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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Kasia Zalewska-Kurek

This paper seeks to understand the strategic behaviour of researchers when producing knowledge in two scientific fields – nanotechnology and social sciences.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand the strategic behaviour of researchers when producing knowledge in two scientific fields – nanotechnology and social sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted semi-structured interviews with 43 researchers to analyse the needs for strategic interdependence (resource-sharing) and for organisational autonomy (decision-making) in knowledge production. When aligned, these two concepts form three modes of behaviour: mode1, mode2 and mode3.

Findings

The empirical study results show that, besides well-studied differences in various publications, there are large behaviour differences between social science and nanotechnology researchers. While nanotechnology researchersbehaviours are mostly in mode3 (sharing resources; highly autonomous), social science researchersbehaviours tend to be in mode1 (highly autonomous; no need to share resources).

Practical implications

This study delivers an understanding of the differences in the strategic behaviours of researchers in different scientific fields. The author proposes managerial interventions for research managers – university and research group leaders.

Originality/value

While most studies that compare scientific fields look at knowledge production outcomes, the author analyses conditions that differentiate these outcomes. To this end, the author compares individual researchersbehaviours in different fields by analysing the need for collaboration and the need for autonomy.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Kenneth F. Hyde

Independent travelers are those vacationers who have booked only a minimum of their transportation and accommodation arrangements prior to departure on the vacation…

Abstract

Independent travelers are those vacationers who have booked only a minimum of their transportation and accommodation arrangements prior to departure on the vacation. Independent travel is an important and growing sector of worldwide tourism. Choice of vacation itinerary for the independent vacation represents a complex series of decisions regarding purchase of multiple leisure and tourism services. This chapter builds and tests a model of independent traveler decision-making for choice of vacation itinerary. The research undertaken employs a two-phase, inductive–deductive case study design. In the deductive phase, the researcher interviewed 20 travel parties vacationing in New Zealand for the first time. The researcher interviewed respondents at both the beginning and the end of their New Zealand vacations. The study compares pre-vacation research and plans, and actual vacation behaviors, on a case-by-case basis. The study examines case study narratives and quantitative measures of crucial variables. The study tests two competing models of independent traveler decision-making, using a pattern-matching procedure. This embedded research design results in high multi-source, multi-method validity for the supported model. The model of the Independent Vacation as Evolving Itinerary suggests that much of the vacation itinerary experienced in independent travel is indeed unplanned, and that a desire to experience the unplanned is a key hedonic motive for independent travel. Rather than following a fixed itinerary, the itinerary of an independent vacation evolves as the vacation proceeds. The independent traveler takes advantage of serendipitous opportunities to experience a number of locations, attractions and activities that they had neither actively researched nor planned.

Details

Advances in Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-522-2

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Youngseek Kim and Seungahn Nah

The purpose of this paper is to examine how data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and resource factors influence internet researchers to share data…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and resource factors influence internet researchers to share data with other researchers outside their teams.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted to examine the extent to which data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and resource factors predicted internet researchers’ data sharing intentions and behaviors. The theorized model was tested using a structural equation modeling technique to analyze a total of 201 survey responses from the Association of Internet Researchers mailing list.

Findings

Results show that data reuse experience significantly influenced participants’ perception of benefit from data sharing and participants’ norm of data sharing. Belief structures regarding data sharing, including perceived career benefit and risk, and perceived effort, had significant associations with attitude toward data sharing, leading internet researchers to have greater data sharing intentions and behavior. The results also reveal that researchers’ norms for data sharing had a direct effect on data sharing intention. Furthermore, the results indicate that, while the perceived availability of data repository did not yield a positive impact on data sharing intention, it has a significant, direct, positive impact on researchers’ data sharing behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

This study validated its novel theorized model based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The study showed a holistic picture of how different data sharing factors, including data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and data repositories, influence internet researchers’ data sharing intentions and behaviors.

Practical implications

Data reuse experience, attitude toward and norm of data sharing, and the availability of data repository had either direct or indirect influence on internet researchers’ data sharing behaviors. Thus, professional associations, funding agencies, and academic institutions alike should promote academic cultures that value data sharing in order to create a virtuous cycle of reciprocity and encourage researchers to have positive attitudes toward/norms of data sharing; these cultures should be strengthened by the strong support of data repositories.

Originality/value

In line with prior scholarship concerning scientific data sharing, this study of internet researchers offers a map of scientific data sharing intentions and behaviors by examining the impacts of data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and data repositories together.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Wenzhi Zheng, Yenchun Jim Wu and Yue Lv

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between researchers’ social media (SM) behavior and their academic performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between researchers’ social media (SM) behavior and their academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 362 researchers was recruited from the colleges of management of 52 Chinese universities. A factor analysis of eight indices retrieved from the 362 data items was conducted. A total of 24 Chinese researchers were interviewed and given a robust test.

