Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Scott M. Mourtgos, Richard A. Wise and Thomas Petros

Past research indicates that increasing police arrests deters crime. However, little research exists on how restricting police arrests affects crime. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Past research indicates that increasing police arrests deters crime. However, little research exists on how restricting police arrests affects crime. The purpose of this paper is to test whether restrictions on police authority to arrest affects deterrence and crime rates.

Design/methodology/approach

The data consisted of crime statistics for 105 criminal suspects from a medium-sized police department in the western USA. A 2×4 mixed analysis of variance compared the suspects’ criminal activity for a four-month period before and after the arrest restrictions were imposed to ascertain how they affected deterrence and crime rates.

Findings

The restrictions on police arrests significantly increased the crime rate. Moreover, the crime rate increased the longer the restrictions on police arrest authority were in effect. In sum, the present study provides empirical support for the hypothesis that restrictions on police arrest authority decrease deterrence and increase the crime rate.

Practical implications

The present study suggests that restrictions on police arrest authority decreases deterrence and may significantly increase the crime rate. The restrictions may also have deleterious effects on police departments. Several states have recently imposed restrictions on police authority to arrest, and many other states are considering implementing such restrictions. Policy makers should carefully consider the results of the present study before implementing these policies.

Originality/value

The study fills a void in the crime literature by demonstrating that restrictions on police authority to arrest can decrease deterrence and increase the crime rate.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Adrian Slywotzky and Richard Wise

A new form of business innovation, a response to the current challenges to growth initiatives, is being pioneered by a handful of farsighted companies. These companies have…

1558

Abstract

A new form of business innovation, a response to the current challenges to growth initiatives, is being pioneered by a handful of farsighted companies. These companies have shifted their approach from product innovation to demand innovation. Such new‐growth businesses focus on growing new value by discovering new forms of demand. For example, in the mid‐1990s, engineers within several GM business units realized that technological advances might enable the creation of a new business focused on the needs of drivers. The crucial factors in GM’s success have been its ability to look at customers’ driving needs from a fresh perspective and its decision to serve these needs through a business design that leverages GM’s unique hidden asset – its unequaled installed base of vehicles.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Adrian Slywotzky and Richard Wise

In the years to come, traditional product‐centered strategies alone won’t create the kind of growth companies desire. An alternative platform for driving significant, sustained…

1729

Abstract

In the years to come, traditional product‐centered strategies alone won’t create the kind of growth companies desire. An alternative platform for driving significant, sustained new growth is demand innovation (as opposed to product innovation). Demand innovation focuses on using one’s product position as a starting point from which to do new things for customers that solve their biggest problems and improve their overall performance. Embedded in the customer’s use of your product are all kinds of hassles and inefficiencies as they buy it, use it, store it, maintain it, finance it, and eventually dispose of it. This broader web of activity represents tremendous economic activity, often 10 to 20 times greater in total value than the product market itself. Understanding and participating in this customer “value chain” is the key to demand innovation. Making demand innovation profitable means improving both your customers’ economics and capturing value for your company. Here success is rooted in putting to use a set of powerful hidden assets that your company may already have. Five types of hidden assets are described with guidelines for how to master the new discipline of demand innovation. Five principles are offered to guide managers through the challenges that arise for developing new‐growth projects into major opportunities.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Adrian Slywotzky and Richard Wise

Investigates complacency by managers at successful organizations and how they seem to ignore warning signs of danger on the horizon. Stresses that these are the wrong reactions…

Abstract

Investigates complacency by managers at successful organizations and how they seem to ignore warning signs of danger on the horizon. Stresses that these are the wrong reactions and recognizing the danger requires knowing what to look for, and lists three patterns, which allow for crises to afflict successful growth‐oriented companies. Extensive detail in four figures aids by way of explanation. Sums up that scepticism over growth crisis is a natural reaction for managers and investors in healthy companies, but there are benefits in the incorporation of this new way of thinking.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that…

Abstract

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that date two extensions to the building have taken place. The first, in 1882, provided a separate room for both Reference and Lending libraries; the second, opened in 1938, provided a new Children's Department. Together with the original cost of the building, these extensions were entirely financed by Sir Peter Coats, James Coats of Auchendrane and Daniel Coats respectively. The people of Paisley indeed owe much to this one family, whose generosity was great. They not only provided the capital required but continued to donate many useful and often extremely valuable works of reference over the many years that followed. In 1975 Paisley Library was incorporated in the new Renfrew District library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Richard Wise

Looks at why traditional growth tactics have become less effective and why it is necessary to balance short term moves with new business building. Looks at understanding customer

1157

Abstract

Purpose

Looks at why traditional growth tactics have become less effective and why it is necessary to balance short term moves with new business building. Looks at understanding customer priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the next year, this column will lay out a practical growth program for managers, balancing short‐term moves with new‐business building.

