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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

David J. Bryde and Brian Slocock

Describes research into attitudinal differences between small‐sized and medium/large‐sized organisations towards the benefits/limitations of obtaining certification for a…

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1377

Abstract

Describes research into attitudinal differences between small‐sized and medium/large‐sized organisations towards the benefits/limitations of obtaining certification for a quality management system (QMS) and differences between small‐sized and medium/large‐sized organisations in terms of the pressures driving organisations to seek certification. Presents details of prototype model building of characteristics of organisations either positive or negative towards a certified QMS approach. Fifty organisations were surveyed using a postal questionnaire. Finds some evidence of smaller‐sized organisations having more negative attitudes to QMS certification than medium/large‐sized organisations. Finds both small‐sized and medium/large‐sized organisations attach importance to internal reasons (i.e. a desire to improve internal efficiency) and external reasons (i.e. pressure from customers) in influencing the decision to seek certification. Suggests small‐sized manufacturing companies currently in the process of seeking certification are more likely to fit the model profile of organisations hostile to the QMS certification approach.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Ida Gremyr, Jan Lenning, Mattias Elg and Jason Martin

Over one million organisations have a quality management system (QMS) certified to the ISO 9001 standard; however, the system requires a lot of resources and its value has…

Abstract

Purpose

Over one million organisations have a quality management system (QMS) certified to the ISO 9001 standard; however, the system requires a lot of resources and its value has been questioned. This critique also leads to a questioning of the strategic relevance of quality management. The purpose of this paper is to explore how different types of uses of QMS correlate with management perceptions of quality management in terms of respect, cost and strategic importance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a mixed method data collection strategy, quantitative data being collected from a survey in 8 organisations (n = 108) and qualitative data being collected from 12 interviews with quality managers in 12 different organisations.

Findings

The paper shows that a compliance-oriented QMS usage will more likely lead to a view of quality management as costly and of little respect, than a business or improvement-oriented QMS usage. Moreover, it nuances the view on compliance-oriented usage, showing that it is mainly documentation that negatively influences how management views quality management, whereas standardisation that is part of the compliance-oriented use is perceived as more value-adding.

Originality/value

This paper suggests three types of QMS use, namely, business management, improvement, and compliance-oriented use, and that a wise selection of how to use the QMS will affect the respect, strategic importance and cost that management associates with quality management.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Virupaxi Bagodi, Sreenath Thimmappa Venkatesh and Deepankar Sinha

The paper aims to identify causality amongst small and medium enterprises' (SMEs') performance indicators, propose an integrated index of business performance and quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify causality amongst small and medium enterprises' (SMEs') performance indicators, propose an integrated index of business performance and quality practices and investigate the effect of quality management system (QMS) on business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes a two-stage approach. In the first stage, the authors gathered responses with a questionnaire on variables affecting business performance and identified dimensions using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Path analysis was carried out to identify causality between the dimensions. In the next stage, the validation of stage 1 findings was carried out to substantiate the proposition that QMS affects performance. Questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews were conducted during the second stage. The analysis was done following the case study protocol – within- and cross-case analysis and validated with supportive and conflicting literature.

Findings

The results show that the employee – dimension is crucial to process effectiveness, customer satisfaction and finances. Customer satisfaction results from employee satisfaction and processes. QMS impacts processes and employee performance, thus establishes the causality between business performance factors and QMS. QMS impacts finances in the short run but yields long-term benefits and is dependent on two factors – degree of knowledge of quality practices and its application in business.

Originality/value

This study reveals the performance dimensions of SMEs, their causality and the impact of QMS on performance. It suggests a shift from traditional approaches, correcting defects using statistical quality control approaches, to a sustainable growth path – a long-term approach. This study puts forward two associated indices – the business performance and the knowledge of quality practices and its application index.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Neeraj Yadav, Ravi Shankar and Surya Prakash Singh

This paper compares impact of Industry 4.0 / emerging information and communication Technologies (ICTs), for example, Internet of things (IOT), machine learning…

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1074

Abstract

Purpose

This paper compares impact of Industry 4.0 / emerging information and communication Technologies (ICTs), for example, Internet of things (IOT), machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), robotics and cloud computing, on 22 organisational performance indicators under nine combinations of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) and quality management systems (QMS).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey of 105 Indian organisations was done about their experience of using QMS, Lean Six Sigma and emerging ICTs. Respondents included both manufacturing and service enterprises of different scales and sectors. The responses collected were compared, and statistically significant difference among them was evaluated using chi-square test.

Findings

The study confirmed statistically significant difference among 20 organisational performance indicators under different combinations of QMS, LSS and ICTs. These indicators include quality performance, delivery performance, sales turnover, inventory level and so forth. However, for two indicators, namely, absenteeism and throughput, significant difference in responses was not established.