Findings

The results indicate that Chinese general social media (GSM) is insufficient to support academic research and it is difficult for scholars to enhance the visibility of their academic performance using GSM platforms, which can actually induce addiction. University resources, management systems, and working environment affect how scholars apply SM.

Research limitations/implications

The authors examined the researchers’ SM behavior by giving them a questionnaire and interview; however, this approach proved inadequate. The academic performance of researchers is affected by numerous factors, but the authors only considered SM behavior.

Practical implications

It is suggested that universities apply academic social media (ASM) indicators to measure researchers’ contributions so that they self-regulate their SM usage attitudes. Also, universities should also promote ASM platforms.

Originality/value

This study analyzed scholars’ GSM usage and academic performance, and the moderating effect of university level on the relationship between need for competence and relatedness and need for autonomy. This comprehensive analysis contributes to the scholarly SM usage literature.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Maria Kmita

The purpose of this paper is to address participants’ humorous provocations as a part of informal interactions between participants and researcher that can be treated just…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address participants’ humorous provocations as a part of informal interactions between participants and researcher that can be treated just like the research data. By means of autoethnographic analysis, the author explores the expectations of the researcher and participants that humour research entails and discusses how different expectations are revealed in participants’ provocations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an autoethnographic approach to discuss the informal interactions between participants and the researcher gathered during research into staffroom humour. The informal interactions in general and humour specifically were recorded, analysed, coded, interpreted and theorised just like the data on humour between participants. The theoretical framework used in the study combines Goffman’s (1959) version of symbolic interactionism and Solomon et al. (2006) idea of hybrid spaces.

Findings

The study shows the need for reconsideration of expectations entangled in humour research and proposes to be prepared for unexpected. Expecting unexpected can help stay open minded in the field and in interactions with participants and apply healthy distance towards own research and own expectations. The study shows that whenever certain behaviour was expected and different behaviour was delivered, there was a chance for certain behaviour being interpreted as provocations. Participants’ provocations can result from their own expectations about the research or what they think is expected from them by the researcher and thus they remain subject to different interpretations.

Research limitations/implications

Further research could investigate and discuss the role of humour in participant-researcher interactions in different research contexts and across different methodologies. Combining and analysing experiences of use of humour from both participants and researchers could allow for creating the guidelines in the use of humour in different research situations. Ethical challenges posed by informal interactions between researcher and participants could be explored further and suggestions as to how to protect the researcher, research and participants in such interactions could be developed.

Originality/value

This paper aims to be a starting point for a discussion about the understudied relationship between expectations humour research is entangled with and participants’ provocations. The study shows innovative approach to informal interactions between participants’ and researcher which are treated as research data and are theorised using original combination of symbolic interactionism and hybrid spaces. The study contributes to the qualitative research methodology by discussing the ethics of both using humour with participants and recording and analysing informal humorous interactions between participants and the researcher.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Yeon Kyoung Joo and Youngseek Kim

The purpose of this research is to investigate the factors that influence engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the factors that influence engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The data reuse behaviour model of engineering researchers was investigated by using a survey method. A national survey was distributed to engineering researchers in the USA, and a total of 193 researchers responded.

Findings

The results showed that perceived usefulness, perceived concerns and norms of data reuse have significant relationships with attitudes toward data reuse. Also, attitudes toward data reuse and the availability of data repositories were found to have significant influences on engineering researchers’ intention to reuse data.

Research limitations/implications

This research used a combined theoretical framework by integrating the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM). The combination of the TPB and the TAM effectively explained engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours by addressing individual motivations, norms and resource factors.

Practical implications

This research has practical implications for promoting more reliable and beneficial data reuse in the engineering community, including encouraging positive motivations toward data reuse, building community norms of data reuse and setting up more data repositories.

Originality value

As prior research on data reuse mainly used interviews, this research used a quantitative approach based on a combined theoretical framework and included diverse research constructs which were not tested in the previous research models. As one of the initial studies investigating data reuse behaviours in the engineering community, the current research provided a better understanding of data reuse behaviours and suggested possible ways to facilitate engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Youngseek Kim

This research investigates how the availabilities of both metadata standards and data repositories influence researchers' data reuse intentions either directly or…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates how the availabilities of both metadata standards and data repositories influence researchers' data reuse intentions either directly or indirectly as mediated by the norms of data reuse and their attitudes toward data reuse.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was employed to develop the research model of researchers' data reuse intentions, focusing on the roles of metadata standards, data repositories and norms of data reuse. The proposed research model was evaluated using the structural equation modeling (SEM) method based on the survey responses received from 811 STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) researchers in the United States.

Findings

This research found that the availabilities of both metadata standards and data repositories significantly affect STEM researchers' norm of data reuse, which influences their data reuse intentions as mediated by their attitudes toward data reuse. This research also found that both the availability of data repositories and the norm of data reuse have a direct influence on data reuse intentions and that norm of data reuse significantly increases the effect of attitude toward data reuse on data reuse intention as a moderator.