Findings

Growth moves fall along a spectrum of categories ranging from traditional product innovation to longer‐term strategies such as taking core capabilities to new markets. Managing new growth requires an active feedback loop of constantly monitoring the progress of each initiative.

Practical implications

Provides managers with guidelines for growth action plans.

Originality/value

Of particular to strategic planners, CEOs, senior executives.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Richard Wise and Andrew Pierce

Looks at which brands are best positioned for growth and why it is important to actively manage brands as a cohesive portfolio.

2830

Abstract

Purpose

Looks at which brands are best positioned for growth and why it is important to actively manage brands as a cohesive portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

Lists four key principles that the best practitioners of brand portfolio management should follow.

Findings

The best practitioners of brand portfolio management follow four key principles: push sleeper brands to their full potential; launch new brands or acquire strategically; rationalize overlapping brands; shut down the weakest brands.

Practical implications

Provides managers with guidelines for managing brand portfolios.

Originality/value

Of particular benefit to strategic planners, CEOs, senior executives, brand managers and marketing managers.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Adrian Slywotzky

This article urges executives to expand their view of risk. Instead of just defending against bad risk events, leading companies define and anticipate the upside risks that, when…

3158

Abstract

This article urges executives to expand their view of risk. Instead of just defending against bad risk events, leading companies define and anticipate the upside risks that, when well managed, can deliver the maximum rewards. The discipline of strategic risk management allows firms to raise their growth potential in addition to reducing their economic volatility. The author shows executives how to avoid the biggest risk of all – not taking the right growth risks for the business. Businesses today are exposed to greater risks across the board, ranging from political risks to product liability and environmental hazard risks. There also are a set of strategic risks that have become increasingly disruptive. These include not just the obvious high‐probability risks that a new ad campaign or new product launch will fail, but other less‐obvious risks as well in areas such as technology and customer needs. Failure to anticipate and manage this spectrum of strategic risks can expose a company to dramatic decreases in shareholder value and severe swings in stock prices. In today’s risk‐intense environment, firms must manage their economic and risk profiles more actively. The goal is not to eradicate risk, but to deliver the maximum reward for an acceptable level of risk. The author addresses some of the most important forms of strategic risk and the countermeasures that can be used to address them.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Richard L. Wise

Recent corporate scandals such as WorldCom, Enron, and others suggest a failure of corporate governance, that is, of the allocation of power and its lawful use and accountability…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent corporate scandals such as WorldCom, Enron, and others suggest a failure of corporate governance, that is, of the allocation of power and its lawful use and accountability within the corporation.

Design/methodology/approach

This chapter presents a game theoretic model for analyzing the power dynamics among the three groups responsible for oversight in the Anglo-American corporate model – namely the Board of Directors through its audit committee, corporate management, and the external auditors.

Findings

The chapter shows, among other findings, that the current governance structure results in an extreme imbalance of power among the three groups that not only permits but even induces management to conceal necessary financial data and often to ignore the long-term interests of the firm.

Implications and value

The chapter also derives changes in principles of governance that can right such imbalances and prevent defalcations from taking place through institutionalizing effective ex-ante checks and balances of power in addition to the ex post measures that come into play only after a wrong has been committed and which are the case with recent exchange rules and Congressional enactments.

Research limitations

None.

Originality/value

No prior analysis along these lines.

Details

Advances in Financial Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-120-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1957

AN ESTEEMED correspondent points out that there are about two dozen library magazines of all sorts and sizes in circulation, whereas when he started his career there were no more…

Abstract

AN ESTEEMED correspondent points out that there are about two dozen library magazines of all sorts and sizes in circulation, whereas when he started his career there were no more than three. Our correspondent has himself had considerable editorial experience, and it may be that he is still in harness in that regard. One of his earliest efforts was in running the magazine of the old Library Assistants' Association, and it is not likely that that magazine has ever reached the same heights of excellence as it attained in his day. He observes that there are far too many library magazines now in circulation. We agree.

Details

Library Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

1 – 10 of over 2000