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Expert briefing
Publication date: 20 August 2021

In June, Morocco accused Algeria of illicitly facilitating the transfer of Western Saharan independence leader Brahim Ghali to Spain for medical treatment. In July, an…

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB263612

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Lauren Wagner and Claudio Minca

Marrakech is today the most important tourist destination in Morocco. Marrakech, however, is not only a key reference point for mass international tourism, but also the…

Abstract

Marrakech is today the most important tourist destination in Morocco. Marrakech, however, is not only a key reference point for mass international tourism, but also the preferred choice for those hunting for an “authentic” experience in this North African country. The “Red City” is indeed often presented in literature and advertising alike as a place out of modern time where the real “soul” of Morocco can be found and unveiled (Minca, 2006). This chapter investigates how this “soul” was established—and is now, in Marrakech, constantly reenacted—through layers of colonial and postcolonial interactions between Europe and Morocco.

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Culture and Society in Tourism Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-683-7

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Cynthia Magallanes-Gonzalez

Scholars have found that transnational migrant women fulfill their role of mothers despite geographical distances. Researchers, however, focus on women in their country of…

Abstract

Scholars have found that transnational migrant women fulfill their role of mothers despite geographical distances. Researchers, however, focus on women in their country of destination, and thus have neglected to look at the experiences of women who get “stuck” in transit countries during their migration journeys. This chapter fills that gap in the literature by examining the experiences of Sub-Saharan African women in Morocco en route to Europe. Interviews with 20 Sub-Saharan African women show that unlike transnational mothers in their country of destination, which are mostly more affluent nations, these women neither have the financial means to provide for their children nor can maintain their relationships with them via telecommunication. Although the women acknowledge that they cannot fulfill their role of mothers in Morocco, they maintain a sense of themselves as mothers by emphasizing that they will financially provide for their children once they reach Europe.

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Marginalized Mothers, Mothering from the Margins
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-400-8

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Mohammed Ahmad Naheem

Morocco is an expanding developing economy in North Africa with increasing bilateral trade relations with larger economies. This paper aims to examine the features of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Morocco is an expanding developing economy in North Africa with increasing bilateral trade relations with larger economies. This paper aims to examine the features of the expanding market economy and the preceding structural reforms initiated by King Mohammed VI. The paper’s primary focus is to study the systematic feature of anti-money laundering and combatting of terrorist financing (AML/CTF). Morocco has emerged as a staunch opponent of terrorism and terrorist financing while garnering joint-investigative operations with European countries against transnational organised crime and money laundering.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is divided into two primary series. The first is a view of Morocco’s economy, with a qualitative analysis of significant economic, political and social structural reforms. Second, a qualitative and quantitative analysis of Morocco’s AML and combating of terrorist financing infrastructure is assessed. The qualitative analysis is conducted in two parts; first, by studying the country’s AML/CTF legislation and regulation, and second, by examining the independent international evaluation of the legal structure and its implementation by authorities. The quantitative analysis is conducted by investigating the available statistics relating to money laundering and terrorist financing.

Findings

The paper finds Morocco to have accomplished essential economic reforms, especially considering greater institutional management and autonomy. Other structural reforms include the reformation of the constitution, a more comfortable business climate, social development projects focusing on enhancing skill labour and connectivity and the development of strong trade capacity. The primary objective discovery concerns the country’s AML/CTF structure, which is found to comply with international standards. Also, efforts enhancing the country’s regulatory environment with low corruption, low risk of money laundering and low risk of terrorist financing have been taken in a series of legislative amendments and programs. The banking sector and Morocco’s Customs agency have reflected the best improvement as per the study in this paper.

Practical implications

Morocco is witnessing high levels of investment, with year-on-year growth in most existing industrial sectors. The market is also providing for new skilled labour and better trade incentives with the European Union. It is essential for investors, observers and policymakers to understand the market economy reforms and systematic deficiencies in a developing economy. Morocco presents observers with information about policies pre-reform, providing a guide for economic and AML/CTF policy implementation elsewhere.

Originality/value

The paper concerns itself with two levels of analysis concerning Morocco. The first, broad study, is a review of market economy reforms, which are mostly structural and have assisted in the expansion of the economy greatly. The second objective is specific to examining the country’s AML/CTF structure, which has undergone significant development in legislation, regulation and implementation in the past decade. The paper makes a specific attempt to discuss associate indicators to the AML/CTF network as a part of this study.

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Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Chantal McPhee and Annette St‐Onge

The United Nations General Assembly adopted 2005 as the Year of Microcredit, recognizing the link between inclusive financial systems and the economic development of those…

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Abstract

Purpose

The United Nations General Assembly adopted 2005 as the Year of Microcredit, recognizing the link between inclusive financial systems and the economic development of those most at need. Microcredit, or more broadly microfinance (MF) has a role to play in facilitating growth through the provision of credit to entrepreneurs. Association Al Amana for the Promotion of Micro‐Enterprises Morocco (Al Amana) is an unusually successful microfinance institution (MFI) registered as a non‐profit organization in Morocco. Starting in 1997, with capital provided by USAID, it has grown to become the leading MFI within Morocco and the broader Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. It has seen rapid growth in clients and assets while also reaching a level of financial sustainability uncommon among MFIs. Why has Al Amana been so successful? This paper will seek to examine this question, highlighting key internal and external factors that have contributed to this organization's success.

