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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Graham Matthews

This article reviews recent preservationactivity in Britain, considers the place ofpreservation in library management andlooks to its future development. The manyand broad…

Abstract

This article reviews recent preservation activity in Britain, considers the place of preservation in library management and looks to its future development. The many and broad aspects of preservation which impinge on library management are indicated. Much progress has been made in recent years, but there remain those who need persuading to reassess their attitude towards it. If the current preservation impetus is to be maintained and extended, then the question of funding, in particular, must be successfully addressed. Co‐operative programmes and integration of preservation into overall library management and policy will be significant in achieving this.

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Library Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Paul Eden, John Feather and Graham Matthews

Discusses the results of a questionnaire survey into preservationpolicies and practice in British libraries, focusing on responsibilityfor preservation, preservation

Abstract

Discusses the results of a questionnaire survey into preservation policies and practice in British libraries, focusing on responsibility for preservation, preservation policies, disaster control planning, staff training and user education, co‐operative initiatives, factors inhibiting preservation activity and spending on preservation. Findings indicate that preservation is considered most applicable to special collections and to rare or valuable items, and that funding is a major problem even in libraries with a strong commitment to preservation. Increased activity in areas such as disaster control planning indicate a greater awareness of preservation issues than in the past. Highlights the advantages of written preservation policies and the success of co‐operative initiatives such as Newsplan, suggesting that a national preservation policy would enable libraries to take a more rational approach to problems such as what to preserve and funding allocation, while helping to clarify their national heritage responsibilities.

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Library Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Karen F. Gracy and Michèle Valerie Cloonan

Moving images represent a category of material which has historically received short shrift in most libraries and archives. Film, video, and now digital images form a…

Abstract

Moving images represent a category of material which has historically received short shrift in most libraries and archives. Film, video, and now digital images form a significant part of many library and archival collections, however, and can be found in many formats and genres. Despite the ubiquity of such media in cultural institutions, the majority of libraries and archives owning collections of moving images have neglected these holdings—with the specific exception of those few archives devoted primarily to the care and preservation of moving images.

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Abstract

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-621-2

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 1991

A. Dean Larsen and Randy H. Silverman

Abstract

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Library Technical Services: Operations and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-795-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Stella Ngozi Anasi, Ahiaoma Ibegwam and Stella Olubukunmi Oyediran-Tidings

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preservation and dissemination of women's cultural heritage in selected university libraries in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preservation and dissemination of women's cultural heritage in selected university libraries in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design using questionnaire to collect data was employed.

Findings

The study revealed that non-print materials constitute an average of about 28 per cent of the forms in which cultural heritage materials for women are obtained and preserved in some Nigerian leading academic libraries. Over 50 per cent of the respondents in their views agreed that the benefits are accruable when women's cultural heritage materials are kept including enhancement of public perception of women, improvement in accessibility to information about women, improvement in the visibility of women as essential contributors to the development of the society, fostering of tourism among others. The most prominent barrier that the respondents believed could hamper the preservation of women's cultural heritage materials was the adverse tropical climatic conditions.

Originality/value

It encourages information experts to engage in capacity building for effective preservation and dissemination of cultural heritage information that are gender related. It also stressed the need for networking and collaboration among information experts as an essential strategy in promoting women's cultural heritage information system. All stakeholders are urged to prioritize and demonstrate fiscal commitment towards the preservation of cultural heritage resources. This paper was presented at IFLA Women, Information and Libraries Satellite Conference, 2012.

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Library Review, vol. 62 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Trang Thi Huynh and Cuc Hong Lam

This study aims to investigate the rate of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center – a university at the Mekong Delta and identify users’ behaviors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the rate of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center – a university at the Mekong Delta and identify users’ behaviors that may harm library materials, thereby presenting some potential solutions to enhance librarianship students’ awareness of preservation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on Walker’s (2003) conceptual framework of preservation and that of education and propaganda from awareness development. Using a quantitative approach, 25-item questionnaire was delivered to 133 sophomores and seniors and analyzed by SPSS software. Qualitative data from the open-ended question were recorded and analyzed by themes.

