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Article

Youngseek Kim

This research investigates how the availabilities of both metadata standards and data repositories influence researchers' data reuse intentions either directly or…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates how the availabilities of both metadata standards and data repositories influence researchers' data reuse intentions either directly or indirectly as mediated by the norms of data reuse and their attitudes toward data reuse.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was employed to develop the research model of researchers' data reuse intentions, focusing on the roles of metadata standards, data repositories and norms of data reuse. The proposed research model was evaluated using the structural equation modeling (SEM) method based on the survey responses received from 811 STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) researchers in the United States.

Findings

This research found that the availabilities of both metadata standards and data repositories significantly affect STEM researchers' norm of data reuse, which influences their data reuse intentions as mediated by their attitudes toward data reuse. This research also found that both the availability of data repositories and the norm of data reuse have a direct influence on data reuse intentions and that norm of data reuse significantly increases the effect of attitude toward data reuse on data reuse intention as a moderator.

Research limitations/implications

The modified model of TPB provides a new perspective in apprehending the roles of resource facilitating conditions such as the availabilities of metadata standards and data repositories in an individual's attitude, norm and their behavioral intention to conduct a certain behavior.

Practical implications

This study suggests that scientific communities need to develop more supportive metadata standards and data repositories by considering their roles in enhancing the community norm of data reuse, which eventually lead to data reuse behaviors.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the mechanism of metadata standard and data repository in researchers' data reuse behaviors through their community norm of data reuse; this can help scientific communities and academic institutions to better support researchers in their data sharing and reuse behaviors.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-09-2020-0431

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article

Ayoung Yoon and Youngseek Kim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how scientists’ prior data-reuse experience affects their data-sharing intention by updating diverse attitudinal, control and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how scientists’ prior data-reuse experience affects their data-sharing intention by updating diverse attitudinal, control and normative beliefs about data sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a survey method and the research model was evaluated by applying structural equation modelling to 476 survey responses from biological scientists in the USA.

Findings

The results show that prior data-reuse experience significantly increases the perceived community and career benefits and subjective norms of data sharing and significantly decreases the perceived risk and effort involved in data sharing. The perceived community benefits and subjective norms of data sharing positively influence scientists’ data-sharing intention, whereas the perceived risk and effort negatively influence scientists’ data-sharing intention.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the theory of planned behaviour, the research model was developed by connecting scientists’ prior data-reuse experience and data-sharing intention mediated through diverse attitudinal, control and normative perceptions of data sharing.

Practical implications

This research suggests that to facilitate scientists’ data-sharing behaviours, data reuse needs to be encouraged. Data sharing and reuse are interconnected, so scientists’ data sharing can be better promoted by providing them with data-reuse experience.

Originality/value

This is one of the initial studies examining the relationship between data-reuse experience and data-sharing behaviour, and it considered the following mediating factors: perceived community benefit, career benefit, career risk, effort and subjective norm of data sharing. This research provides an advanced investigation of data-sharing behaviour in the relationship with data-reuse experience and suggests significant implications for fostering data-sharing behaviour.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

Ayoung Yoon and Yoo Young Lee

The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively examine factors of trust in data reuse from the reusers’ perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively examine factors of trust in data reuse from the reusers’ perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a survey method to test the proposed hypotheses and to empirically evaluate the research model, which was developed to examine the relationship each factor of trust has with reusers’ actual trust during data reuse.

Findings

This study found that the data producer (H1) and data quality (H3) were significant, as predicted, while scholarly community (H3) and data intermediary (H4) were not significantly related to reusers’ trust in data.

Research limitations/implications

Further disciplinary specific examinations should be conducted to complement the study findings and fully generalize the study findings.

Practical implications

The study finding presents the need for engaging data producers in the process of data curation, preferably beginning in the early stages and encouraging them to work with curation professionals to ensure data management quality. The study finding also suggests the need for re-defining the boundaries of current curation work or collaborating with other professionals who can perform data quality assessment that is related to scientific and methodological rigor.

Originality/value

By analyzing theoretical concepts in empirical research and validating the factors of trust, this study fills this gap in the data reuse literature.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article

Yeon Kyoung Joo and Youngseek Kim

The purpose of this research is to investigate the factors that influence engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the factors that influence engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The data reuse behaviour model of engineering researchers was investigated by using a survey method. A national survey was distributed to engineering researchers in the USA, and a total of 193 researchers responded.

Findings

The results showed that perceived usefulness, perceived concerns and norms of data reuse have significant relationships with attitudes toward data reuse. Also, attitudes toward data reuse and the availability of data repositories were found to have significant influences on engineering researchers’ intention to reuse data.

Research limitations/implications

This research used a combined theoretical framework by integrating the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM). The combination of the TPB and the TAM effectively explained engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours by addressing individual motivations, norms and resource factors.

Practical implications

This research has practical implications for promoting more reliable and beneficial data reuse in the engineering community, including encouraging positive motivations toward data reuse, building community norms of data reuse and setting up more data repositories.

