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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2024

Richard Tarpey, Jinfeng Yue, Yong Zha and Jiahong Zhang

The importance of service firms cooperating with digital platforms is widely acknowledged. The authors study three contractual relationships (fixed-cost, cost-sharing, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of service firms cooperating with digital platforms is widely acknowledged. The authors study three contractual relationships (fixed-cost, cost-sharing, and profit-sharing) between service firms (specifically hotels) and digital platforms in a highly fragmented service supply chain to examine which of these contract types optimizes profits.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors extend prior models analyzing the optimal expected total profit from the travel service firm (hotel)–digital platform relationship, providing new insights into each contract type’s ability to coordinate decentralized systems and optimize profits for both parties.

Findings

This study finds that fixed cost contracts cannot coordinate the decentralized system. Cost-sharing contracts can coordinate the decentralized system but only allow one channel profit split. In contrast, profit-sharing contracts may not always perfectly coordinate the decentralized system but support alternative profit allocations. Practically, both profit-sharing and cost-sharing contracts are preferable to fixed-cost contracts.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for travel service firm managers to consider when structuring contracts with digital platforms to focus on profit optimization. Profit-sharing contracts are most preferable when cost and revenue data are fully shared between parties, while cost-sharing contracts are preferable over fixed-cost contracts.

Originality/value

This study extends prior investigations into the utility of different contract types on the optimal profit of a travel service firm (hotel)-digital platform provider relationship. The research fills a gap in the literature concerning the contracts used in these relationship types.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2023

Emma Tarpey, Zoe Stephenson and Richard Barker

The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence base for the use of risk formulation in forensic practice settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence base for the use of risk formulation in forensic practice settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic literature review principles were adopted to identify literature exploring risk formulation in forensic practice settings in relation to offending behaviour.

Findings

Data were analysed using a narrative synthesis approach, and commonalities were observed across some of the studies in terms of definitions, outcomes, and implementation, of risk formulation; however, the findings of the review did not provide a definitive account of risk formulation practice in forensic settings. This is due to the narrow scope of the included studies, the small yet diverse samples, the heterogeneity in research aims and the methodological weaknesses apparent within the included studies.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to understand the application and outcomes of risk formulation in forensic practice settings.

Practical implications

Practitioners should be clear about how they are defining, implementing and assessing the outcomes of risk formulation, alongside being mindful of the evidence base when utilising forensic risk formulation in practice.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to focus solely on the evidence base for forensic risk formulation in practice.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Jack A. Lesser and Lakshmi K. Thumuluri

Examines the extent to which a variety of widely utilized consumer behavior concepts are systematically related. States that within marketing, consumer behaviour research appears…

Abstract

Examines the extent to which a variety of widely utilized consumer behavior concepts are systematically related. States that within marketing, consumer behaviour research appears to lack structure and direction.Attempts to determine the nature of the interrelationships which exist between different widely examined classical consumer concepts and provides some discussion regarding the findings including areas for further comparison.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Richard M.S. Wilson

Suggests that most managers (other than those in marketing) take the view that too much money is spent on marketing. Adumbrates that the accountant may be able to contribute to…

Abstract

Suggests that most managers (other than those in marketing) take the view that too much money is spent on marketing. Adumbrates that the accountant may be able to contribute to improved decision making in marketing with regard to expenditure as an investment outlay rather than current expenses. Stresses, herein, that the concern for accounting is with marketing assets and their intangibility. Discusses further assets, valuation and investment and portrays these with the aid of tables and figures. Sums up by saying that a strong case can be made for recognizing many examples of marketing outlay as investments in assets rather than current operating expenses, showing new light on attitudes towards marketing decision‐making and financial reporting.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Hans B. Thorelli, Jeen‐Su Lim and Jongsuk Ye

The relative importance of country of origin, product warranty, andretail store image on consumers′ product quality perception, overallattitude toward the product, and purchase…

2252

Abstract

The relative importance of country of origin, product warranty, and retail store image on consumers′ product quality perception, overall attitude toward the product, and purchase intentions is investigated. A 2x2x2 full factorial design with two levels (high and low) of country of origin, warranty and retail store image is utilised. ANOVA results show that country of origin and warranty cues have significant impacts on the three dependent measures. The interaction effects of all three independent variables are significant for the quality perception and overall attitude towards the product but are not significant for the purchase intentions. In addition excellent warranty terms combined with store reputation has a greater impact on the dependent variables than the country‐of‐origin cue. Managerial implications of the research findings are discussed.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1959

WE have recently published one or two articles in which a contributor with a considerable knowledge of the Chinese economy has described some of that country's industrial…

Abstract

WE have recently published one or two articles in which a contributor with a considerable knowledge of the Chinese economy has described some of that country's industrial activities. The articles have been scrupulously factual and impartial in revealing the ingenuity which has enabled a people desperately short of the technological resources of the industrialised nations to secure for themselves some of life's essentials.

