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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Fei Fan

Celebrity endorsement is common in the marketing communications context, especially in the Asian market. Thanks to the popularity of online DIY celebrities, many marketing…

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Abstract

Purpose

Celebrity endorsement is common in the marketing communications context, especially in the Asian market. Thanks to the popularity of online DIY celebrities, many marketing communications practitioners have started to involve such celebrities in brand and product endorsement strategies. However, few existing studies have compared the endorsement persuasiveness of online DIY celebrity endorsers with traditional celebrity endorsers, particularly in the Asian market. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to fill the literature gap by examining how consumers perceive and evaluate online DIY and traditional celebrity endorsers.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth personal interviews were conducted with 15 interviewees with a median age of 23. They were asked to report their overall evaluations and attitudes toward online DIY celebrity endorsers and traditional celebrity endorsers, and their respective endorsement strategies.

Findings

Although the popularity of online DIY celebrities is growing in China, they received a lower level of appreciation from interviewees than traditional celebrities. The persuasiveness of online DIY celebrity endorsers was not as effective as that of traditional celebrity endorsers. Interviewees even held an overall negative attitude toward online DIY celebrities and their endorsements. Interviewees perceived traditional celebrity endorsers more positively, and their endorsements to be more effective, than online DIY celebrity endorsers.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size may constrain any generalization to be drawn from the findings. Future studies are suggested using survey and experiment methodology to further test and compare the persuasiveness of online DIY and traditional celebrity endorsement.

Practical implications

We suggest communications practitioners continue to use traditional celebrities to improve overall brand image and enhance the target audience’s purchase intention as the exploratory study reveals that audiences have an overall positive experience with traditional celebrities, instead of online DIY celebrities. If online DIY celebrities are preferred in communications strategies, we suggest practitioners carefully select qualified online DIY celebrity endorsers based on image congruence between such online DIY celebrities and the product category in that audiences in the exploratory study are quite cautious when exposed to product endorsement messages from online DIY celebrities. Besides this, audiences have more confidence in product endorsement if there is a fit between online DIY celebrities’ expertise and the endorsed product type.

Originality/value

This is the first qualitative study on consumers’ perception of product endorsement at the level of online DIY and traditional celebrity endorsers.

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Paul G. Oliver

The aim of this paper is to aid the DIY artist in moving towards sustainability through the use of new technologies, which will be achieved by defining DIY music culture…

3780

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to aid the DIY artist in moving towards sustainability through the use of new technologies, which will be achieved by defining DIY music culture, identifying the creative and business needs of an artist as well as establishing a model for artists to be self‐sufficient.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology consisted of a mixture of unstructured interviews, such as e‐mail, telephone and face‐to‐face. A total of 15 interviews were conducted with DIY artists from local music scenes around the UK.

Findings

The DIY musicology model is a foundation for the DIY artist to be self‐sufficient through the three main perspectives: artistic process, managerial process and information systems.

Research limitations/implications

Many artists and managers continue in their struggle to be independently sustainable, therefore it is necessary to continue this research on a wider scale.

Practical implications

By gaining a more in‐depth understanding of the sub‐sectors within the music industries, artists and managers can understand more about how to manage their own creative activities or projects.

Social implications

Through a strong DIY ethic, with an emphasis on creativity and self‐management, a clear understanding of local music scenes helps to identify one of the key sub‐sectors of the music industries as well as demonstrate that sub‐cultures have value.

Originality/value

The paper discusses issues of sustainability within local music scenes from the perspective of the DIY artist, which is a new area of academic research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Siobhan Hatton-Jones and Min Teah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the accelerated growth within the Australian do-it-yourself (DIY) market and discusses the factors and drivers affecting consumer…

2380

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the accelerated growth within the Australian do-it-yourself (DIY) market and discusses the factors and drivers affecting consumer motivations to engage in such assembly tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, evaluations and critical analysis of the DIY industry was being formulated by drawing on real life brands and examples. An analysis of various DIY retail strategies and DIY decking companies was synthesised to provide insights into the DIY industry.

Findings

The insights into the industry outlines the changing consumer attitudes and motivations towards DIY and decking tasks. The findings on an evolving DIY industry, in particular the decking market demonstrate useful implications for academics, policy makers and brand practitioners.