Research limitations/implications

All possible combinations of QMS, LSS, only LSS tools and ICTs were not studied because of either theoretical impossibility (e.g. using LSS without LSS tools) or practically rare situations (e.g. organisations using ICTs and LSS without QMS). Furthermore, the impact from different sequences of implementing QMS, LSS and ICTs can be studied.

Practical implications

Using this study, practitioners can identify which LSS, Quality System and ICT combination results in best performance and quick success. On theoretical front, the study confirms impact of LSS and QMS on organisational performance.

Originality/value

This study evaluates organisational performance under several possible combinations of QMS, LSS, and emerging ICTs, which was so far unexplored.

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Debby Willar, Bambang Trigunarsyah and Vaughan Coffey

The review of literature found that there is a significant correlation between a construction company’s organisational culture and the company quality performance. The…

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3196

Abstract

Purpose

The review of literature found that there is a significant correlation between a construction company’s organisational culture and the company quality performance. The purpose of this paper is to assess the organisational culture profiles of Indonesian construction companies, and to examine the influence of the companies’ organisational culture profiles on their quality management systems (based on QMS-ISO 9001:2008) implementation. Prior to conducting the examination, there are examinations of the relationships among the quality management system (QMS) variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed a survey questionnaire of construction industry practitioners who have experience in building and civil engineering works. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument was selected due to its suitability in assessing organisation’s underlying culture.

Findings

Within the examination among the QMS variables, it was found that problematic issues associated with the implementation of QMS-ISO 9001:2008 in Indonesian construction companies can affect the implementation of the QMS and contribute to the lower level of companies’ business performance. It was also found that there is no significant relationship between the QMS implementation and the companies’ business performance. By using the Competing Values Framework diagram, it was found that most of the construction companies’ organisational culture is characterised by a Clan type which is reflected in how employees are managed, how the organisation is held together, and how the organisation’s success is defined; the leadership style is Hierarchy-focused, while the organisation’s strategy is Market type. It was also found that different culture profiles have different influences on the QMS implementation.

Originality/value

A strong mixed Hierarchy and Market culture needs to be developed within the construction companies in Indonesia, as the driver to support proper and successful implementation of their QMS in order to enhance business performance in a quality performance-oriented Indonesian construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Jorge Antonio Arribas Díaz and Catalina Martínez-Mediano

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of quality management systems (QMS) based on international standards of quality in education (ISO 9001:2008) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of quality management systems (QMS) based on international standards of quality in education (ISO 9001:2008) and ascertain the influence of this quality model on primary and secondary schools in Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in 26 publicly funded, private schools in Spain. The research design was a three-phase, mixed-methods evaluation. In all, 809 teachers answered the main survey questionnaire in Phase 3, which was validated through expert reviews and exploratory factor analysis against two theoretically derived dimensions of quality. The total scores of the two dimensions demonstrated Cronbach’s alpha reliability estimate > 0.95. A discriminant function analysis was applied next to compare three groups of schools based on teachers’ QMS ratings, using students’ achievement and other school quality indicators as predictors.

Findings

The QMS model was perceived to have contributed to improvements in documentation and management through evaluation, continuous improvement processes, the schools’ external image, management of resources and user satisfaction levels. Some of the improvements lasted over time. The schools rated as “high” by teachers on QMS implementation levels had better educational outcomes, as well as user perception and satisfaction levels, as compared to schools rated as “low”. Drawbacks of the QMS model were perceived as high bureaucratic workloads and a top–down management culture.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that ISO standards of QMS can be adopted in primary and secondary education institutions successfully, and that they are suitable for improving schools and educational systems overall.

Originality/value

The study’s originality lies in the demonstrated outcomes of the QMS approach, originally created for industrial environments, in a large Spanish primary and secondary education institution using a three-phase, mixed-methods design.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Pedro Marques, José Requeijo, Pedro Saraiva and Francisco Frazão‐Guerreiro

By exploiting the relationships between Six Sigma and quality management systems (QMS) based on the ISO 9001 standard, this paper proposes a set of guidelines to combine…

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2050

Abstract

Purpose

By exploiting the relationships between Six Sigma and quality management systems (QMS) based on the ISO 9001 standard, this paper proposes a set of guidelines to combine and integrate both approaches in a systematic way. The guidelines are organised into integration topics, and each one is linked to the clauses of the ISO 9001 standard they refer to.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review, Six Sigma and QMS based on the ISO 9001 standard are thoroughly discussed and compared and beneficial synergies between them are identified. Based on this study, and to take advantage of the compatibilities and logical linkages between both approaches, guidelines for the integration of Six Sigma with the ISO 9001 requirements are developed.

Findings

Benefits resulting from the integration of Six Sigma with a QMS based on the ISO 9001 standard are mutual. The integration guidelines proposed in this paper provide a framework to unify process management practices, enhance the effectiveness of continual improvement efforts, facilitate the identification, evaluation and selection of Six Sigma projects, align the quality objectives defined for the QMS with Six Sigma project goals, establish relationships between the roles of a Six Sigma program and those inherent to an ISO 9001 QMS, and demonstrate how internal quality audits and management review benefit from a Six Sigma program.

