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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Dennis N. Ocholla

Discusses issues relating to professional development and manpowertraining in Kenya. Provides background information on the libraries andinformation sciences training

Abstract

Discusses issues relating to professional development and manpower training in Kenya. Provides background information on the libraries and information sciences training programmes situation. Gives attention to issues and trends affecting the information profession in training, curricula development, application of information technology, cost of information materials and the crisis in supply and demand in regard to manpower development in the information profession. Suggests that institutions for training information professionals need to observe the supply and demand trends in their environment and to adjust both the curricula and intake of trainees to the national situation. The training institutions also need to broaden the courses offered in their programmes to include computer skills, communication studies, economics of information, marketing, research methodologies, management, publishing and booktrade, resource sharing and continuing education. The market for information professionals needs to be provided with products with diversified knowledge and skills. Concludes with observations on how the problems of manpower development and training in information sciences in Kenya may be handled.

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Karen Anderson

This paper aims to explore the definitions of and the differences between education and training and the role of each in nurturing and supporting lifelong learning for

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the definitions of and the differences between education and training and the role of each in nurturing and supporting lifelong learning for records professionals: records managers and archivists.

Design/methodology/approach

General definitions of “education”, “training”, “competence” and “competencies” have been deliberately selected as an accessible starting‐point for reflection. Different models for competencies and the lack of consensus on what constitutes an appropriate competency model for the profession are considered.

Findings

Education provides new professionals with knowledge of theory of the discipline and helps them to explore current practice. It provides the information‐seeking skills and encourages a reflective habit that underpins independent lifelong learning. Training focuses on acquisition of specific skills and competencies necessary in the workplace. More is needed for a viable professional future; education for research is essential to the development of professional knowledge and for the survival of education programmes in universities.

Practical implications

Professional associations as leaders of opinion and practice have an important role in finding the way forward. Although competency standards are more appropriate for evaluating training programmes, professional associations which have embraced competency standards have attempted to use them to evaluate education programmes, but prefer not to consider evaluating training programmes and training providers.

Originality/value

This paper aims to raise awareness of the need to give appropriate weight to education, training and research to ensure that records professionals are known for high levels of competence as well as productive reflection and creative forward thinking.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Eric Frank

An attempt is made to illustrate the multi‐faceted and multifarious nature of human resource development worldwide, following a definition of it and a description of how…

Abstract

An attempt is made to illustrate the multi‐faceted and multifarious nature of human resource development worldwide, following a definition of it and a description of how it operates in a number of countries throughout the world, including the US, the EEC countries, India, Singapore, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. The roles and functions of HRD practitioners are examined, and the competences required listed. A short history of the International Federation of Training and Development Organisations is offered and a list of conferences described.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Zhong‐Ming Wang

With the rapid development of economic reform and organizational change, management education and development has become an increasingly important topic among Chinese…

Abstract

With the rapid development of economic reform and organizational change, management education and development has become an increasingly important topic among Chinese universities, governmental departments as well as industrial organizations. The transformation of the Chinese state‐owned management systems into a market‐oriented shareholding system, the nationwide organizational reform and downsizing movement among state enterprises, the development of international joint ventures and wholly‐owned companies, and the increasingly urgent needs for professional training call for innovative approaches to management education in China. This article presents some current models of management education and innovative strategies for facilitating training and development in Chinese enterprises.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

A.B. Odro, L.K. Dadzie, P. Ryan, D. Collins and R. Lodoiska

This paper is about a single case study of a three-year BSc Mental Health Nursing degree programme based at a London University. The purpose of the paper is to evaluate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is about a single case study of a three-year BSc Mental Health Nursing degree programme based at a London University. The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the extent to which the programme sufficiently addresses the ten quality criteria developed by the “PROMISE” (2009) Mental Health Promotion Project. PROMISE (2009) is a European public health project funded by the European Commission and was conducted from 2009 to 2012. Its aim was the European-wide development of criteria and training guidelines in mental health promotion and recommended these should be integrated into the professional training curricula of nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis method (Bryman, 2012) was used for this case study. This method allowed for a line-by-line scrutiny of the contents of the curriculum for evidence of the ten PROMISE quality criteria for mental health promotion (PROMISE project; http://promise-mental-health.com/training-guidelines.html).

Findings

The findings revealed that the PROMISE (2009) project was not one of the four key documents stated as forming the basis for the design of the curriculum content. However, the study found evidence of the curriculum addressing the first PROMISE criterion of embracing the principles of mental health promotion in seven of the 14 modules (50 per cent) in the programme. In the first year of the programme five of the ten PROMISE quality criteria were embedded in two of the four modules. In year 2, quality criteria 1, 4 and 7 were addressed in the course content of four of the five modules (see Table I). In the final year of the programme PROMISE quality criteria 1, 2, 4 and 8 were embedded in the syllabus and assessment strategy in two out of the five final year modules. It was also found that quality criteria 2 and 9 were not included in any of the modules in the programme.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study based on the content analysis of a single curriculum document in a London University. It is therefore not possible to make wide generalisation of its findings across the countries involved in the EU Promise project. However, it could be argued that it is possible to find a number of the key findings present in other UK University programmes that may be similar in structure to that selected for this study. The other limitation to this content analysis is that the evaluation process did not include accounts of the students’ experience on the programme. This could have contributed significantly to the outcome of the evaluation exercise. Although the methodology used is simple, practical and relatively sound, it is not necessarily rigorous in terms of quantitative research methodology but arguably an acceptable contribution to the spectrum within qualitative research paradigm.

