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Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2015

Denise J. Uitto and Ritu V. Chopra

Training, particularly in the form of comprehensive professional development, continues to be a need for paraeducators (also known as teacher assistants). Training needs…

Abstract

Training, particularly in the form of comprehensive professional development, continues to be a need for paraeducators (also known as teacher assistants). Training needs begin with an initial set of knowledge and skills and is built based upon the paraeducator’s role with individual students and the educational settings. Standards or guidance documents are available from a few individual states within the United States, higher education systems, and professional organizations that serve individuals with exceptional needs and agencies. An international professional organization, Council for Exceptional Children [CEC] (2011), identified a common skill set that reinforces standards for defining curricula when providing training to paraeducators. Key to their ongoing professional development is the on-the-job coaching by the education professional (teacher), to support the application of skills into the inclusive setting. Various forms of professional development are available including online trainings in addition to face-to-face.

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Working with Teaching Assistants and Other Support Staff for Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-611-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

David Baker

Library assistants were originally considered to be professional librarians in the making, and were trained accordingly. With the expansion of libraries and librarianship…

Abstract

Library assistants were originally considered to be professional librarians in the making, and were trained accordingly. With the expansion of libraries and librarianship, Britain's “apprenticeship” system of qualification gave way to formal library school education, and a new category of “non‐professional staff” was created, of people who were unwilling or unable to proceed to graduate‐level qualification. The development of non‐professional certificates of competence in the UK is described against parallel developments in the US, Canada and Australia; the COMLA training modules are also examined. The theoretical and practical issues surrounding training are discussed, training schemes and qualifications in the four countries analysed, and the relative merits of in‐house training and external certificate programmes argued.

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Library Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Joan Williamson

The problems of One‐Man‐Bands (OMBs) began to be taken seriously in the early 1980s when the Aslib OMB group was formed. The group received considerable attention in the…

Abstract

The problems of One‐Man‐Bands (OMBs) began to be taken seriously in the early 1980s when the Aslib OMB group was formed. The group received considerable attention in the professional press, and became the object of a study by Judith Collins and Janet Shuter who identified them as “information professionals working in isolation”. Many of the problems identified in the Collins/Shuter study remain — not least of these being the further education and training needs of OMBs. These needs are studied in this report. The author has firstly done an extensive survey of the literature to find what has been written about this branch of the profession. Then by means of a questionnaire sent to the Aslib OMB group and the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (INVOG), training and education needs have been pinpointed. Some of these needs have then been explored in greater detail by means of case studies. The author found that the most common deterrents to continuing education and training were time, cost, location, finding suitable courses to cover the large variety of skills needed and lastly, lack of encouragement from employers. The author has concluded by recommending areas where further research is needed, and suggesting some solutions to the problems discussed.

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Library Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Karen Anderson

This paper aims to explore the definitions of and the differences between education and training and the role of each in nurturing and supporting lifelong learning for

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the definitions of and the differences between education and training and the role of each in nurturing and supporting lifelong learning for records professionals: records managers and archivists.

Design/methodology/approach

General definitions of “education”, “training”, “competence” and “competencies” have been deliberately selected as an accessible starting‐point for reflection. Different models for competencies and the lack of consensus on what constitutes an appropriate competency model for the profession are considered.

Findings

Education provides new professionals with knowledge of theory of the discipline and helps them to explore current practice. It provides the information‐seeking skills and encourages a reflective habit that underpins independent lifelong learning. Training focuses on acquisition of specific skills and competencies necessary in the workplace. More is needed for a viable professional future; education for research is essential to the development of professional knowledge and for the survival of education programmes in universities.

Practical implications

Professional associations as leaders of opinion and practice have an important role in finding the way forward. Although competency standards are more appropriate for evaluating training programmes, professional associations which have embraced competency standards have attempted to use them to evaluate education programmes, but prefer not to consider evaluating training programmes and training providers.

Originality/value

This paper aims to raise awareness of the need to give appropriate weight to education, training and research to ensure that records professionals are known for high levels of competence as well as productive reflection and creative forward thinking.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

G.J. Bergenhenegouwen

Training implies certain dealings in which one has to make a choice among various options. Choosing to solve a certain problem implies formulating a value judgement about…

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2664

Abstract

Training implies certain dealings in which one has to make a choice among various options. Choosing to solve a certain problem implies formulating a value judgement about the available alternatives. Such choices are generally based on ethical decisions. Hardly any ethical professional code for industrial trainers has been explicitly formulated until now. Investigates the issue of professional code and standards in this profession compared to other professions. At the same time describes a working method that benefits the process of realization necessary in dealing with the ethical issue in training.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Marta Gonçalves, Sérgio Caramelo and José Almeida Ribeiro

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the Institute of Public and Social Policies could be useful for Portuguese society in terms of post-graduate training in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the Institute of Public and Social Policies could be useful for Portuguese society in terms of post-graduate training in the area of aging.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have conducted two focus groups (n=11), one with professionals of one large and three medium size social organizations, and the other with managers of three large, two medium and two small size social, health and civil rights organizations which support the elderly population. While the specific aim of the first focus group was to identify the aging training needs of professionals, who work with assistance/support to the elderly population, the aim of the second group was to identify the training interests of the retired or pre-retired elderly population.

Findings

The results show on the one hand professional’s main challenges in working with elderly population in Portugal, their training needs and what exactly could be an adequate training for them in the area of aging as compared to the existing ones, and on the other hand who are the strongly committed elderly people, what are their training needs and what could exactly be for them an adequate training in the area of aging as compared to the existing ones.

