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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

João Morgado, Inês Flores-Colen, Jorge de Brito and Ana Silva

The purpose of this paper is to propose a maintenance programme for flat roofs in existing buildings, based on the inspection of 26 buildings in-service conditions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a maintenance programme for flat roofs in existing buildings, based on the inspection of 26 buildings in-service conditions, located in the Lisbon region, in Portugal. A proactive maintenance of flat roofs in existing buildings allows reducing their pathology, thus improving their performance and service life.

Design/methodology/approach

The maintenance plan was established based on the degradation state of the maintenance source elements (MSEs) analysed, the aggressiveness of the surrounding environment and the age of the roofs and maintenance actions carried out during the roofing systems’ life cycle.

Findings

The maintenance plan proposed in this study includes the prioritization of the interventions, the definition of the required maintenance operations and the definition of the frequency of the intervention, considering the service lives of the MSEs.

Research limitations/implications

The study addresses only roofs located in the Lisbon area. Even though a relatively large sample of 26 roofs was used, the findings and conclusions can clearly be extrapolated for a much wider scope.

Practical implications

The maintenance plan proposed in this study considers a planning of proactive maintenance operations to continuously and effectively monitor all the relevant MSE.

Originality/value

This plan allows minimizing the incidence and spread of defects, thus enabling the optimization of resources, reducing the costs of the entire maintenance system and improving the quality of the built environment.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter analyses and discusses local government health promotion in Norway.

Approach/methodology

Institutional theory indicates that political and administrative jurisdictions are path dependent in their policy formation and implementation. By using data from different sources this assumption is analysed and discussed according to health promotion in Norwegian municipalities. The main methodology is cross tabulations, bivariate correlations and regression is carried out to supplement analyses.

Findings

Municipalities are path dependent in their health promotion policies. They acknowledge and prioritize health behaviour independent of experienced socio-economic challenges, municipal capacity as size and income, and local government political profile. Competence devoted to health promotion can create changes in policies.

Limitation/policy implications

The rhetoric on determinants and social determinants in particular is new in Norway. Rhetoric on, and interventions, that highlight the social determinants of health need to be coordinated.

Originality

The chapter presents new knowledge on Norwegian local government health promotion and how this is implemented in relation to the challenges experienced.

Details

Technology, Communication, Disparities and Government Options in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-645-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Sripen Tantivess, Román Pérez Velasco, Jomkwan Yothasamut, Adun Mohara, Hatai Limprayoonyong and Yot Teerawattananon

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the roles of social values in the reform of coverage decisions for Thailand's Universal Health Coverage (UC) plan in 2009 and 2010.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the roles of social values in the reform of coverage decisions for Thailand's Universal Health Coverage (UC) plan in 2009 and 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative techniques, including document review and personal communication, were employed for data collection and triangulation. All relevant data and information regarding the reform and three case study interventions were interpreted and analysed according to the thematic elements in the conceptual framework.

Findings

Social values determined changes in the UC plan in two steps: the development of coverage decision guidelines and the introduction of such guidelines in benefit package formulation. The former was guided by process values, while the latter was shaped by different content ideals of stakeholders and policymakers. Analysis of the three interventions suggests that in allocating its resources to subsidise particular services, the UC authority took into account not only cost‐effectiveness, but also budget impacts, equity and solidarity. These social values competed with each other and, in many instances, the prioritisation of benefit candidates was not led solely by evidence, but also by value judgments, even though transparency was recognised as an ultimate goal of reform.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings indicate room for improvement and for future research – the current conceptual framework is inadequate to capture all the crucial elements which influence health prioritisation, as well as their interactions with social values.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in literature as it enhances understanding of the effects of social value judgments in real‐life health prioritisation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Susan P. McGrath, Emily Wells, Krystal M. McGovern, Irina Perreard, Kathleen Stewart, Dennis McGrath and George Blike

Although it is widely acknowledged that health care delivery systems are complex adaptive systems, there are gaps in understanding the application of systems engineering…

Abstract

Although it is widely acknowledged that health care delivery systems are complex adaptive systems, there are gaps in understanding the application of systems engineering approaches to systems analysis and redesign in the health care domain. Commonly employed methods, such as statistical analysis of risk factors and outcomes, are simply not adequate to robustly characterize all system requirements and facilitate reliable design of complex care delivery systems. This is especially apparent in institutional-level systems, such as patient safety programs that must mitigate the risk of infections and other complications that can occur in virtually any setting providing direct and indirect patient care. The case example presented here illustrates the application of various system engineering methods to identify requirements and intervention candidates for a critical patient safety problem known as failure to rescue. Detailed descriptions of the analysis methods and their application are presented along with specific analysis artifacts related to the failure to rescue case study. Given the prevalence of complex systems in health care, this practical and effective approach provides an important example of how systems engineering methods can effectively address the shortcomings in current health care analysis and design, where complex systems are increasingly prevalent.

