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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Alyson Kettles and Phil Woods

Forensic nursing is a term applied to nurses working in many different areas of clinical practice, such as high security hospitals, medium secure units, low secure units…

Abstract

Forensic nursing is a term applied to nurses working in many different areas of clinical practice, such as high security hospitals, medium secure units, low secure units, acute mental health wards, specialised private hospitals, psychiatric intensive care units, court liaison schemes, and outpatient, community and rehabilitation services. Rarely is the term defined in the general literature and as a concept it is multifaceted. Concept analysis is a method for exploring and evaluating the meaning of words. It gives precise definitions, both theoretical and operational, for use in theory, clinical practice and research. A concept analysis provides a logical basis for defining terms and helps us to refine and define a concept that derives from practice, research and theory. This paper uses the strategy of concept analysis to explore the term ‘forensic nursing’ and finds a working definition of forensic mental health nursing. The historical background and literature are reviewed using concept analysis to bring the term into focus and to define it more clearly. Forensic nursing is found to derive from forensic practice. A proposed definition of forensic nursing is given.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Zabihollah Rezaee, Gerald H. Lander and Thomas A. Gavin

Makes the case for inclusion of forensic accounting in the 150‐houraccounting training role in the USA. Practitioner roles are as fraudexaminer, litigation consultant and…

Abstract

Makes the case for inclusion of forensic accounting in the 150‐hour accounting training role in the USA. Practitioner roles are as fraud examiner, litigation consultant and expert witness for which need is expanding and remuneration considerable and stable. Makes detailed recommendations for integrating forensic skills training into the curriculum.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Andrew Day

Supervision is often regarded as an important aspect of forensic psychological practice and yet little evidence exists to support the idea that supervised practice leads…

Abstract

Purpose

Supervision is often regarded as an important aspect of forensic psychological practice and yet little evidence exists to support the idea that supervised practice leads to better outcomes for either clients or organisations. This paper seeks to discuss some of the aims of supervision in relation to the needs of forensic psychologists, such that practice in this area can be developed further.

Design/methodology/approach

The current published literature on the nature of forensic supervision is reviewed and discussed.

Findings

A number of different models of supervision have been proposed and supervisory experiences can vary markedly according to both the individuals involved and the setting in which the work is conducted. There is a need to develop specialist models of supervision for those who work in forensic settings. Further research is needed to establish an evidence‐base for supervisory practices.

Originality/value

There has been very little previous consideration of the nature of post‐qualification forensic supervision despite the need, and in some cases requirement, that forensic practitioners receive supervision. This paper discusses some of those issues that are considered important to effective supervision in the forensic setting.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2014

Mark F Dalgarno and Sharon A Riordan

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the lived experiences of learning disability nurses working within forensic services, and their views on their practice as a speciality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the lived experiences of learning disability nurses working within forensic services, and their views on their practice as a speciality.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, semi-structured interview-based design was used and participant's voices were examined through interpretive phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Nurses explored a range of topics related to their practice and overall, five superordinate themes were developed. Forensic nursing as being both the same and different to generic nursing, the journey, and the emotional challenge of forensic nursing, the balancing act of everyday practice and the role of language within forensic nursing practice.

Originality/value

Very little research has examined the views of learning disability nurses within the forensic field. This study gives both a voice to these nurses and suggests areas of interest both for research and for clinicians to consider in their practice.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Zabihollah Rezaee and Jim Wang

This paper aims to examine the relevance of Big Data to forensic accounting practice and education by gathering opinions from a sample of academics and practitioners in China.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relevance of Big Data to forensic accounting practice and education by gathering opinions from a sample of academics and practitioners in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a survey of academics and practitioners regarding the desired demand, importance and content of Big Data educational skills and topics for forensic accounting education to effectively respond to challenges and opportunities in the age of Big Data.

Findings

Results indicate that the demand for and interest in Big Data/data analytics and forensic accounting will continue to increase; Big Data/data analytics and forensic accounting should be integrated into the business curriculum; many of the suggested Big Data topics should be integrated into forensic accounting education; and some attributes and techniques of Big Data are important in improving forensic accounting education and practice.

Research limitations/implications

Readers should interpret the results with caution because of the sample size (95 academics and 103 practitioners) and responses obtained from academics and practitioners in one country (China) that may not be representative of the global population.

Practical implications

The results are useful in integrating Big Data topics into the forensic accounting curriculum and in redesigning the forensic accounting courses/programs.

Social implications

The results have implications for forensic accountants in effectively fulfilling their responsibilities to their profession and society by combating fraud.

