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1 – 10 of over 64000
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Mikko Kärkkäinen and Jan Holmström

More sophisticated customer demand chains and electronic business pose new challenges to supply chain management. Delivery sizes decrease as a result of more deliveries…

5886

Abstract

More sophisticated customer demand chains and electronic business pose new challenges to supply chain management. Delivery sizes decrease as a result of more deliveries directly to the point of use. Customers are demanding products and deliveries customised to their specific needs. Also, the information concerning small, customised deliveries has to be shared in volatile supply networks. This article analyses the opportunities of wireless product identification technology in transforming supply chain management. A new concept of item level supply chain management and enabling steps to achieve the benefits are proposed. Innovative companies already use wireless product identification with great benefits in specific functional areas, e.g. manufacturing and warehousing. However, the biggest potential is in supply chain wide solutions, i.e. item level supply chain management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1986

George J. Avlonitis

Discusses product line change ‐ the process by which a company alters its product offering ‐ and how it is one of the most important kinds of business activity. Suggests…

Abstract

Discusses product line change ‐ the process by which a company alters its product offering ‐ and how it is one of the most important kinds of business activity. Suggests that product modification and product elimination decisions be treated together as two amongst a number of alternative courses of action. States that the concern is with the “weak product identification” stage of the product modification/elimination process. Posits that there are a number of key performance dimensions/criteria though some of the approaches in this category are concerned only with identifying weak products. Aims to put forward some empirical evidence with regard to the identification of weak products. Implies, in conclusion, that the study indicates that the identification of weak product activities does not resemble the normative models in this area. Identifies that further research needs to be conducted and that these researches should include performance measures to allow normative conclusions to be drawn, perhaps using company interviews

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Shaohui Lei, Xianqing Wang, Leiqing Peng and Yulang Guo

Customization, as a crucial way to meet the heterogeneous demand of individuals, exists two fundamental and competing motivations, namely, assimilation and uniqueness…

Abstract

Purpose

Customization, as a crucial way to meet the heterogeneous demand of individuals, exists two fundamental and competing motivations, namely, assimilation and uniqueness. Based on optimal distinctiveness theory, this paper aims to validate the interactive effect of self-expressive customization types (i.e. customization to express individual identity and customization to express a shared identity) and self-construal on consumers’ willingness to pay a premium (WPP).

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted to provide empirical support for all proposed hypotheses. The first study (n = 151) uses a hypothetical scenario of a basketball game to test the interaction effect of self-expressive customization and self-construal. The second study (n = 184) assumes a scenario of designing a t-shirt or a uniform to examined the moderated mediating role of consumer-product identification.

Findings

The results reveal that independent (vs interdependent) self-construal will have stronger consumer-product identification for customization to express an individual identity (vs customization to express a shared identity), thus generating a higher WPP. Also, perceived task difficulty is the boundary condition of the research model.

Research limitations/implications

This paper makes insightful contributions to the customization literature by strengthening the identity signals of customization and exploring the psychological mechanism and the boundary conditions.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first few empirical studies to examine the impact of self-expressive customization on consumers’ WPP via the identification with the focal object. This paper not only expands the literature of self-expressive customization but also provides a new research direction for the research of person-object interaction in marketing.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Patrick Walsh, Isabell Rhenwrick, Antonio Williams and Adia Waldburger

While brand extensions and licensing are two distinct brand strategies, recent literature suggests that licensing be treated as an “external” brand extension. As both of…

1206

Abstract

Purpose

While brand extensions and licensing are two distinct brand strategies, recent literature suggests that licensing be treated as an “external” brand extension. As both of these strategies have the ability to have positive and negative effects on the team's brand it is important to understand if consumers are aware if they are purchasing licensed products or extensions. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine if consumers are aware when a brand extension or licensing situation is present.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved exposing participants to a total of 16 products (eight brand extensions and eight licensed products) and asking participants to indicate who developed the products they were exposed to.

Findings

The results suggest that participants had a difficult time correctly identifying team licensed products, while in general they were able to successfully identify team brand extensions.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides empirical evidence suggesting that licensed product should not be classified as brand extensions as has been previously suggested. As such, research on brand extensions may not be applicable to licensing and vice versa.

Practical implications

As there is some confusion in regards to who is manufacturing team licensed product, it is important that sport properties choose licensees that produce high quality products to limit potential negative effects on their brand.

Originality/value

This was the first known study to examine differences in consumer awareness of team brand extensions and licensed products.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Gunnar Senneset, Roger Midtstraum, Eskil Forås, Geir Vevle and Ingvill H. Mykland

New technology for equipping returnable transport items (RTI) with unique identification (e.g. RFID) give food industry companies new opportunities for improving business…

Abstract

Purpose

New technology for equipping returnable transport items (RTI) with unique identification (e.g. RFID) give food industry companies new opportunities for improving business processes. The efficient exploitation poses new demands on the information technology systems in general and on the underlying information models in particular. This paper aims to introduce a generic information model where functionality for handling RTIs with unique identification is included.

Design/methodology/approach

Functional requirements are analysed based on process descriptions and use case examples from a real production environment. Detailed information modelling was then done in several iterations using entity‐relationship diagrams. Validation of the model was done based on use cases typical for the food industry.

