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1 – 10 of over 2000
Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Nancy J. Adler

Our children may learn about the heroes of the past.Our task is to make ourselves architects of the future.The twenty-first century confronts society with challenges that…

Abstract

Our children may learn about the heroes of the past.

Our task is to make ourselves architects of the future.

The twenty-first century confronts society with challenges that will determine the future of humanity and the planet. Such challenges defy traditional analysis. Paralyzed by the inadequacy of our standard logic, on which much of traditional scholarship relies, we search for meaningful and effective understandings that can guide us – understandings that seem inherently wise and just, and not simply empirically confirmable. Few of us question the need for wisdom, yet to date, academic scholarship has failed to address the role that it plays, and could play, in supporting international organizational processes capable of addressing the world’s most demanding societal challenges.2 This chapter explores the nature of pragmatic wisdomwisdom that incorporates both profound understanding and action. It uses the founding of an international development initiative, Uniterra, to highlight the need for and influence of wisdom in international organizational processes and outcomes. Uniterra’s core structure and central process involve partnering – forming networks of non-hierarchical relationships. The chapter therefore investigates the wisdom needed to create and maintain global partnerships. Given the chapter’s focus on pragmatic wisdom, it also explores the concepts of hope and courage, for without hope and courage, wisdom could never move beyond conceptualization to action. The writing style purposely differs from that of most scholarly articles. Beyond presenting a specific case, the writing offers readers the opportunity to experience wisdom via indigenous proverbs from a wide range of the world’s more pragmatic wisdom traditions. So as not to interrupt readers’ appreciation of the proverbs or reduce their impact or meaning merely to the underlying logical constructs, the chapter uses endnotes rather than more traditional text references.

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Nancy J. Adler

The 21st century confronts society with challenges that will determine the future of humanity and the planet. Such challenges defy traditional analysis. Paralyzed by the…

Abstract

The 21st century confronts society with challenges that will determine the future of humanity and the planet. Such challenges defy traditional analysis. Paralyzed by the inadequacy of our standard logic, on which much of traditional scholarship relies, we search for meaningful and effective understandings that can guide us—understandings that seem inherently wise and just, and not simply empirically confirmable. Few of us question the need for wisdom, yet to date, academic scholarship has failed to address the role that it plays, and could play, in supporting international organizational processes capable of addressing the world’s most demanding societal challenges. 2 This chapter explores the nature of pragmatic wisdomwisdom that incorporates both profound understanding and action. It uses the founding of an international development initiative, Uniterra, to highlight the need for and influence of wisdom in international organizational processes and outcomes. Uniterra’s core structure and central process involve partnering—forming networks of nonhierarchical relationships. The chapter therefore investigates the wisdom needed to create and maintain global partnerships. Given the chapter’s focus on pragmatic wisdom, it also explores the concepts of hope and courage, for without hope and courage, wisdom could never move beyond conceptualization to action. The writing style purposely differs from that of most scholarly articles. Beyond presenting a specific case, the writing offers readers the opportunity to experience wisdom via indigenous proverbs from a wide range of the world’s more pragmatic wisdom traditions. So as not to interrupt readers’ appreciation of the proverbs or reduce their impact or meaning merely to the underlying logical constructs, the chapter uses endnotes rather than more traditional text references.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Cassie L. Barnhardt and Carson W. Phillips

This chapter presents the major components in framing a developmental model of wise organizing in the field of higher education that proceeds along an increasingly more…

Abstract

This chapter presents the major components in framing a developmental model of wise organizing in the field of higher education that proceeds along an increasingly more just and responsible path. Our argument considers individual student development theories that lead one to greater competence for wise and socially responsible interactions and engagement in society, and aligns these individual processes with the organizational scholarship emphasizing how organizations enhance their capacities for wise and socially responsible conduct. After reviewing these arguments, we frame a set of research topics required for empirically identifying how universities can cultivate wisdom.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-222-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Values, Rationality, and Power: Developing Organizational Wisdom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-942-2

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Milorad M. Novicevic, Michael Harvey, Niranjan Pati, Thomas Kuffel and Thomas Hench

This paper examines the limits of pragmatism in strategy formulation in the new, knowledge‐rich economy. By tracing the history of pragmatism in social and management…