Research limitations/implications

The integration models and guidelines herein proposed can be further expanded to include other relevant normative references, particularly environmental management systems (ISO 14001) and safety and health management systems (OHSAS 18001).

Originality/value

The set of guidelines proposed in this paper is original and will be of practical value to the increasing number of organisations adopting a process‐model for the ISO 9001 standard, that seek to incorporate Six Sigma principles, practices, methods and tools within their QMS. The guidelines cover a wide spectrum of relevant activities that usually take place in the context of both initiatives. In addition, because each guideline is accompanied by the identification of the applicable clauses of ISO 9001, they provide a useful framework to develop, implement, maintain, and improve a QMS in parallel with a Six Sigma program.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Bozena Poksinska, Jörgen A.E. Eklund and Jens Jörn Dahlgaard

The aim of the study is to investigate and to understand the practice of implementing and operating the QMS in an organisational context, providing an analysis of the way…

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5864

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to investigate and to understand the practice of implementing and operating the QMS in an organisational context, providing an analysis of the way ISO 9001:2000 was implemented and operated and focusing on identifying factors which have negatively or positively influenced the effects of the quality management system (QMS).

Design/methodology/approach

Three case studies of small organisations were examined. The methodological approach was based on Porras and Robertson's model. The data collection methods included interviews, a questionnaire survey of all employees and document studies.

Findings

ISO 9001:2000 was implemented and operated with minimum effort and little change was experienced. QMS was not perceived as a tool for managing processes, but as a tool for handling documentation. Consequently, this was reflected in the benefits achieved. Despite the external benefits which followed from obtaining the certificates, only minor internal benefits were found. Internal motivation, engaged and trained employees, a competent quality manager, committed CEO and development‐oriented auditors were identified as critical, influencing the effects from ISO 9000. In general, in the way ISO 9001:2000 was implemented and operated many opportunities for improvement were lost.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of small organisations for the case studies has important implications for the results. Small organisations often lack resources, which limits the initiatives that they can take.

Practical implications

The QMS and its effects are not determined by the ISO 9001 requirements, but by the organisational context and the way the system is implemented and operated.

Originality/value

The paper provides an explanation why organisations achieve very different results from ISO 9001 implementation. It also shows that certification bodies may have an important role for the effectiveness of the QMS.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Vrassidas Leopoulos and Georgios Chatzistelios

This paper aims to propose a method for the development of quality management systems (QMS) that allows the consultant that undertakes the support of the organisation to…

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1029

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a method for the development of quality management systems (QMS) that allows the consultant that undertakes the support of the organisation to take advantage of a corporate memory. The consultant develops a new QMS based on a preliminary draft that is created using suitable reference processes from a library, selected according to the features of the organisation's production system.

Design/methodology/approach

The method adopts a taxonomy of production systems, based on a set of features (e.g. degree of the products’ customisation, form of purchasing, etc.) and creates a library of reference processes that satisfy the requirements of the standard and are suitable for each particular type of production system.

Findings

The QMS developed according to the proposed method satisfy both the requirements of the standard ISO 9001 and the needs of the organisation in which the QMS is installed in the biggest possible degree. The duration and cost of the project for the new QMS is reduced and the effort is oriented towards the process adaptation and improvement.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed approach is general and can be applied to several types of industries. However, the proposed taxonomy is applicable to manufacturing companies. For other types of organisations specific taxonomies should be developed.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper stems from the development of a QMS based on reference processes rather than the modelling and reviewing of as-is processes.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Younès El Manzani, Mohamed Larbi Sidmou and Jean-jack Cegarra

Building on the sociotechnical systems theory (STS), the purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct impacts of the social and technical QMs (ISO 9001) practices on…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the sociotechnical systems theory (STS), the purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct impacts of the social and technical QMs (ISO 9001) practices on both incremental and radical product innovation and the direct relationships relaying QMs (ISO 9001) as a sociotechnical system with incremental and radical product innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for a survey instrument to collect quantitative data from 82 Moroccan certified ISO 9001 firm. A partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results show that the social and technical QMs (ISO 9001) practices do not have a significant relationship with incremental and radical product innovation when they are taken in isolation. However, when ranged together to constitute a whole sociotechnical system of QMs (ISO 9001), QMs (ISO 9001) prove to have a strong positive and significant impact on incremental product innovation and a weak positive and significant impact on radical product innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the small sample size that might weaken the significance of the results and the use of cross-sectional data, this research may lack a large statistical generalizability vis-à-vis the analytical generalization.

Practical implications

The results provide useful implications for managers, suggesting that in order to develop their product innovation, they must ensure that both QMs (ISO 9001) social and technical practices achieve a high level of integration without allowing some quality practices to take over.

Originality/value

Based on the STS, this study is the first to focus primarily on the role of the multi-dimensional structure of QMs (ISO 9001), i.e. social and technical practices, in incremental and radical product innovation.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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