Design/methodology/approach

Further, this analysis will examine Al Amana within its regional enabling environment to highlight those critical issues within an entrepreneurial finance climate that are conducive to MF lending. Additional analysis of Al Amana includes a review of their portfolio, key financial indicators, and other bank strategies that have been instrumental in their financial growth and success. Lastly, the analysis will conclude with a discussion of the key factors that will become important to the sustainability and growth of this MFI as it serves the needs of entrepreneurs in Morocco. The methodology for the research consisted of a literature review of MFI activity in Morocco and the MENA region, an examination of key elements within the enabling environment, and a financial review of Al Amana and its key financial results.

Findings

The results of the research provide a case study of a successful MFI that is contributing to the development of entrepreneurs in its region. It will also highlight the specific organizational factors as well as key elements in the enabling environment that have facilitated the success of Al Amana.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the success of Al Amana in Morocco and presents some of the challenges facing the organization.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Yossef Ben‐Meir

The purpose of this paper is to explain the Moroccan Roadmap to regionalize the country (with the Western Sahara) that is currently presented in principle or general…

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1480

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the Moroccan Roadmap to regionalize the country (with the Western Sahara) that is currently presented in principle or general guidelines. By providing greater operational definition to the Roadmap and specific recommendations (including budgetary) for its implementation, the Moroccan and international public and policy makers will see the challenges and merits of the plan, including the potential to significantly advance human development and resolve the Western Saharan conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

There are three methods applied in the research of this paper. First, public statements made by King Mohammed VI of Morocco related to regionalization and all aspects of development (community, gender (though not addressed here), human, participatory, reconciliation, and sustainable) were organized chronologically and categorized. This put in place the principle tenets of Morocco's Roadmap. Second, the basic constructed Roadmap is then evaluated against the literature in the field of decentralization and development. This provides a sense of direction the Roadmap intends for transferring power to the sub‐national level and promoting local development. Finally, recommendations for the Roadmap's implementation are presented that reflect the literature and the author's 18 years experience in development in Morocco.

Findings

Morocco's Roadmap is relatively innovative as compared against other international decentralization models because it incorporates three of the four major approaches applied in cases around the world to transfer power from the national to sub‐national tiers, and does so in a way that intends to marshal local to national resources toward supporting community‐driven initiatives. This presents considerable opportunities to improve socio‐economic and environmental conditions, and reform vital institutions.

Research limitations/implications

Morocco's Roadmap is broadly stated, and the Advisory Committee on Regionalization appointed by the King is due to have its recommendations for implementation ready to present by 2011. Thus, there is an element of projection in the research by way of building a more clearly defined Roadmap (in order to make it operational) through a literature analysis of its basic‐stated precepts.

Social implications

The leaders and people of the region and the international community feel a new sense of urgency to resolve the Western Saharan conflict because of the disunity it creates in North Africa, and therefore insecurity and volatility at a crossroads of its hemisphere in a globally insecure time. The international community also seems generally receptive to Morocco's regionalization proposal, which now extends to the whole of the Kingdom a transferring of power from the capital to the regions. The essay provides a clear rationale and description of the proposal/plan, and specificity as to how it can be implemented. It will likely be well received by policy‐makers internationally and those charged in Morocco with implementing the plan.

Originality/value

Just in this past year, there has been a real increase in scholarly, governmental, civil, and public attention on Moroccan regionalization, but it generally remains abstract and unclear as to what it is and involves. This essay provides more vivid detail by thoroughness of research of Moroccan and international sources and the author's extensive experience in working with Moroccan administrations in regards to development, project management, and applying the participatory method (the approach Morocco's King repeatedly stated is intended to drive Moroccan regionalization).

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 8 December 2016

The Trump administration's effect on Morocco.

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB216549

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Moroccan outreach in Africa

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 12 January 2017

Moroccan foreign policy.

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Heather Lea Moulaison

This paper aims to explore the information technology environment in a developing country, Morocco, through a discussion of the people, their information environment, and…

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1389

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the information technology environment in a developing country, Morocco, through a discussion of the people, their information environment, and libraries. Concepts of modern library and information studies (LIS) education and the new role of the library professional in this context are also to be explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Largely based on a review of literature on the people, their information environment, and technology in Morocco, this paper incorporates both synthesis and discussion from an LIS point‐of‐view.

Findings

Basic elements of the culture make library work difficult in Morocco. In reflecting on other cultures and participating in the international LIS dialogue, librarians can develop new perspectives on difficulties they experience at their home institutions while contributing to solutions of problems abroad.

Practical implications

By supporting library work in developing countries, western librarians can have a positive impact on users both at home and abroad.

Originality/value

Third world librarianship is not a phenomenon happening “over there” in a vacuum – real librarians trained in library and information science in countries like Morocco are helping users to access information. Their work contributes to the international conversation taking place in LIS, a discussion that is ultimately of benefit to all involved.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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