Originality value

As prior research on data reuse mainly used interviews, this research used a quantitative approach based on a combined theoretical framework and included diverse research constructs which were not tested in the previous research models. As one of the initial studies investigating data reuse behaviours in the engineering community, the current research provided a better understanding of data reuse behaviours and suggested possible ways to facilitate engineering researchers’ data reuse behaviours.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

Soohyung Joo, Sujin Kim and Youngseek Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine how health scientists’ attitudinal, social, and resource factors affect their data reuse behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how health scientists’ attitudinal, social, and resource factors affect their data reuse behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was utilized to investigate to what extent attitudinal, social, and resource factors influence health scientists’ data reuse behaviors. The health scientists’ data reuse research model was validated by using partial least squares (PLS) based structural equation modeling technique with a total of 161 health scientists in the USA.

Findings

The analysis results showed that health scientists’ data reuse intentions are driven by attitude toward data reuse, community norm of data reuse, disciplinary research climate, and organizational support factors. This research also found that both perceived usefulness of data reuse and perceived concern involved in data reuse have significant influences on health scientists’ attitude toward data reuse.

Research limitations/implications

This research evaluated its newly proposed research model based on the theory of planned behavior using a sample from the community of scientists’ scholar database. This research showed an overall picture of how attitudinal, social, and resource factors influence health scientists’ data reuse behaviors. This research is limited due to its sample size and low response rate, so this study is considered as an exploratory study rather than a confirmatory study.

Practical implications

This research suggested for health science research communities, academic institutions, and libraries that diverse strategies need to be utilized to promote health scientists’ data reuse behaviors.

Originality/value

This research is one of initial studies in scientific data reuse which provided a holistic map about health scientists’ data sharing behaviors. The findings of this study provide the groundwork for strategies to facilitate data reuse practice in health science areas.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article

Ixchel M. Faniel, Rebecca D. Frank and Elizabeth Yakel

Taking the researchers’ perspective, the purpose of this paper is to examine the types of context information needed to preserve data’s meaning in ways that support data reuse.

Abstract

Purpose

Taking the researchers’ perspective, the purpose of this paper is to examine the types of context information needed to preserve data’s meaning in ways that support data reuse.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a qualitative study of 105 researchers from three disciplinary communities: quantitative social science, archaeology and zoology. The study focused on researchers’ most recent data reuse experience, particularly what they needed when deciding whether to reuse data.

Findings

Findings show that researchers mentioned 12 types of context information across three broad categories: data production information (data collection, specimen and artifact, data producer, data analysis, missing data, and research objectives); repository information (provenance, reputation and history, curation and digitization); and data reuse information (prior reuse, advice on reuse and terms of use).

Originality/value

This paper extends digital curation conversations to include the preservation of context as well as content to facilitate data reuse. When compared to prior research, findings show that there is some generalizability with respect to the types of context needed across different disciplines and data sharing and reuse environments. It also introduces several new context types. Relying on the perspective of researchers offers a more nuanced view that shows the importance of the different context types for each discipline and the ways disciplinary members thought about them. Both data producers and curators can benefit from knowing what to capture and manage during data collection and deposit into a repository.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Content available
Article

Genya Morgan O’Gara, Liz Woolcott, Elizabeth Joan Kelly, Caroline Muglia, Ayla Stein and Santi Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the initial top-level findings of a year-long comprehensive needs assessment, conducted with the digital library community, to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the initial top-level findings of a year-long comprehensive needs assessment, conducted with the digital library community, to reveal reuse assessment practices and requirements for digital assets held by cultural heritage and research organizations. The type of assessment examined is in contrast to traditional library analytics, and does not focus on access statistics, but rather on how users utilize and transform unique materials from digital collections.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a variety of investigative approaches to explore the current landscape, and future needs, of digital library reuse assessment. This includes the development and analysis of pre- and post-study surveys, in-person and virtual focus group sessions, a literature review, and the incorporation of community and advisory board feedback.

Findings

The digital library community is searching for ways to better understand how materials are reused and repurposed. This paper shares the initial quantitative and qualitative analysis and results of a community needs assessment conducted in 2017 and 2018 that illuminates the current and hoped for landscape of digital library reuse assessment, its strengths, weaknesses and community applications.

Originality/value

In so far as the authors are aware, this is the first paper to examine with a broad lens the reuse assessment needs of the digital library community. The preliminary analysis and initial findings have not been previously published.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article

Jihyun Kim, Kara Suzuka and Elizabeth Yakel

This research investigated the reuse of Video Records of Practice (VRPs) – i.e. a type of qualitative data documenting teaching and learning in educational settings. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigated the reuse of Video Records of Practice (VRPs) – i.e. a type of qualitative data documenting teaching and learning in educational settings. It studied how reusers' purposes and experience-level with VRP reuse influence the importance of various VRP selection criteria and how these differ depending on whether the main goal for reuse was research or teaching. It also examined whether two different dimensions of qualitative research – reflexivity and context – were factors in VRP reuse.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on surveys of reusers at four VRP repositories. Questions were based on the literature and interviews with VRP reusers. The response rate was 20.6% (180 of 872 distributed surveys). This paper focused on 126 respondents who affirmatively responded they reused VRPs from a repository.