Originality/value

There have been little industry studies that delve into specifically decking products. Considering the vast increase in homeware, renovations, and gardening, the study provides insights from various case studies into the strategies undertaken by Australian and global companies. In addition, the majority of studies undertaken have also been concerned with the intrinsic motivations of consumers and not necessarily the extrinsic effect that brands and retailers advertently and inadvertently communicate and signal to consumers of DIY products.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Elif Üstündağlı Erten and Ebru Belkıs Güzeloğlu

In this study, it is aimed to examine do-it-yourself (DIY) practices from sustainable and entrepreneurship perspectives and to understand how transformation mechanism…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, it is aimed to examine do-it-yourself (DIY) practices from sustainable and entrepreneurship perspectives and to understand how transformation mechanism works in between altruistic and utilitarian tendencies in shared economy market conditions. Meaning, material and competency of practice theory will be indicative in explaining transformation of existing practices, how practice is transformed and diffused in market ecosystem through the introduction of new objects and opportunities to better understand how values and meanings change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a phenomenological research interested in explaining contingency of sustainability in between altruistic and market conditions in shared economy ecosystem through DIY practices. The sample of this study is made up of 15 participants actively carrying out DIY activities. Data is analysed with MAXQDA Analytics Pro 2018 program through grounded coding technique.

Findings

DIYers' relationship with market results them to create roles subject to their dependence on altruistic values of sustainability and their stance to anti-consumption in between alternative and mainstream economy. When they converge to the market, DIY activities turn into medium of marketing activities. When they diverge from the market, they become “transformers” embracing principles of shared economy. Contingency appears depending on three conditions: one is related with active participation in DIY or market practices. Second is related with occupation status that DIYers have. Third is related with competence that active DIYers have.

Research limitations/implications

This study is aimed only at active participants. Therefore, it is possible to see the effects of altruistic and market behaviour more clearly. However, this group represents a minor group that will make it possible to comment on a small group. This is one of the limitations of this study.

Originality/value

In the study, proximity and distance to mainstream market condition are taken as the basis and market structure is taken as an agent. By this way, DIYers' activities evaluated not only from social and economical perspective but also their transformation compared to capitalist market conditions challenging altruistic values of DIY, sustainability and sharing economy. Thus, this study is evaluating sustainability, shared economy and DIY not as an entity but as a process.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Wendy Ritz, Marco Wolf and Shaun McQuitty

This paper aims to examine small business’ participation in digital marketing and to integrate the do-it-yourself (DIY) behavior model and technology acceptance model…

13203

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine small business’ participation in digital marketing and to integrate the do-it-yourself (DIY) behavior model and technology acceptance model (TAM) so as to explore the motivations and expected outcomes of such participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 250 small business owners/managers who do their own digital promotion are collected through an online survey. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the relationships between the models.

Findings

The results contribute to the understanding of small business’ digital marketing behavior by finding support for the idea that the technological benefits may not be the only motivators for small business owner/managers who undertake digital marketing. Moreover, and perhaps more importantly, the authors find that the DIY behavior model applies to small business owner/managers who must perform tasks that require specialized knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research are that the motivations to undertake digital marketing are limited to those contained in the DIY and TAM models, and the sample may not be representative of all owners and managers who perform digital marketing for their small businesses. Therefore, future research is needed to determine if further motivations to conduct digital marketing exist and whether other samples produce the same interpretations.

Originality/value

This study presents empirical evidence supporting the application of the DIY model to a context outside of home-repair and extends the understanding of digital footprint differences between large and small businesses.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Carley Foster

This paper reports findings from a small scale study exploring the role gender plays in the interactions between customers and front‐line staff in DIY retailing. Drawing…

2362

Abstract

This paper reports findings from a small scale study exploring the role gender plays in the interactions between customers and front‐line staff in DIY retailing. Drawing on materials gathered through observations, informal discussions with staff and focus groups, this study suggests that “maleness” pervades many aspects of DIY retailing. For the respondents the image of the case retailer, B&Q, and the products sold had male connotations. Furthermore, male customers perceived male customer‐facing staff to have better knowledge of technical DIY than female employees, even though this was not always the case. Given the rising interest from women in home improvements, it would appear that measures need to be put in place to create a more “inclusive” DIY store environment for female customers, and one that challenges the stereotypical assumptions held by many male home improvement customers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Colin C. Williams

Reflecting the broader “cultural turn” in retail studies, recent surveys of do‐it‐yourself (DIY) consumers have emphasised human agency rather than economic constraints…