Details

Structural Approaches to Address Issues in Patient Safety
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-085-6

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Ernest Mensah Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to synthesise lessons from research on adaptation to demonstrate that African countries can explore the opportunities and challenges inherent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesise lessons from research on adaptation to demonstrate that African countries can explore the opportunities and challenges inherent in climate variability and change.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a review work which synthesises lessons from relevant journal articles and other related documents. The literature was retrieved from Google and Google Scholar using search terms such as climate change, climate change and mitigation, climate change and mitigation in Africa, climate change adaptation and mitigation in Africa, climate change vulnerability, climate change impacts, among others. Various combinations of the search terms were also deployed. The journals were subjected to critical review and key lessons synthesised from them and reflections on their future implications in relation to climate risks and vulnerability presented.

Findings

Key lessons were synthesised and reflections on their future implications in relation to climate risks and vulnerability were presented. The evidence seems to suggest that countries in Africa recognise that it is time for them to take action on the impacts of climate change. The key lessons which emerge, going forward, are that climate change adaptation should be mainstreamed into development plans of nations. All efforts should be geared towards sustaining livelihoods of people. Key stakeholders also have a role to play in adaptation. The paper has indicated that although a lot has happened, there are areas that require strengthening and that should be the focus and priority of change and policy makers for the future.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is a synthesis and reflection of existing literature and it is possible that some of the dynamics may have changed since the paper was published.

Practical implications

The dynamics of climate change adaptation is understood. The approaches to adaptation are also explored. Areas worth prioritising in the discourse of adaptation studies have also been indicated.

Originality/value

The syntheses provided are the reflections of the author. The views of the researcher provide insights and understanding into the current adaptation debate.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Paolo Pratali

This paper addresses the problems inherent in identifying technological innovations that can improve company competitiveness with the ultimate aim of increasing the value…

Abstract

This paper addresses the problems inherent in identifying technological innovations that can improve company competitiveness with the ultimate aim of increasing the value of a specific enterprise. A model is proposed that, starting with the competitive weight of a technological innovation to processes or products, yields a strategic weight that enables decision makers to evaluate the increase in business value consequent on application of such innovation. The proposed model is composed of four sub‐models: the first is an analysis of process/product competitiveness aimed at identifying competitive priorities and therefore appropriate technologies; the second sub‐model identifies the priorities of technological intervention from amongst the competitive technologies selected; the third sub‐model correlates the two previous sub‐models and thereby expresses a “strategic weight” of the technological projects with respect to the competitive priorities of the processes or products; the fourth and last sub‐model applies scenario simulation and sustainable growth verification to estimate the impact of strategic project innovations in terms of increased business value.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Roberto Cervelló‐Royo, Rubén Garrido‐Yserte and Baldomero Segura‐García del Río

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis and an optimization model of the spatial impact for the externalities derived from urban regeneration and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis and an optimization model of the spatial impact for the externalities derived from urban regeneration and rehabilitation of degraded and segregated historic heritage areas.

Design/methodology/approach

From the amount invested and state intervention locations, an impact index is put forward. The spatial distribution of these impact indexes in the interventions' area of influence will be the basis for the analysis. Hence, by setting some specific objectives of the decision agent about this distribution homogeneity, and with the aim of avoiding inner segregation and to facilitate the sustainable urban development and cohesion of the neighborhood as a whole, a model which will allow the allocation of the budget available among the different locations fixed a priori is proposed.

Findings

It is found that by comparing the spatial distributions of impact indexes obtained in both situations, a measure of the urban regeneration and rehabilitation process and its impact can be obtained.