Findings

The findings from this study show that the rate of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center was relatively low compared to that of other libraries in the nation and in the world. In addition, students’ knowledge about how to make the photocopies, as well as how much to open the book, is limited. The most important reason is because of lack of education from school and the library. The research also proposed some effective and realizable solutions to enhance librarianship students’ awareness of preservation of the materials at Learning Resource Center of a Mekong Delta university, Vietnam.

Practical implications

This research provides library staff and users, especially librarianship students, with an awareness of the important role of book preservation, human behavior of library collections and potential preventive ways of book damage. This study also specifies evidence that library lecturers should include ethical issues in their lectures because librarianship students still have limited knowledge of book preservation. By doing so, these actions may motivate librarianship students to continue to learn and apply their knowledge of preservation into library materials and their own documents. Furthermore, the finding of the library work punishment contributes to better understanding of library labor force and students’ personality education. The findings can serve as a reference to educating other users in Vietnam and globally.

Originality/value

The level of print material deterioration at the Learning Resource Center of a Mekong Delta university, Vietnam and library work punishment were observed to be the most important findings with regard to library preservation in a particular library in Southeast Asian country. These findings provide insights into students’ awareness of preservation, not yet discussed in the literature.

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Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Heather Lea Moulaison and A. J. Million

This paper aims to, through an analysis of the current literature, explore the current state of the library e-publishing community and its approach to preservation

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to, through an analysis of the current literature, explore the current state of the library e-publishing community and its approach to preservation. Libraries are increasingly proposing publishing services as part of their work with their communities, and recently, there has been a pronounced interest in providing electronic publishing (e-publishing) services. The library e-publishing community, however, has not systematically studied the need for the long-term preservation of the digital content they help create.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a reflective analysis of the literature, this paper explores the context and the evolution of e-publishing as a trend that aligns with public library missions; in doing so, it also explores implications for digital preservation in the context of these new services and identifies gaps in the literature.

Findings

Digital preservation is an important and worthwhile activity for library e-publishers; preservation of community-based author content cannot, however, be an afterthought and should be planned from the beginning. Future study should take into consideration the needs and expectations of community-based authors. Existing digital preservation guidelines also provide a point of reference for the community and researchers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the understudied area of the importance of digital preservation to library e-publishing. In doing so, it also investigates the role of the library in supporting community-based authors when e-publishing through the library.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Laurel Bowen and Nan McMurry

In recent years, preservation has been viewed as microfilming or other technical operations supervised by specialists in major research libraries. Smaller regional and…

Abstract

In recent years, preservation has been viewed as microfilming or other technical operations supervised by specialists in major research libraries. Smaller regional and local libraries find it difficult to contribute or benefit when preservation is defined so narrowly. This article describes a broader approach to preservation used by an academic library network in a successful team‐building and consciousness‐raising process. A model, based on this approach, that can integrate smaller libraries into the national preservation agenda is suggested.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Whitney Pape and Eric C. Shoaf

Preservation activities have existed in libraries since the early days of librarianship, but these efforts were mostly decentralized and buried in the work of many…

Abstract

Preservation activities have existed in libraries since the early days of librarianship, but these efforts were mostly decentralized and buried in the work of many different departments. Not until the 1970s did library organizations begin to add preservation to organizational charts on a departmental or middle management level, along with its new administrative costs. At that time, libraries were struggling with early efforts at automation and the many changes it would bring to their organizations. Preservation department functions, formerly decentralized from an administrative and budgetary standpoint under the headings of commercial binding, book repair, special collections, or circulation, were now identified as a budget line forced to compete for funds with newly formed library systems departments as well as other traditional library functions. This was particularly difficult given that a large portion of the costs of a comprehensive preservation department were new and additive (Fasana and Baker, 1992, p. 132), yet provided few immediately evident benefits. A burgeoning library systems unit could place libraries on the cutting edge of technology; automated card catalogs could improve productivity and efficiency for staff, and also provide for better patron access to collections. Needless to say, systems departments were much better funded than preservation units at this time.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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