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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Kia J. Bentley, Cory R. Cummings, Rachel C. Casey and Christopher P. Kogut

The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of shared decision making, the initial aim of the study was to understand how psychiatrists-in-training defined themselves as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of shared decision making, the initial aim of the study was to understand how psychiatrists-in-training defined themselves as unique among physicians with an eye on how professional identity might shape approach to care. The second aim was to use those definitions and descriptions related to professional identity and tailor a brief training module to promote awareness of the shared decision making model.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors do this by first conducting focus groups to ascertain how psychiatric residents characterize their professional identity and unique disciplinary characteristics. The authors then designed a brief training session that exploits the relationship between how they define themselves as physicians and how they approach clinical decision making with patients.

Findings

Three major themes that emerged from the focus group data: the central role of societal and treatment contexts in shaping their professional identity and approaches to care, a professional identity characterized by a great sense of pride, and a strong commitment to systematic decision-making processes in practice. While the assessment of the training module is preliminary and lacks rigor for any generalizability or statements of causality, responses likely affirm the training tailored around professional identity as a possible vehicle for effective exposure to the concept of shared decision making and served as a useful avenue for self-reflection about needed changes to more fully embrace the practice.

Research limitations/implications

More inquiry may be needed into the association between trust, relationship longevity and power and paternalism, as a way to bring greater insight into the adoption of shared decision making. Future research will have to investigate whether or not including identity-related content is empirically connected to successful training on shared decision making. Likewise, future research should also look at the reciprocal impact of effectively using shared decision making on the affirmation of professional identity among psychiatrists, and indeed all who embrace patient-centered care.

Originality/value

This is the one of the first papers to investigate issues of professional identity among psychiatry residents, and also among the first papers to consider the relationship between professional identity and use of shared decision making.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Casey Burkholder, Katie MacEntee, April Mandrona, Amelia Thorpe and Pride/Swell Pride/Swell

The authors explore the coproduction of a digital archive with 50 2SLGBTQ+ youth across Atlantic Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to catalyze broader public…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore the coproduction of a digital archive with 50 2SLGBTQ+ youth across Atlantic Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to catalyze broader public participation in understanding 2SLGBTQ+ youth-led activism in this place and time through art production.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a mail-based participatory visual research project and an examination of collage, zines and DIY facemasks, the authors highlight how the production, sharing and archiving of youth-produced art adds to methodological discussions of exhibiting and digital archiving with 2SLGBTQ+ youth as a form of activist intervention.

Findings

In reflexively examining the cocuration of art through social media and project website, the authors argue that coproducing digital archives is an important part of knowledge mobilization. Also, the authors consider how the work has been interacted with by a broader public, so far in an exclusively celebratory manner and note the benefits and challenges of this type of engagement to the youth and to the understandings of 2SLGBTQ+ youth archives.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that these modes of engaging in participatory visual research at a distance offer original contributions in relation to how participation can be understood in a digital and mail-based project. The authors see participant control of how to share works within digital archives as a contribution to the understanding of people's capacity to negotiate and take ownership of these spaces. These strategies are participant-centered and suggest ways that archiving can be made more accessible, especially when working with communities who are socially marginalized or otherwise excluded from the archival process.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2017

Maya Manian

As numerous scholars have noted, the law takes a strikingly incoherent approach to adolescent reproduction. States overwhelmingly allow a teenage girl to independently consent to…

Abstract

As numerous scholars have noted, the law takes a strikingly incoherent approach to adolescent reproduction. States overwhelmingly allow a teenage girl to independently consent to pregnancy care and medical treatment for her child, and even to give up her child for adoption, all without notice to her parents, but require parental notice or consent for abortion. This chapter argues that this oft-noted contradiction in the law on teenage reproductive decision-making is in fact not as contradictory as it first appears. A closer look at the law’s apparently conflicting approaches to teenage abortion and teenage childbirth exposes common ground that scholars have overlooked. The chapter compares the full spectrum of minors’ reproductive rights and unmasks deep similarities in the law on adolescent reproduction – in particular an undercurrent of desire to punish (female) teenage sexuality, whether pregnant girls choose abortion or childbirth. It demonstrates that in practice, the law undermines adolescents’ reproductive rights, whichever path of pregnancy resolution they choose. At the same time that the law thwarts adolescents’ access to abortion care, it also fails to protect adolescents’ rights as parents. The analysis shows that these two superficially conflicting sets of rules in fact work in tandem to enforce a traditional gender script – that self-sacrificing mothers should give birth and give up their infants to better circumstances, no matter the emotional costs to themselves. This chapter also suggests novel policy solutions to the difficulties posed by adolescent reproduction by urging reforms that look to third parties other than parents or the State to better support adolescent decision-making relating to pregnancy and parenting.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-344-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Lucy Tinning, Kate Harman, Rachel Lee and June Brown