Research limitations/implications

The modified model of TPB provides a new perspective in apprehending the roles of resource facilitating conditions such as the availabilities of metadata standards and data repositories in an individual's attitude, norm and their behavioral intention to conduct a certain behavior.

Practical implications

This study suggests that scientific communities need to develop more supportive metadata standards and data repositories by considering their roles in enhancing the community norm of data reuse, which eventually lead to data reuse behaviors.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the mechanism of metadata standard and data repository in researchers' data reuse behaviors through their community norm of data reuse; this can help scientific communities and academic institutions to better support researchers in their data sharing and reuse behaviors.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-09-2020-0431

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Sanam Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed Rezaei Sharifabadi, Masoumeh Karbala Aghaie Kamran and Kimiz Dalkir

The purpose of this paper is to identify the triggers, strategies and outcomes of collaborative information-seeking behaviours of researchers on the ResearchGate social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the triggers, strategies and outcomes of collaborative information-seeking behaviours of researchers on the ResearchGate social networking site.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the population of researchers who use ResearchGate. The sample was limited to the Ph.D. students and assistant professors in the library and information science domain. Qualitative interviews were used for data collection.

Findings

Based on the findings of the study, informal communications and complex information needs lead to a decision to use collaborative information-seeking behaviour. Also, easy access to sources of information and finding relevant information were the major positive factors contributing to collaborative information-seeking behaviour of the ResearchGate users. Users moved from collaborative Q&A strategies to sharing information, synthesising information and networking strategies based on their needs. Analysis of information-seeking behaviour showed that ResearchGate users bridged the information gap by internalizing new knowledge, making collaborative decisions and increasing their work's visibility.

Originality/value

As one of the initial studies on the collaborative information-seeking behaviour of ResearchGate users, this study provides a holistic picture of different triggers that affect researchers' information-seeking on ResearchGate.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

David Nicholas, Ian Rowlands, Paul Huntington, Hamid R. Jamali and Patricia Hernández Salazar

The purpose of this paper is to present some of the results of the project “Evaluating the usage and impact of e‐journals in the UK”. The particular research reported here…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present some of the results of the project “Evaluating the usage and impact of e‐journals in the UK”. The particular research reported here evaluated the use of the ScienceDirect journals database with regard to Life Sciences, Economics, Chemistry, Earth & Environmental Sciences and Physics by ten major UK research institutions. The aim of the study is to investigate researchers' digital behaviour, and to ascertain whether their use and behaviours varied by subjects and disciplines, or in relation to the institutions in which they worked.

Design/methodology/approach

Raw logs for ScienceDirect were obtained for the period January to April 2007, were subject to deep log techniques and analysed using the Software Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).

Findings

Typically, 5 per cent of the ScienceDirect journals viewed accounted for a third to half of all use. A high proportion of researchers entered the ScienceDirect site via a third‐party site, and this was especially so in the case of the Life Sciences and in the highest‐ranked research institutions. There were significant institutional and subject differences in information‐seeking behaviour. In the most research‐intensive institutions, per capita journal use was highest and their users spent much less time on each visit. There were significant differences of the order of 100‐300 per cent in the age of material viewed between subjects and institutions. Just four months after ScienceDirect content was opened to Google indexing, a third of traffic to the site's Physics journals came via that route.

Originality/value

The research is one of the very few studies to investigate subject and institutional differences with regard to the information seeking and use of UK researchers, something UK academic librarians should particularly welcome.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Lars Moksness and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to understand how attitudes, norms (injunctive and descriptive) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) (capacity and autonomy) influence the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how attitudes, norms (injunctive and descriptive) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) (capacity and autonomy) influence the intention to publish open access (OA), and how personal innovativeness in information technology affects attitude and PBC.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an integrated and extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework within a cross-sectional survey design. The sample consists of researchers at a Norwegian university, and data are collected digitally via e-mail invitation and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study determines that attitude is the strongest predictor of the intention to publish OA, followed by injunctive and descriptive social norms, and PBC capacity and autonomy. All factors positively influence intention apart from PBC autonomy, which has a negative effect.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations include: a relatively small sample size, self-reported data and employing intention, not behavior, as the ultimate dependent variable.

Practical implications

This research contributes with a deeper understanding of what drives the intention to publish OA research articles, and how innovativeness affects attitudes and PBC autonomy. Support is found for an extended TPB model with decomposed normative and PBC components. This knowledge is essential in creating an impetus for systematic research on OA publishing behavior.

Originality/value

Theory-driven research into understanding OA publishing behavior is rare. Decomposing the normative and PBC constructs is uncommon in TPB research, and a novel approach in OA research. Personal innovativeness has not been explored previously in relation to OA publishing.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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