Originality/value

In order to favour the neighborhoods' internal cohesion and to avoid inner segregation, the model enables one to better address priority areas of intervention inside a historic heritage urban area and to better achieve sustainable urbanization by providing a more equitable and efficient managing of resources.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Joseph I. Uduji and Elda N. Okolo-Obasi

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the multinational oil companies’ (MOCs) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives in Nigeria. Its special focus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the multinational oil companies’ (MOCs) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives in Nigeria. Its special focus is to investigate the impact of the global memorandum of understanding (GMoU) on rural women livestock keepers in the oil producing communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a quantitative methodology. Data were collected from primary sources using participatory rural appraisal technique. The use of participatory research technique in collecting CSR impact data especially as it concerns the small-scale women livestock keeper is based on the fact that it involves the people being studied, and their views on all the issues are paramount. The primary tool used for household survey (collection of the primary data) is a structured questionnaire which is divided into two sections. Section one of the instrument elicited information on the socio-economic characteristics of respondent, while the other section elicited information on the research questions. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data so as to answer the research questions and test the hypothesis. To answer the research questions, descriptive statistics of measurement of central tendency was used, and the results were presented in tables and charts. While in testing the hypothesis, inferential statistical tool-estimation of logit model (of receipt and non-receipt of MOCs CSR through the GMoU by rural women livestock keepers as function of selected socio-economic and domestic empowerment variables) was used.

Findings

The findings show that GMoU model is gender insensitive as rural women rarely have direct access to livestock interventions except through their husband or adult sons, which is attributed to the cultural and traditional context of the people, anchored in beliefs, norms and practices that breed discrimination and gender gap in the rural societies.

Research limitations/implications

The structured questionnaire was directly administered by the researchers with the help of local research assistants. The use of local research assistants was because of the inability of the researchers to speak the different local languages and dialects of the many ethnic groups of Ijaws, Ogonis, Ikweres, Etches, Ekpeyes, Ogbas, Engennes, Obolos, Isokos, Nembes, Okirikas, Kalabaris, Urhobos, Iteskiris, Igbos, Ika-Igbos, Ndonis, Orons, Ibenos, Yorubas, Ibibios, Anangs, Efiks, Bekwarras, Binis, Eshans, Etsakos, Owans, Itigidis, Epies, Akokoedos, Yakkurs, etc., in the sampled rural communities.

Practical implications

If the rural women do not feel GMoUs efforts to eliminate discrimination and promote equality in the livestock sector, feminized poverty would create a hostile environment for MOCs in the region.

Social implications

The livestock development in Nigeria can only succeed if CSR is able to draw on all the resources and talents and if rural women are able to participate fully in the GMoUs intervention plans and programs.

Originality/value

This research contributes to gender debate in livestock keeping from CSR perspectives in developing countries and rational for demands for social projects by host communities. It concludes that business has an obligation to help in solving problems of public concern, and that CSR priorities in Africa should be aimed toward addressing the peculiarity of the socio-economic development challenges of the country and be informed by socio-cultural influences.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2007

Frederic Carluer

“It should also be noted that the objective of convergence and equal distribution, including across under-performing areas, can hinder efforts to generate growth

Abstract

“It should also be noted that the objective of convergence and equal distribution, including across under-performing areas, can hinder efforts to generate growth. Contrariwise, the objective of competitiveness can exacerbate regional and social inequalities, by targeting efforts on zones of excellence where projects achieve greater returns (dynamic major cities, higher levels of general education, the most advanced projects, infrastructures with the heaviest traffic, and so on). If cohesion policy and the Lisbon Strategy come into conflict, it must be borne in mind that the former, for the moment, is founded on a rather more solid legal foundation than the latter” European Commission (2005, p. 9)Adaptation of Cohesion Policy to the Enlarged Europe and the Lisbon and Gothenburg Objectives.

Details

Managing Conflict in Economic Convergence of Regions in Greater Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-451-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Lynne Friedli and Michael Parsonage

This paper uses economic analysis to develop the case for greater investment in mental health promotion. One example of a common mental health problem for which there is…

Abstract

This paper uses economic analysis to develop the case for greater investment in mental health promotion. One example of a common mental health problem for which there is robust evidence of effective interventions is conduct disorder. The paper estimates that preventing conduct disorders in those children who are most disturbed would save around £150,000 per case (lifetime costs), and that promoting positive mental health in those children with moderate mental health would yield lifetime benefits of around £75,000 per case. Investment in support for parents is therefore the top priority in a provisional list of ‘best buys’ in promoting mental health.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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