Originality/value

This study provides educational, research and practical implications as Big Data and forensic accounting are advancing.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Barrie Green and Simon Wood

In contemporary forensic mental health and learning disability services effective care and risk management, which is safe for individuals and the public, can only be…

Abstract

In contemporary forensic mental health and learning disability services effective care and risk management, which is safe for individuals and the public, can only be delivered by drawing upon differing perspectives and interventions. In practice uni‐disciplinary training abounds, but the authors found a lack of formal training inherently constructed to be multidisciplinary. Therefore, a course was developed, in conjunction with a university partner, to meet this need. This modular course is flexible in nature, but is normally delivered over one semester leading to certification. In addition, there is the option of either essay or portfolio submission providing access to credits toward other academic awards. This programme of study, ‘Professional Practice in Secure Environments’ was recently cited as an example of good practice in From Values to Action, the CNO review of mental health nursing (NIMHE, 2006). Modules begin from a foundation of theory and relate it intimately to practice; students develop an understanding of multidisciplinary working by both training together and training in each others' conceptual frameworks. Participants to date include those from health, criminal justice, and social care arenas, and those with no previous higher study have submitted essays. Evaluations are positive and are used to refine delivery and content. The authors conclude that the course demystifies practice and academia, and provides access to both. This is an integral part of the training strategy, which is directed to meeting current and future service needs.Current and future developments and expansion of forensic mental health provision into new types of service will be less effective without a move away from traditional educational approaches. Services to meet the specific needs of groups such as secure long‐stay and personality disorders cannot be sustained effectively without a parallel development of new types of training.The strategic thinking behind this course, practical obstacles encountered, and solutions developed are described in this paper.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Bryan Howieson

The aim of this paper is to explore how virtue ethics might inform our understanding about what constitutes “good” practice in forensic accounting. In particular, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore how virtue ethics might inform our understanding about what constitutes “good” practice in forensic accounting. In particular, the paper explores the concept of phronesis (or practical wisdom) as a basis for guiding the application of professional judgement in forensic accounting practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a review of relevant literature.

Findings

Prior literature has identified a number of technical and personal characteristics and attributes that are desirable in forensic accounting practitioners. Although being ethical is identified as an important characteristic, the question of what constitutes a “good” forensic accountant has not hitherto been investigated. Because of the profession’s multi-disciplinary and highly technical nature, forensic accountants are significantly at risk of conflating ethics with compliance with the law. The paper suggests that an understanding of virtue ethics and especially the virtue of “phronesis” or practical wisdom will help forensic accountants maintain public confidence and quality in their services and provide practical guidance on the exercise of professional judgement.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the primacy currently given in forensic accounting literature and practice to a commercial logic, technical competencies and legal compliance risks damaging the professional standing of forensic accountants and, over time, reduces the ability of forensic accountants to exercise professional judgement in complex unstructured situations. Virtue ethics can act as a useful counter point to these threats.

Social implications

A recognition of the need for the forensic accounting profession to collectively develop phronesis would re-establish the primacy of the profession’s public interest logic and maintain public trust and quality in forensic accounting services.

Originality/value

There appears to be no prior literature in forensic accounting which explores the application of virtue ethics in this field. In addition, although virtue ethics has been the subject of some prior papers in accounting per se, the importance of phronesis as a basis for understanding the nature and application of professional judgement has not been addressed.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Jessica Holley, James Tapp and Simon Draycott

Coercive practices – which are used as means to manage violent/aggressive behaviour in secure forensic settings – have come under scrutiny in recent years due to their…

Abstract

Purpose

Coercive practices – which are used as means to manage violent/aggressive behaviour in secure forensic settings – have come under scrutiny in recent years due to their paradoxical effects on provoking further service user aggression and violence. Previous research has found relationships between increased service user aggression with both service users’ interpersonal styles and perceptions of staff coercion (i.e. staff limit setting). This paper aims to investigate whether forensic service users’ levels of interpersonal sensitivity to dominance increase levels of self-reported anger and rates of aggression towards staff through perceptions of staff coercion.

Design/methodology/approach

In a cross-sectional quantitative study design, 70 service users were recruited from one high and two medium secure forensic hospitals. Standardised measures were completed by service users and recorded incident data was collected within the past year. Correlation and mediation analyses were run to investigate the relationship between study variables.

Findings

A significant relationship was found between service users’ interpersonal sensitivity to dominance and self-reported rates of anger, where forensic service users’ who had higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity to others’ dominance were likely to report higher rates of anger. No significant relationships were found between all other study variables.

Practical implications

The findings from this study contradict previous research where coercive practices may not necessarily increase rates of aggression towards staff but, in the context of service users’ interpersonal sensitivities to dominance, it may be more useful to consider the way in which coercive practices are implemented.

Originality/value

There is a gap in the literature, which looks at the way in which forensic service users perceive coercive practices in relation to their interpersonal sensitivities and whether this too has an impact upon service user aggression.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2004

Zabihollah Rezaee, D. Larry Crumbley and Robert C. Elmore

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-868-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Jean Adams, Sandra Steele, Alyson Kettles, Helen Walker, Ian Brown, Mick Collins, Susan Sookoo and Phil Woods

The aim of the paper is to share the experience of multi‐national, funded research practice and to explore some of the issues related to conducting such studies in forensic

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to share the experience of multi‐national, funded research practice and to explore some of the issues related to conducting such studies in forensic practice. The BEST Index is a normative forensic risk assessment instrument that can be implemented through the different levels of security. It benefits the patient as it is a structured assessment instrument for assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating care in the context of risk assessment. A large‐scale, five‐country EU‐funded study was conducted to validate the instrument and to develop educational tools. Some published description of research experience exists but does not cover the issues for people new to high‐level research studies or the partnership working that is required to make multi‐national, multi‐lingual studies work to the benefit of the patient. Many issues arose during the study and those considered important to deal with, and the actions taken, are described, including ethical issues, management and organisational issues, and ‘the long haul’. Being new to research and coming straight in to this kind of large‐scale clinical research requires preparation and thought.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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