Research limitations/implications

The authors can conclude that both social professionals and senior population in Portugal have a need for a post-graduate training in the area of aging.

Practical implications

Only by humanization at multilevel and a specific training for professionals and for families will we be able to deliver the opportunities and support that the citizens will need to enable them to age well across the life course.

Social implications

Given the rapidly changing and complex demography of Portugal it is essential to give attention to training in rethinking the support of the elderly population in Portugal.

Originality/value

The authors need to develop empowerment and social inclusion of the elderly population in the society.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Elijah Oluwatosin Oyewole and Joshua Oluwasuji Dada

The opportunities that the building information modeling (BIM) mode of project delivery presents warrant the need for the construction professionals to be adequately…

Abstract

Purpose

The opportunities that the building information modeling (BIM) mode of project delivery presents warrant the need for the construction professionals to be adequately trained on BIM technology and processes. The purpose of this paper is to assess the training gaps that exist between the perceived and expected knowledge of BIM practice among construction professionals in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out through a structured questionnaire survey administered on identifying training gaps among registered Nigerian construction professionals toward BIM adoption. Relevant information on the perceived and expected BIM mode of practices was systematically collected from 212 participants who are familiar with BIM concepts. The data generated were analyzed using descriptive statistics and gap analysis.

Findings

Gap analysis was employed in determining the significance of BIM training gap for various practices among the construction professionals. The most significant gaps in BIM practice with gap analysis value>1 are the project review technique and clash detection for architectural practice. Among quantity surveyors, cost estimating, preparation of bills of quantities and project budgeting are the practice areas where there are significant training gaps in adopting BIM. For engineering practices, the gap analysis reveals a significant training gap in design creation and coordination, as-built-modeling, clash detection and space management.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the perception of the respondents on actual and ideal BIM practices, not considering the process workflow, facility requirements and other issues that revolve round BIM adoption and implementation. It is also limited to professionals in the industry, and further studies will be appropriate to address these limitations.

Practical implications

The study reveals that there is a great need to meet the training gaps for BIM adoption in ensuring efficiency of construction project delivery.

Originality/value

The gaps that exist between the actual and expected BIM training were statistically established.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Samantha Wallis, Steven Bloch and Michael Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to document augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) training provision by clinical services in England.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) training provision by clinical services in England.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to obtain the following information concerning AAC training provision; frequency, length, type, content and cost, trainee occupations and numbers, and future training priorities, and information concerning training providers – service type, geographical area.

Findings

In total, 98 clinical service training providers in England responded. Services commonly reported providing AAC training to speech and language therapists, teaching assistants and teachers. Training around “use of specific AAC products, systems and technology” and “introducing/awareness raising of AAC products” were rated as high priority for future training and were two of the three subject areas where services reported the highest percentage of training. Training was predominantly provided at a foundation (basic) level.

Originality/value

There is no consensus on the amount or content of AAC training which professionals in England must receive. Evidence suggests that AAC training for pre-qualification professionals is limited and this paper has identified variation in the amount and type of post-qualification AAC training. While knowledge concerning specific AAC systems is necessary, focussing training primarily on this area may not address critical gaps in knowledge. There is a need for specific recommendations regarding AAC training for professionals in this field, to ensure professionals can fully support people who use AAC.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Jennifer C. Sarrett

The purpose of this paper is to assess the training forensic mental health professionals in the USA receive on intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Given…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the training forensic mental health professionals in the USA receive on intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Given the difficulties obtaining accurate prevalence rates of these disabilities in criminal justice settings, it is important to understand how these disabilities are being evaluated and the level of understanding about these disabilities evaluators hold.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was distributed to forensic mental health professionals in the USA that included questions on training opportunities in graduate education, post-graduate forensic training, and professional training opportunities. Participants were also asked about their current work, how they assess I/DD, and their estimates on the percentage of cases they see with I/DD.

Findings

Respondents reported some training that focused heavily on assessment methods. Most respondents estimated between 5 and 25 percent of their cases involving I/DD and reported using a wide range of assessment methods. Finally, many respondents reporting more training needed in this area.

Practical implications

More training is needed for forensic mental health professionals on identifying I/DD. Additionally, professional guidelines on what tools and methods to rely on to identify these disabilities is paramount to ensure homogeneity of methods and, thus, better estimates of overall prevalence in criminal justice settings.

Originality/value

This is the first assessment focused on how forensic mental health professionals are trained to identify I/DD and can be used to improve identification of I/DD in forensic settings.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Debbi A. Smith and Victor T. Oliva

This article aims to explore the attitudes of academic reference librarians toward generalist and subject specialist reference service, and to present an examination of…

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2577

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the attitudes of academic reference librarians toward generalist and subject specialist reference service, and to present an examination of the ways that these librarians obtain training to handle a range of research queries that fall outside their areas of expertise.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was conducted to explore the current best practices for ongoing professional training. A follow up survey was conducted among reference librarians to gain insights into their attitudes toward generalist and subject specialist reference activities, and their participation in, and attitudes toward, related professional education and training.

Findings

The results suggest that the reference librarians who responded have a high comfort level for answering queries in a range of subject areas, and that while some librarians may defer to a readily available subject expert this is not a reflection of their confidence in their own ability to have assisted the patron.

Practical implications

Based on the insights garnered from this survey, the authors did an additional review of the literature and incorporated the additional research for their conclusions and recommendations as to how reference librarians, regardless of whether they regard themselves as generalists or specialists, can best expand their knowledge of reference sources in additional fields and answer queries outside their areas of expertise.

Originality/value

Other libraries and reference librarians can use the results of the paper to develop their own training/professional development programs and activities.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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