4886

Abstract

Reflecting the broader “cultural turn” in retail studies, recent surveys of do‐it‐yourself (DIY) consumers have emphasised human agency rather than economic constraints when explaining their motives for purchasing DIY products. The aim of this paper, however, is to evaluate critically this agency‐oriented interpretation of the DIY retail market. Analysing evidence from English urban areas, it is shown that consumers' reasons for acquiring DIY products can be neither reduced simply to a lifestyle choice and nor can their behaviour be explained merely in terms of economic constraints. Such either/or thinking obfuscates how both co‐exist in people's motives and combine in contrasting ways in different populations. To transcend and reconcile these contrasting explanations, a both/and approach is thus adopted here that recognises how economic necessity and choice are entangled in rationales for participation in DIY. The paper concludes by exploring the wider implications of this finding for the economy/culture debates in retail studies.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

David Leaver and Hassan Al‐Zubaidi

Explains that UK consumers currently spend over £9 billion on do‐it‐yourself (DIY) home improvement products. States that in the 1980s this was the UK’s fastest growing…

1120

Abstract

Explains that UK consumers currently spend over £9 billion on do‐it‐yourself (DIY) home improvement products. States that in the 1980s this was the UK’s fastest growing major retail sector, and the booming UK housing market, especially the number of house moves, was widely thought to be the main stimulus for this growth. Reveals that the annual number of house moves has fallen by 50 per cent since 1988 but the DIY market has still grown, which suggests that the link between DIY and the housing market has either changed or is not as strong as previously believed. Reassesses the major factors which affected the DIY market in the 1980s through data analysis and multiple regression techniques. Suggests from the results that the effect of house moves on the DIY market is less than conventional wisdom would indicate. Notes that the most significant factors have been identified and are being used in a five‐year forecast which shows growth in line with increases in the general economy in a new, mature DIY market. Concludes that the results highlight the care needed when basing forecasts on a single factor which may no longer be valid.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Stephen Fox

There has been little explicit consideration of do‐it‐yourself (DIY) in previous manufacturing literature. This may be because traditional DIY is an outlet for physical…

1436

Abstract

Purpose

There has been little explicit consideration of do‐it‐yourself (DIY) in previous manufacturing literature. This may be because traditional DIY is an outlet for physical goods that are made‐to‐forecast, such as boats kits for self‐assembly and personal use. However, since the beginning of the twenty‐first century, DIY has extended to the invention and the sale of physical goods, as well as their assembly and use. The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the manufacturing literature by providing an analysis of DIY invention and production of physical goods for use or sale (new‐DIY paradigm).

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review related to DIY invention and production of physical goods for use or sale; and its differences with the existing paradigm for creating physical goods: including enabling technologies and enabling thinking.

Findings

DIY invention and production is able to create physical goods, which are both original and economical, through open, distributed, minimal processes. Within the existing paradigm, by contrast, physical goods are created, which are either original or economical, through processes that are less open, less distributed, and less minimal than the processes of new‐DIY.

Practical implications

DIY invention, production, and sale of physical goods deploys technologies that are used within the existing paradigm for creating physical goods. The difference in outcomes is due to the different conceptualization of invention, production, and sales within the established paradigm.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is that it provides an analysis of key aspects of DIY invention, production, and sales. The value of the paper is that it provides a starting point for researchers and practitioners seeking to determine how practices, technologies, and challenges of the existing paradigm can be related to DIY opportunities.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

John Roberts and Sarah Wenden

Do out of town superstores adversely affect traditional shopping centres by siphoning off the higher purchasing power of car‐owning households? The arguments for and…

Abstract

Do out of town superstores adversely affect traditional shopping centres by siphoning off the higher purchasing power of car‐owning households? The arguments for and against persist, but it appears that retail warehouses, selling bulky, durable goods in out of town locations are generally looked on favourably by planning authorities. As the trend to larger stores seems to have developed an unstoppable momentum, a recent project was set up to find out how accessible edge, or out of town, warehouses are, who uses them, and how they affect conventional shopping centres, particularly those with shops selling comparable merchandise. The following paper presents part of this research. It was carried out by Transport and Environment Studies (TEST), for London Transport in their dual role as public transport operators and as land owners with sites of interest to DIY superstore developers. The paper was presented at PTRC's 12th annual summer meeting in July this year, at the University of Sussex.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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