1796

Abstract

This paper examines the limits of pragmatism in strategy formulation in the new, knowledge‐rich economy. By tracing the history of pragmatism in social and management thought, and assessing the commonalties and complementarities between a firm’s vision and mission, we explore the possibility and consequences of an intangible resource curse for firms pursuing strategies of incessant pragmatic growth in the expanding Web‐based domain. Ultimately, we posit a combined influence of market‐based governance and strategy simplification as an effective antidote to the executive intangible resource binging, which is sustainable as long as confidence and trust continue to be shared among the firm stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Yasamin Abedini

The present study aimed to predict department heads' wisdom in Tehran universities based on their metacognitive beliefs and gender.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aimed to predict department heads' wisdom in Tehran universities based on their metacognitive beliefs and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a nonexperimental design. The statistical population consisted of all male and female heads of departments in Tehran universities, among whom 150 participants were selected using Morgan's table and via the random sampling method. The research instruments were the Meta-Cognitive Beliefs Questionnaire (Wells, 1997) and the Wisdom Scale (Schmit et al., 2012). The data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis and independent-samples t-test.

Findings

The total scores of male and female principals were significantly different in the two scales and some of their subscales. The metacognitive beliefs scale and its components were good and significant predictors of the principals' wisdom. Cognitive self-awareness was the best positive predictor, and positive beliefs about worries were the best negative predictor for their wisdom.

Practical implications

Wise department heads are usually more empathetic, and this makes their decisions for the well-being and satisfaction of their colleagues as well as the students. Therefore, when faculty members are more satisfied and relaxed, they can do their teaching better and establish more effective relationships with their students. They should also be more motivated to do scientific research studies. Because wise managers are happier and more relaxed, they can focus more on solving educational problems in their department, and this, in turn, improves the educational quality of their department. The higher the quality of the university educational system, the less stress and the more mental health the students will have. Students in such educational environments are more focused on learning courses and gain better expertise. These students will provide more specialized services to the community in the future.

Social implications

Wisdom is associated with better contributing to a happy life, and as a result, we have a healthier and more productive society.

Originality/value

It can be concluded that positive metacognitive knowledge, such as cognitive self-awareness via affecting the principals' mental awareness and regulating thoughts, and negative metacognitive experiences, such as worrying about the future, low meta memory and sensitive-obsessive control negatively affecting their affective and cognitive states, affect the principals' decisions and behaviors in educational settings. According to the results of this research, university presidents can hold workshops to increases metacognitive skills to their administrators and teachers. Also, the results of the present study can help the heads of university departments to establish more constructive and effective relationships with the faculty members and students by strengthening their metacognitive skills.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Jennifer Rowley and Paul Gibbs

Although the notion of wisdom confronts the economic rationale of business organizations, this paper aims to argue that organizations are coming under increasing pressure…

7128

Abstract

Purpose

Although the notion of wisdom confronts the economic rationale of business organizations, this paper aims to argue that organizations are coming under increasing pressure not only to learn, change and adapt, but also to take actions that are ethically acceptable and respond to the expectations of multiple stakeholders, or in other words to act wisely. Accordingly this article seeks to progress the debate on the relationship between organizational learning, learning organizations and wisdom, in pursuit of a new version of the model of the learning organization, the practically wise organization.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the literature on the learning organization and organizational learning is reviewed with a view to the identification of useful models and concepts. The paucity of reference to wisdom in that literature is noted. The following sections develop the theme of practical wisdom and, the essence of the practically wise organization, respectively. Finally a model for the practically wise organization that is both a virtuous and a learning organization is proposed.

Findings

The paper finds that a practically wise organization is a learning organization whose learning architecture is based on the principles of practical wisdom. Such an organization manages the processes associated with the seven pillars of wisdom: understanding dynamic complexity; developing personal wisdom competency; deliberating towards ethical models; refreshing shared sustainable vision; group wisdom dynamics; deliberated praxis; and embodied learning.

Originality/value

The article is a first step towards extending the theory and practice associated with the learning organization and organizational learning to embrace the multi‐stakeholder, ethically and morally informed perspectives embedded in the notion of practical wisdom.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Henri‐Claude de Bettignies, Po Keung Ip, Xuezhu Bai, André Habisch and Gilbert Lenssen

This paper aims to provide an overview of this special issue.

1909

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The guest editorial introduces the papers in this special issue, focusing on practical wisdom for management from the Chinese classical traditions.

Findings

Chinese culture increasingly will permeate international culture and move from peripheral to mainstream status. To ignore this in management education would be a grave oversight.

Originality/value

The issue offers insights into the value of practical wisdom from Confucianism, the origins of Chinese classical trditions and Daoism, and the various streams of thought within the classical Chinese traditions and their contemporary relevance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

1057

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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