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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Dennis N. Ocholla

Discusses issues relating to professional development and manpowertraining in Kenya. Provides background information on the libraries andinformation sciences training…

Abstract

Discusses issues relating to professional development and manpower training in Kenya. Provides background information on the libraries and information sciences training programmes situation. Gives attention to issues and trends affecting the information profession in training, curricula development, application of information technology, cost of information materials and the crisis in supply and demand in regard to manpower development in the information profession. Suggests that institutions for training information professionals need to observe the supply and demand trends in their environment and to adjust both the curricula and intake of trainees to the national situation. The training institutions also need to broaden the courses offered in their programmes to include computer skills, communication studies, economics of information, marketing, research methodologies, management, publishing and booktrade, resource sharing and continuing education. The market for information professionals needs to be provided with products with diversified knowledge and skills. Concludes with observations on how the problems of manpower development and training in information sciences in Kenya may be handled.

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Naomi Wangari Mwai, Joseph Kiplang’at and David Gichoya

The aim of this paper is to establish how resource dependency theory (RDT) and transaction cost theory (TCT) can inform decisions to outsource ICT services by public

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to establish how resource dependency theory (RDT) and transaction cost theory (TCT) can inform decisions to outsource ICT services by public university libraries in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a multiple case study strategy in four selected public universities libraries in Kenya. Purposive sampling was used to identify respondents and data collection was done using a semi-structured interview schedule.

Findings

The study highlights how RDT and TCT theoretical perspectives illuminate some of the reasons, and problems associated with Information and Communications Technology outsourcing in Libraries. The paper concludes with recommendations and the way forward.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to the outsourcing of information technology services in four public university libraries in Kenya, namely, Kenyatta University (KU) in Kahawa, Nairobi; Moi University (MU) in Eldoret; University of Nairobi (UON) in Nairobi; and Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT) in Juja, Thika. This being a qualitative study (and taking into consideration the subjective views where bias could occur), the researchers ensured that the research was reliable by recording and taking notes during the interviews and by using peer-debriefing and professionals in the field to ascertain their views.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical insights into outsourcing of Information Technology (IT) services in Public University libraries and information centres in Kenya. This study is useful for university libraries, information professionals, information communication technology professionals and university management.

Social implications

The implications of the study are that outsourcing needs to be guided by clear policies that are documented and communicated to all the stakeholders.

Originality/value

This research assesses IT outsourcing services in selected public academic libraries in Kenya.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Grace Wambui Kamau and Aggrey Luyiya Elegwa

The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the collection development process at the University of Nairobi library and suggest ways for improvement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the collection development process at the University of Nairobi library and suggest ways for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was employed to collect, analyze and interpret data from collection development librarians at the University of Nairobi purposively selected. Data were collected through structured interviews and documentary review. Data were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics.

Findings

The study established that the library has a written collection development policy which was revised in 2014 and is strictly adhered to. However, the policy has a gap on the role of faculty as stakeholders in the selection process. In addition, the criteria for selection are not explicitly stated. Findings also indicate that budget allocation, collection development policy, user demands, quality of staff, library consortium and the Public Procurement and Asset Disposal Act of 2015 influence the collection development process at the University of Nairobi Library.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one public university library in Kenya. However, the findings may be applicable in similar university libraries in the country.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may benefit students and faculty in the University of Nairobi from improved collection development process that would ensure that their information needs are met in a timely manner. This would lead to improved research output by students and faculty and ultimately improved research output by the university. University library management may also benefit in improving the collection development process, thereby making it more economical. The findings may also be useful in decision-making and policy development on matters pertaining to collection development at the University of Nairobi and other universities. Furthermore, the findings may be used by researchers to provide context and background information for future research on collection development in public universities locally and regionally.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills the need to make the collection development process in university libraries more efficient by proposing ways of addressing the challenges experienced.

Details

Library Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

George Kingori, Dorothy Njiraine and Stephen Maina

The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of information literacy programmes in the public libraries in Kenya as demonstrated through a case study of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of information literacy programmes in the public libraries in Kenya as demonstrated through a case study of the major public library in the country – Kenya National Library Service (KNLS).

Design/methodology/approach

The use of a case study research design made it possible to establish in-depth personal views, opinions and attitudes of the various respondents through face-to-face interviews and questionnaires. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect data from the respondents. Purposive and random sampling techniques were used, and data were analyzed.

Findings

Major findings of this study indicated that the majority of users at the KNLS relied heavily on the print information materials, while some users, especially researchers, utilized the Internet for their academic work or research. The findings indicated that information literacy should be embedded in the information literacy programmes in all public libraries.

Research limitations/implications

The study was confined to the KNLS. A much wider scope could be untenable, necessitating such limitation.

Practical implications

As KNLS is the national library charged with the responsibility of providing public library services, it is a major player in terms of policies and guidelines. The study will encourage users in public libraries to appreciate the importance of information resources and also sensitize public library administrators to support information literacy programmes.

Social implications

The study will enable the educational administrators to develop and plan relevant instructional models related to information literacy, critical thinking and independent learning. The challenges and solutions experienced at the KNLS can be applied in other public libraries in Kenya.