Findings

Researchers using VRPs were primarily interested in examining a broad range of processes in education and studying/improving ways to measure differences and growth in education. Reusers with teaching goals were commonly interested in VRPs to engage learners in showing examples/exemplars of – and reflecting on – teaching and learning. These differences between research and teaching led to varied expectations about VRPs, such as the amount of content needed and necessary contextual information to support reuse.

Research limitations/implications

While repositories focus on exposing content, understanding and communicating certain qualities of that content can help reusers identify VRPs and align goals with selection decisions.

Originality/value

Although qualitative data are increasingly reused, research has rarely focused on identifying how qualitative data reusers employ selection criteria. This study focused on VRPs as one type of qualitative data and identified the attributes of VRPs that reusers perceived to be important during selection. These will help VRP repositories determine which metadata and documentation meet reusers' goals.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article

Angela P. Murillo

The purpose of this study is to examine the information needs of earth and environmental scientists regarding how they determine data reusability and relevance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the information needs of earth and environmental scientists regarding how they determine data reusability and relevance. Additionally, this study provides strategies for the development of data collections and recommendations for data management and curation for information professionals working alongside researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multi-phase mixed-method approach. The test environment is the DataONE data repository. Phase 1 includes a qualitative and quantitative content analysis of deposited data. Phase 2 consists of a quasi-experiment think-aloud study. This paper reports mainly on Phase 2.

Findings

This study identifies earth and environmental scientists’ information needs to determine data reusability. The findings include a need for information regarding research methods, instruments and data descriptions when determining data reusability, as well as a restructuring of data abstracts. Additional findings include reorganizing of the data record layout and data citation information.

Research limitations/implications

While this study was limited to earth and environmental science data, the findings provide feedback for scientists in other disciplines, as earth and environmental science is a highly interdisciplinary scientific domain that pulls from many disciplines, including biology, ecology and geology, and additionally there has been a significant increase in interdisciplinary research in many scientific fields.

Practical implications

The practical implications include concrete feedback to data librarians, data curators and repository managers, as well as other information professionals as to the information needs of scientists reusing data. The suggestions could be implemented to improve consultative practices when working alongside scientists regarding data deposition and data creation. These suggestions could improve policies for data repositories through direct feedback from scientists. These suggestions could be implemented to improve how data repositories are created and what should be considered mandatory information and secondary information to improve the reusability of data.

Social implications

By examining the information needs of earth and environmental scientists reusing data, this study provides feedback that could change current practices in data deposition, which ultimately could improve the potentiality of data reuse.

Originality/value

While there has been research conducted on data sharing and reuse, this study provides more detailed granularity regarding what information is needed to determine reusability. This study sets itself apart by not focusing on social motivators and demotivators, but by focusing on information provided in a data record.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

Keywords

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Article

Youngseek Kim and Seungahn Nah

The purpose of this paper is to examine how data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and resource factors influence internet researchers to share data

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and resource factors influence internet researchers to share data with other researchers outside their teams.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted to examine the extent to which data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and resource factors predicted internet researchers’ data sharing intentions and behaviors. The theorized model was tested using a structural equation modeling technique to analyze a total of 201 survey responses from the Association of Internet Researchers mailing list.

Findings

Results show that data reuse experience significantly influenced participants’ perception of benefit from data sharing and participants’ norm of data sharing. Belief structures regarding data sharing, including perceived career benefit and risk, and perceived effort, had significant associations with attitude toward data sharing, leading internet researchers to have greater data sharing intentions and behavior. The results also reveal that researchers’ norms for data sharing had a direct effect on data sharing intention. Furthermore, the results indicate that, while the perceived availability of data repository did not yield a positive impact on data sharing intention, it has a significant, direct, positive impact on researchers’ data sharing behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

This study validated its novel theorized model based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The study showed a holistic picture of how different data sharing factors, including data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and data repositories, influence internet researchers’ data sharing intentions and behaviors.

Practical implications

Data reuse experience, attitude toward and norm of data sharing, and the availability of data repository had either direct or indirect influence on internet researchers’ data sharing behaviors. Thus, professional associations, funding agencies, and academic institutions alike should promote academic cultures that value data sharing in order to create a virtuous cycle of reciprocity and encourage researchers to have positive attitudes toward/norms of data sharing; these cultures should be strengthened by the strong support of data repositories.

Originality/value

In line with prior scholarship concerning scientific data sharing, this study of internet researchers offers a map of scientific data sharing intentions and behaviors by examining the impacts of data reuse experience, attitudinal beliefs, social norms, and data repositories together.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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