Behavior in Financial Investment Decisions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-705-9

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Chengchen Liu, Ya Zhang and Jing Zhang

There is growing interest among marketers in advertising and promoting their brands by adopting an online celebrity endorsement strategy. However, how online celebrities…

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3959

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing interest among marketers in advertising and promoting their brands by adopting an online celebrity endorsement strategy. However, how online celebrities build their own brand equity and how online celebrity brand equity impacts fans’ purchase behavior have not been extensively researched in the extant literature. This paper aims to explore the factors that contribute to online celebrity branding and improving fans’ purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and an experiment were conducted among consumers from the mainland of China. A total of 12 hypotheses were proposed to exam how self-congruity and virtual interactivity impact online celebrity branding and to explore the moderating role of perceived quality and product type.

Findings

This paper reveals that customers’ perceived self-congruity with online celebrities’ image and virtual interactivity positively impact the brand equity of online celebrities. Additionally, compared with virtual interactivity, the effect of customer perceived self-congruity on a brand is more significant. The brand equity of online celebrities thereby drives followers’ purchase intentions and the perceived quality of products positively moderates this relationship.

Originality/value

The research conclusions provide managerial implications for marketing practitioners for how to use human brands on social media platforms in the web 2.0 era and ultimately enhance consumer purchase intentions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1970

T. Cannon and G.J. Goodhard

Studies purchasing behaviour for the leading brands of a frequently bought household product and discusses this. Enquires in depth about the nature and habits of those…

Abstract

Studies purchasing behaviour for the leading brands of a frequently bought household product and discusses this. Enquires in depth about the nature and habits of those buyers of a brand – who in a given time period purchase that brand to the exclusion of competitors. Focuses on the purchasing behaviour of sole buyers (who mostly buy only one particular brand). Examines the incidence of sole buyers; frequency of buying, and period‐to‐period repeat buying; how many in a given period; how often purchased in that period; and how many buy it again in the next period? Concludes that present findings give one answer – showing that the sole buyer as defined is more regular in his/her buying behaviour than is the average buyer of the brand.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Johan Bruwer and Kathleen Kelley

The purpose of this paper is to examine the links between perceived festival service performance quality, satisfaction, buying wine at the event, and the first-time/repeat

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1165

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the links between perceived festival service performance quality, satisfaction, buying wine at the event, and the first-time/repeat tourist dynamic.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted on 368 attendees at a major wine festival in the northeast USA using intercept face-to-face interviews.

Findings

The facility-related quality aspects are a stronger predictor of buying behaviour than activity-related aspects and amenities. A relationship between performance quality perception and satisfaction could not be found. 35-year and older repeat visitors are the highest yielding festival visitor group from a financial viewpoint. First-timers are far more short-term oriented than repeat visitors when making the final decision to attend the festival event.

Research limitations/implications

It is very important to achieve a high degree of repeat festival attendance as this directly influenced the financial gains in selling more wine. The nature and types of activities offered at a festival must be cohesive with the theme of the event. The festival activities offered should be continually evaluated for signs of wear out, and renewed, or replaced if necessary.

Originality/value

The research provides a new perspective to festivalscape knowledge in that it identifies the first-time and repeat visitor dynamic as a strong predictor of actual buying behaviour at a festival. The higher the proportion of repeat visitors, the higher the likelihood of (wine) buying.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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