Practical implications

The emergence of the “PROMISE” criteria especially on a European-wide basis puts emphasis on the importance of mental health promotion in the training of health care professionals. This is expected to be achieved by the training institutions in the European Union. In the UK, this notion is well embraced in various health policy documents (e.g. “No Health Without Mental Health” DH 2011). In the case of the programme examined at one London University, work is required to ensure that a pervasive incorporation of mental health promotion strategies in the curriculum in order to help the students to become better equipped to understand and effectively apply the mental health promotion criteria in their work upon qualification.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to address the “PROMISE” project and the issue of incorporating mental health promotion criteria in a pre-registration mental health pathway training programme in a university in the UK.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

C.L. Sapra

Discusses the tasks facing educational management in Indiaresulting from demographic change, social demand for education andeconomic need for trained manpower. Attempts to…

Abstract

Discusses the tasks facing educational management in India resulting from demographic change, social demand for education and economic need for trained manpower. Attempts to develop a social paradigm for the year 2000 and beyond that reflects concerns about the strength of India′s democracy and secularization, as well as more immediate practical challenges.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Jennifer Anne Fraser, Tara Flemington, Diep Thi Ngoc Doan, Van Minh Tu Hoang, Binh Thi Le Doan and Tuan Manh Ha

The purpose of this paper is to validate measures of professional self-efficacy for detecting and responding to child abuse and neglect presentations, and then evaluate a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate measures of professional self-efficacy for detecting and responding to child abuse and neglect presentations, and then evaluate a clinical training programme for health professionals in a tertiary-level hospital in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

A prospective, cohort design was used and professional self-efficacy was measured immediately prior to, and shortly after, training 116 nurses and doctors in emergency settings. Longer-term follow-up was measured six months later.

Findings

Linear mixed modelling showed that there was a statistically significant improvement in efficacy expectations for both suspected and known cases of child abuse and neglect between the pre- and post-test measures at zero and six weeks. These improvements did not persist to the six-month follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

The training succeeded in improving detection and clinical response to child abuse and neglect presentations but not faith in the provision of ongoing support for children and families.

Practical implications

Practice change in emergency settings in Vietnam can be achieved using a sustainable theoretically driven training programme.

Social implications

Building the capacity of health professionals to respond to cases of child abuse and neglect relies on the strength of the community and support services within which the hospital is located.

Originality/value

Measures of self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectations for responding to child abuse and neglect presentations in emergency settings in Vietnam are now validated.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Penny Garrod

This paper outlines the methods and findings of an Electronic Libraries (eLib) Programme research project: SKIP (Skills for new Information Professionals). The project set…

Abstract

This paper outlines the methods and findings of an Electronic Libraries (eLib) Programme research project: SKIP (Skills for new Information Professionals). The project set out to evaluate the impact of information technology on the skills and roles of staff working in library and information services. The findings indicate that the personal qualities of staff are the key to their success in the networked environment, and that professional and service cultures can inhibit an individual’s professional development and effectiveness in the work place. Information Technology (IT) skills are important, but these can be acquired by those with the desired personal qualities, and who are provided with a working environment which is conducive to personal and professional development.

Details

Program, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2015

Denise J. Uitto and Ritu V. Chopra

Training, particularly in the form of comprehensive professional development, continues to be a need for paraeducators (also known as teacher assistants). Training needs…

Abstract

Training, particularly in the form of comprehensive professional development, continues to be a need for paraeducators (also known as teacher assistants). Training needs begin with an initial set of knowledge and skills and is built based upon the paraeducator’s role with individual students and the educational settings. Standards or guidance documents are available from a few individual states within the United States, higher education systems, and professional organizations that serve individuals with exceptional needs and agencies. An international professional organization, Council for Exceptional Children [CEC] (2011), identified a common skill set that reinforces standards for defining curricula when providing training to paraeducators. Key to their ongoing professional development is the on-the-job coaching by the education professional (teacher), to support the application of skills into the inclusive setting. Various forms of professional development are available including online trainings in addition to face-to-face.

Details

Working with Teaching Assistants and Other Support Staff for Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-611-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

M.J. Balogun

The factors which produced an excess of centralisation in Africa are described. The training needs arising from the new emphasis on decentralisation are then outlined. An…

Abstract

The factors which produced an excess of centralisation in Africa are described. The training needs arising from the new emphasis on decentralisation are then outlined. An assessment is made of current training efforts and a programme for future action offered.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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