Promoting mental health and meeting the needs of the large numbers of the general public with problems of anxiety and depression is a big challenge. Particular difficulties are…

Abstract

Promoting mental health and meeting the needs of the large numbers of the general public with problems of anxiety and depression is a big challenge. Particular difficulties are the low capacity of the therapy services and the reluctance of the general public to seek help. The aim of this study was to compare the attendance, effectiveness and characteristics of participants self‐referring to six different psycho‐educational workshops, each using non‐diagnostic titles: self‐confidence; stress; sleep; relationships; happiness; and anger. The series of day‐long workshops ran for one year and were offered to members of the general public in south east London. Over a quarter had not previously sought help from their GP. The take‐up rates for the self‐confidence, sleep and anger workshops were highest and one month after attending these workshops, participants reported significantly lower depression and distress. It was concluded that a self‐referral route to some day‐long workshops can attract quite large numbers of the general public and provide access to effective psychological treatment. These workshops can be used as an effective way of promoting mental health and improving the provision of evidence‐based mental health treatment in the community, possibly within the Improving Access to Psychological Treatments (IAPT) programme in the UK.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Sue Baines and Liz Robson

The government wants more people to start up new small enterprises. In practice, this is likely to mean more sole traders without employees, a heterogeneous group sometimes…

1848

Abstract

The government wants more people to start up new small enterprises. In practice, this is likely to mean more sole traders without employees, a heterogeneous group sometimes identified with, and sometimes distinguished from, small enterprises. In this paper, we confront that contradiction, drawing upon academic and policy‐oriented writing on small firms and upon a wider literature on labour markets and employment trends. Being self‐employed is not synonymous with being enterprising, but most self‐employed people will need skills associated with enterprise to survive. We overview the cultural sector, which has been identified as a key growth sector for jobs and one in which very small businesses and self‐employed individuals predominate. We explore in depth the “enterprising” behaviour of a subgroup of the cultural sector, people offering creative services to the print and broadcast media on a self‐employed basis. Our particular focus is upon how they form and manage working relationships. The expectation was that, while few would formally become employers, collaborative, colleague‐like working patterns would be adopted to avoid isolation and overcome the vulnerability of small size. This was true, but only for a very small group. For the most part, links with other self‐employed people were tentative and fraught with suspicion. Distrust was pervasive and often coexisted painfully with a desire to form new links for information seeking, sociability and to combat the commercial disadvantages of working alone. Typically, the most important working relationships were with employees of client companies, and many were determined to see these links as longterm, personal and not purely commercial. There was a marked lack of skills in negotiating and marketing.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Natalie Coers, Nicole Stedman, Grady Roberts, Allen Wysocki and Hannah Carter

The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of leadership development as experienced by non-government organization (NGO) executive leaders in international…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of leadership development as experienced by non-government organization (NGO) executive leaders in international agricultural development. Data were collected from twelve executive NGO leaders through in-depth interviews to understand the textural and structural essences of the participants’ lived experiences of leadership development. Findings indicated the integral role of mentoring in leadership development prior to obtaining an executive leadership role and supported the conceptual model inclusive of mentoring as a mediating factor of efficacious leadership development. The study provided implications and future research recommendations for executive leaders in international agricultural development, as well as for leadership educators and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of…

16335

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2023

Hazel T. Biana

Various philosophers and thinkers have discussed the importance of thinking and philosophising about the concept of ‘place’. A necessary structure of human experience, place is…

Abstract

Various philosophers and thinkers have discussed the importance of thinking and philosophising about the concept of ‘place’. A necessary structure of human experience, place is vital to the very foundation of human experience. More than the geography or arrangement of places, place is a concept that moulds human experience and contributes to understanding oneself and the world. Place has also been used to explain political motivations and issues such as citizenship, diaspora and migration. Despite its importance, place has not been problematised enough and has been neglected in studies of intersectionality. For instance, the role and influence of place in a person's diversity wheel and the interlocking web of oppressive structures have been reduced to either racial, class or gender categories. As a result, current critical theories fall short in drawing up the effects of place on intersectionality. This chapter, therefore, proposes the need to develop a critical place theory. It highlights the role that place-aspects play in the oppression and marginalisation of individuals. Moreover, it also examines the relatively new concept of placism as an analytical framework that can be used to explain varying oppressive placial structures.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and…

31605

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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