Findings

The model described is developed within the broad scope of looking at opportunities for using wireless technology to improve business processes and traceability. This includes RFID, RF based sensors, sensor networks and real time location system (RTLS). It is vital that these large amounts of data are linked to identifiable entities for later retrieval and analysis. Unique identification of RTIs can be utilised to ensure that sensor data can be linked both to the RTI and to the content of the RTI. The links between the RTI and the content of the RTI are a basis for improving traceability.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the information model, the next step is to develop a detailed specification for the implementation of the model. The results from the implementation will be used for further evaluation of the model, and might lead to improvements and changes in the model.

Practical implications

Enabling technologies like RFID often lead to changes in existing processes and systems. This work is a contribution to developing more stable and application‐independent information models in food processing companies.

Originality/value

The paper shows that leveraging unique identification of returnable transport items to provide a finer meshed granularity and increased operational visibility of traceable units will not only improve traceability but will also give a more precise basis for process improvements and product differentiation in a food business.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Katia Laura Sidali and Sarah Hemmerling

The purpose of this paper is to develop an authenticity model for food specialties considering both the subjective and the object-based dimensions of authenticity…

1834

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an authenticity model for food specialties considering both the subjective and the object-based dimensions of authenticity. Moreover, the relationship with personality traits – such as consumer self-concept and identification with the product – (antecedents) as well as with the consumption intention (consequences) are measured.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were analyzed by means of a structural equation model using AMOS. Calculations were based on data collected through an online survey of 138 German respondents who were recruited by a consumer panel.

Findings

Both subjective and object-based perceived authenticity significantly influence the purchase intention. Object-based authenticity's role is mediated by the subjective authenticity, which is affected by the consumers self-identification with the product and personality traits such as determination and passion.

Research limitations/implications

The results presented in this paper will help to understand what influences the perception of authenticity of a traditional food product and how it affects purchase intentions. More influencing variables should be considered in future research, as well as other product groups. Repeated analyses considering larger samples are necessary to confirm the presented results.

Practical implications

A deeper understanding of which psychological and social factors affect the perception of a product's authenticity is important for creating appropriate marketing strategies.

Originality/value

While there is a vast literature on authenticity theories, remarkably few scholars have provided empirical evidence on this subject by using a quantitative research design.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Timothy K. Shih, Chuan‐Feng Chiu, Hui‐huang Hsu and Fuhua Lin

The Internet has become a popular medium for information exchange and knowledge delivery. Several traditional social activities have moved to the Internet, such as…

2132

Abstract

The Internet has become a popular medium for information exchange and knowledge delivery. Several traditional social activities have moved to the Internet, such as distance learning, tele‐medical system and. traditional buying and selling activities. Online merchants must know what users want, so providing recommendation services is an important strategy. Analyzes users’ on‐line behavior and interests, and recommends to them new or potential products. The analysis mechanism is based on the correlation among customers, product items, and product features. An algorithm is developed to classify users into groups and the recommendation is based on the classification. The system can help merchants to make suitable business decisions and provide personalized information to the customers. A generic mobile agent framework for e‐commerce applications is proposed. The aforementioned collaborative computing architecture for the recommendation system is based on the framework.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 102 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Thieu Mandos

Describes a variety of coding, reading, processing and opticaltechniques available for non‐standard identification problemsassociated with the marking and reading of…

114

Abstract

Describes a variety of coding, reading, processing and optical techniques available for non‐standard identification problems associated with the marking and reading of products. Techniques covered are vision processing systems to enhance the application of barcodes, optical character reading, and the use of dotcodes. Outlines the advantages of dotcodes and concludes that the combination of a tv‐camera, balanced illumination and an intelligent vision processor allows creative solutions for identification, product recognition, quality control, measuring and positioning.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Kees‐Jan van Dorp

Although government and business interest in tracking and tracing has grown enormously over the last decade, a clear and coherent overview of the topic is still lacking…

4604

Abstract

Although government and business interest in tracking and tracing has grown enormously over the last decade, a clear and coherent overview of the topic is still lacking and is not found in (logistics) literature. This article presents a structure for development and contemporary practices of tracking and tracing. The development structure is conceptualised by three supply‐chain layers: item coding (the physical layer), information architecture (the information layer); and planning and control (the control layer). On behalf of tracking and tracing, the layers represent different levels of supply‐chain integration. The conceptualisation is derived from similar ideas found in literature on supply‐chain management. From a scientific point of view, the structure provides a coherent and systematic organisation of tracking and tracing concepts. From the viewpoint of business administration, the structure facilitates the determination of the scope of tracking and tracing application(s), which is of management value.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Stevan Stankovski, Milovan Lazarević, Gordana Ostojić, Ilija Ćosić and Radenko Puric

The purpose of this paper is to present a new way for identification of products/parts and their tracking during the whole life cycle, from the manufacture and assembly…

1080

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new way for identification of products/parts and their tracking during the whole life cycle, from the manufacture and assembly phase to the disassembly phase.

Design/methodology/approach

Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is applied on a chosen product, an in‐mould labelling (IML) robot.

Findings

This paper discusses a case study that highlights the use of RFID as automatic identification technology, especially in the processes of assembly/disassembly of the IML robot. The application can be expanded onto any kind of product, with the exception of some life cycle phases that are specific for a particular product.

Practical implications

The paper gives an example of how RFID technology can actually be realized in the case of the IML robot to improve the quality of tracking its main components.

Originality/value

The users have the possibilities to access and analyze information about the products/parts during their cycle.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 64000