Details

Work Study, vol. 8 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Simon S.M. Ho and Victor T.F. Ng

One reason for the slow adoption rate of Electronic Fund Transfer atPoint‐of‐Sale (EFTPoS) is that consumers perceive that EFTPoS has ahigher level of risk than other traditional…

7386

Abstract

One reason for the slow adoption rate of Electronic Fund Transfer at Point‐of‐Sale (EFTPoS) is that consumers perceive that EFTPoS has a higher level of risk than other traditional payment methods. Makes use of a concept in consumer behaviour and perceived risk to study the differences of consumers′ risk perceptions among alternative payment methods and whether these perceptions will be affected by the size of purchase and EFTPoS usage experience. The major findings are: (1) EFTPoS has the lowest physical risk and highest financial risk, the credit card has the lowest psychological risk and highest time loss risk, while cash has the highest physical risk and lowest performance risk; (2) Physical risk, financial risk and time loss risk for cash payment are significantly higher when the purchase is large, while performance risk for EFTPoS and credit card payment is significantly higher when the purchase is small; and (3) users of EFTPoS have a significantly higher level of perceived financial and time loss risk than non‐users, while non‐users have higher level of psychological risk. The overall finding is that the risk profile of EFTPoS is similar to that of the credit card but significantly different from cash.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

David R. Rink

Development of Research ProblemThe needs, wants, and desires of industrial customers are fulfilled in a market environment epitomised by exchanges between buyers and sellers. Both

Abstract

Development of Research ProblemThe needs, wants, and desires of industrial customers are fulfilled in a market environment epitomised by exchanges between buyers and sellers. Both of these parties execute strategic moves which are intended to perpetuate their existence as well as optimise the use of available resources. While the over‐riding ambition of the investigator was to identify a model‐form which might serve as a reference for substantiating certain strategic moves by corporate purchasing executives, the more immediate desire was to test empirically the validity of applying such a theory to purchasing. The conceptual model‐form was hypothesised by Berenson. He posited it would answer some of the questions raised by purchasing executives concerning guidelines for establishing purchasing strategy as well as for setting priorities among strategies. The concept was the product life cycle (PLC) theory.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Tibert Verhagen, Selmar Meents, Jani Merikivi, Anne Moes and Jesse Weltevreden

This study aims to develop an understanding of how customers of a physical retail store valuate receiving location-based mobile phone messages when they are in proximity of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop an understanding of how customers of a physical retail store valuate receiving location-based mobile phone messages when they are in proximity of the store. It proposes and tests a model relating two benefits (personalization and location congruency) and two sacrifices (privacy concern and intrusiveness) to message value perceptions and store visit attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a vignette-based survey to collect data from a sample of 1,225 customers of a fashion retailer. The postulated research model is estimated using SmartPLS 3.0 with the consistent-PLS algorithm and further validated via a post-hoc test.

Findings

The empirical testing confirms the predictive validity and robustness of the model and reveals that location congruency and intrusiveness are the location-based message characteristics with the strongest effects on message value and store visit attitude.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the underexplored field of store entry research and extends previous location-based messaging studies by integrating personalization, location congruency, privacy concern and intrusiveness into one validated model.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Sak Onkvisit and John Shaw

Self‐concept, despite its marketing relevance, has been overshadowed by other psychological concepts. The self‐concept is, however, significant and relevant to the study of…

8135

Abstract

Self‐concept, despite its marketing relevance, has been overshadowed by other psychological concepts. The self‐concept is, however, significant and relevant to the study of consumer behavior because many purchases made by consumers are directly influenced by the image an individual has of himself. A fundamental question involves the process of the formation of the self‐concept. Several distinct qualities exist within the self‐concept, and once the self‐concept is established, these have a bearing upon the individual's behavior and his relationship with his objective, subjective, social, and ideal self. For marketers, an understanding of the self‐concept and self‐image can provide the means for developing more effective marketing programs. Consistency and congruence also play an important part in establishing the relationship between the self‐concept, the individual's image, and final purchase behavior. Other factors also play a part in the process and, in some situations, misunderstandings about their importance can result in less than effective marketing efforts. Careful research and analysis of the relevant factors affecting the self‐concept and their effect on purchase behavior can make for more effective market strategic planning. This article examines the various issues related to the marketing applicability of the self‐concept and discusses its implications in terms of research and market strategic planning.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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