Originality/value

The study identified the various gaps and challenges that exists in implementation of information literacy programmes in public libraries. Major recommendations of this study are: users should be provided with training on use of information resources; library staff should be provided with methodology skills to make them effective trainers; and public libraries should partner with other stakeholders to provide information literacy programmes. In addition, adequate funding for physical, material and human resources should be provided to facilitate the implementation of information literacy programmes in the public libraries in Kenya.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Stephen M. Mutula

The paper discusses the current status of information technology development in Kenya and assesses how the public universities along with their libraries in the country…

Abstract

The paper discusses the current status of information technology development in Kenya and assesses how the public universities along with their libraries in the country should respond in order to compete effectively in the new technological dispensation and become part of the global information society.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Elisha Ondieki Makori, Dorothy Njiraine and Peninah Talam

This paper aims to assess practical aspects of implementation of institutional repositories (IRs) in Africa with reference to the University of Nairobi and provide useful…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess practical aspects of implementation of institutional repositories (IRs) in Africa with reference to the University of Nairobi and provide useful guidelines to the issues and lessons learned to the other practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used cross-sectional descriptive survey design to gather and analyze data that was both qualitative and quantitative in nature. In addition, questionnaires, interview schedule and observation guide were utilized to collect data from the respondents.

Findings

First, the study established that the IR has not been well integrated into mainstream information services of the library. Second, there is lack of awareness on the use of IR as an information resource on the part of students and staff. Third, there is need to integrate different forms of information into the IR including graphics, video and sound to carter for the whole population of users even those with disabilities. Finally, there is need for aggressive or serious rebranding, marketing and promotion of the IR.

Research limitations/implications

IRs are vital sources of information that are increasingly being integrated and utilized in African higher education. Discussion of the University of Nairobi as a case study provides practical lessons, implications and home grown solutions for other institutions of higher learning in the African context.

Practical implications

IR is not only contemporary or emerging source of knowledge, information and communication but also fundamental or basic in institutions of higher learning. Consequently, IR provides excellent opportunities for universities to expand knowledge beyond internal and external learning environments.

Social implications

Being fundamental sources of knowledge, IRs provide and support teaching, learning, research activities, scholarly communications and community services in universities and the society at large. As information and communication hubs, IRs have reinvented the image and role of universities as sources of knowledge in the society.

Originality/value

Universities need to embrace IRs as vital and valid sources of knowledge and learning. Developing IRs without aggressive rebranding, marketing and promotional strategies is not enough for universities, associated institutions plus the information staff, but with prove that the resources are being utilized to achieve organizational goals and objectives.

Details

New Library World, vol. 116 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Charles N. Nzivo

The purpose of this paper is to provide information on how public libraries and information services in Kenya National Library Service (KNLS) are perceived, by examining…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide information on how public libraries and information services in Kenya National Library Service (KNLS) are perceived, by examining adult users, with a view of improving service delivery and enhancing the effective management of public library services.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey methodology using questionnaires was adopted to solicit required information from 112 respondent adult users and data were analyzed using SPSS version 14.

Findings

The paper shows that KNLS library services and information resources are very positively perceived by most respondents. KNLS libraries are: comparatively better off than universities and other public libraries; are predominantly focused on print documents (books) as preferred sources; readers' mostly begin their search for information on a particular topic; general reading and research purposes and information resources equip users with appropriate knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on adult users in internet‐serviced libraries within the KNLS and thus may not be used to generalize about users of all public libraries in Kenya.

Practical implications

This paper attempts to provide KNLS public libraries with fundamental information about adult users' perspectives of services and information resources. Though the services and information resources are positively perceived, the library management has room to improve and maintain current levels of perception.

Originality/value

The paper is of value because understanding of users' perceptions is vital for services and information resource improvement.

Details

Library Review, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Josephine Orayo, Jane Maina, Jotham Milimo Wasike and Felicitas Ciabere Ratanya

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the customer care practices at the University of Nairobi, Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library (JKML), Kenya.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the customer care practices at the University of Nairobi, Jomo Kenyatta Memorial Library (JKML), Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive research design was used. Simple random sampling technique was used to derive at an appropriate sample from the target population. A structured questionnaire and face-to-face interview was used to collect both quantitative and qualitative data. A total of 384 questionnaires were distributed to students and library staff. Face-to-face interview was conducted among five section heads. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel and presented in tabulated summaries and figures.

Findings

JKML had not only put in place customer care practices but had also provided reliable services with notable professionalism among staff. Users were satisfied with the attention and information resources provided. Challenges encountered related to inadequate ICT infrastructure, lack of a written policy, lack of customer care skills among library staff and lack of managerial support. The study recommended inclusion of customer care in the mainstream of the strategic plan of the university.

Research limitations/implications

The major implication for this study is that sustainable customer care self-assessment needs to be explored in national and private libraries in Kenya.

Practical implications

This study provides a significant practical outlook on marketing-savvy approaches toward customer care and efforts made toward the achievement of the goals of the university.

Originality/value

This study provides insights on good practices on customer care which can be emulated by other academic libraries and adds value to the knowledge base.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Stephen M. Mutula

Public universities in eastern and southern Africa have for a long time depended largely on grants from national governments for most of their recurrent and capital…

Abstract

Public universities in eastern and southern Africa have for a long time depended largely on grants from national governments for most of their recurrent and capital budgets. Statutes of various universities also allow them to get external aid and donations mainly for capital developments, technical assistance and staff training. In the last decade, there has been pressure on public universities in the region to cut back on their budgets as a result of declining government grants occasioned largely by political and economic structural changes. Universities are responding by putting in place a wide range of programmes to generate their own income to augment the dwindling allocation from national governments. This paper discusses current developments within universities in eastern and southern Africa in an environment of rapid technological developments.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

J.N. Otike

An account is given of the current position in documentreproduction and supply in the three East African states of Kenya,Uganda and Tanzania. A brief account is given of…

Abstract

An account is given of the current position in document reproduction and supply in the three East African states of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. A brief account is given of the region′s library/information infrastructure and the state of photocopying and microfilming services is outlined. Factors inhibiting interstate co‐operation are identified.

Details

Library Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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