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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Angeliki Paidakaki, Rani De Becker, Yana De Reu, Febe Viaene, Shareen Elnaschie and Pieter Van den Broeck

This paper explores social resilience through the lenses of migration. It specifically studies the role of community architects in building socially resilient refugee…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores social resilience through the lenses of migration. It specifically studies the role of community architects in building socially resilient refugee camps which are human settlements characterized by a transient and heterogeneous community with unique vulnerabilities. These settlements are managed through exceptional governance arrangements between hegemonic and counter-hegemonic humanitarian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidences are drawn from the Office of Displaced Designers (ODD), a design-focused creative integration organization active on Lesvos island. During one-month ethnographic research with ODD, empirical data were harvested through an extensive review of project archive materials including transcripts and audio files of interviews with project participants and collaborators conducted by ODD, architectural drawings and teaching materials, photo and video archives and administrative documents. The ethnographic research was complemented with semi-structured interviews with the founding members and former volunteers and partners of ODD; key site visits to the Moria Hotspot and the surrounding Olive Groves; as well as a desk study on European Union (EU) policies and legislative papers and legal information regarding the asylum seeker application procedure in Europe and Greece.

Findings

Reflecting on the potential and limitations of community architects in building socially resilient refugee camps, the paper concludes that in order for community architects to make long lasting improvements they must think holistically and design flexible structural solutions for the entire camp, leverage existing expertise within communities and assist other organizations through administrative, financial and design consultancy support. Community architects are also expected to take active roles in forming pro-equity governance structures and steering pro-resilient humanitarian trajectories by acting as mediators, lobbying their partners, advocating for inclusive practices and social spaces and documenting their projects to build an evidence base across practices and contexts and to strengthen their voice as a collective of community architects.

Originality/value

The role of community architects in building socially resilient human settlements in post-disaster place-based recovery processes has been widely discussed in the disaster scholarship. These studies have primarily emphasized permanent and in situ reconstruction efforts in disaster-affected areas. What remains limitedly discussed is the resilience-building potential of community architects in extraterritorial temporary human settlements characterized by displacement and temporality such as in refugee camps. In light of these observations, the aim of this paper is to push the boundaries of knowledge on post-crisis recovery by re-approaching the notion of social resilience from a migratory perspective and revealing the potential and limitations of community architects in fostering socially resilient refugee camps in new (national) territories.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Annals in Social Responsibility, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3515

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 December 2022

Kunio Shirahada and Alan Wilson

Given the importance of senior volunteers in an ageing society, this study aims to deepen the understanding of how seniors create well-being by volunteering as service…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of senior volunteers in an ageing society, this study aims to deepen the understanding of how seniors create well-being by volunteering as service providers in terms of motivations for volunteer participation and value co-creation/co-destruction in service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

Focussing on senior volunteers acting as service providers in the tourism sector, this study conducted a programme of qualitative research with 15 senior volunteer tour guides in Japan and the UK through the purposive sampling method. The data were analysed by the Gioia method to identify data structure and create a conceptual model.

Findings

Seniors start with a mixture of different motivations, not only symbolic and health ones. However, after a certain period of training, they become more aware of their volunteer role as service providers and may strive to maximise the benefits to their clients. The overall performance of such a role supports their well-being. They may also experience episodes of value co-destruction; such negative experiences may be overcome by building good relationships with their colleagues in the organisation.

Practical implications

The paper identifies organisational support ideas for senior service provider volunteers aimed at overcoming negative experiences and achieving well-being, in terms of training and improved communication between organisation members.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the transformative service research literature by constructing a model to showcase the relationship amongst expectations of volunteering as a service provider, service delivery and well-being creation. This paper also discusses the positive and negative effects of volunteer service delivery on senior volunteers' well-being.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Helena Varnaseri, Tony Lavender and Lona Lockerbie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether early maladaptive schema (EMS) and autobiographical memory specificity mediate the relationship between abuse and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether early maladaptive schema (EMS) and autobiographical memory specificity mediate the relationship between abuse and attachment in childhood with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) characteristics among forensic inpatients.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative cross-sectional design. In total, 34 male adults residing in medium secure facilities completed self-report measures. Data were analysed using bootstrapped mediation procedures.

Findings

The study’s hypotheses received partial support. The EMS of “entitlement/grandiosity” and autobiographical memory specificity differentially mediated the relationship between emotional and physical abuse and neglect, and parental care and overprotection with BPD characteristics, including trait anger and the frequent expression of anger. In line with attachment theory and the functional avoidance mechanism (Williams et al., 2007), the proposed mediators are conceptualised as adaptive responses to early adversity with potential maladaptive consequences for later interpersonal functioning.

Research limitations/implications

These provisional findings will require further exploration with specific investigation of the relationship between EMS and autobiographical memory specificity. It is recommended that future research replicates the study’s design with a larger sample and investigate the role of other mediators and moderators in this complex relationship. Examples of these are mentalisation, social problem-solving capabilities, social support and adult attachment styles.

Practical implications

Clinical implications encourage the incorporation of these mediators into clinical formulation, intervention and ward practices.

Originality/value

For forensic inpatients with a history of adversity, interventions working directly with EMS and specificity of autobiographical memory, e.g. schema therapy (Young, 1999), mentalisation and mindfulness may be useful. Furthermore, the relationship between EMS and specificity of autobiographical memory with interpersonal experience and functioning can be incorporated into clinical formulation.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Castro N. Gichuki, Simon K. Gicheha and Charles Wambu Kamau

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of GLOBALGAP standards certification on farmer's preference for marketing contract choices including written…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of GLOBALGAP standards certification on farmer's preference for marketing contract choices including written contracts, oral contracts and spot contracts, as well as to establish the impact of marketing contracts on net returns from snap bean production in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we use a data collected from 446 Snap bean farmers in Kenya. Using a two-step selection Bourguignon Frontier and Gurgand (BFG) model and Propensity Score Matching (PSM), we analysed determinants of Global Gap Certification and other farming characteristics that influence smallholder farmers preference for marketing contracts and net returns from snap beans venture.

Findings

Results indicate that attending GLOBALGAP training, GLOBALGAP subsidy support, membership to GLOBALGAP farmer's groups, and selling beans to GLOBALGAP certified GLOBALGAP buyers would significantly influence better returns underwritten marketing contracts. Producing snap beans underwritten marketing contracts would get farmer's net returns of between 1.8 and 8% while producing under oral and spot market contracts would earn farmer net returns of between 0.2 and 0.08 %.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to examine the influence of GLOBALGAP standards certification on marketing contract choices and net returns from snap bean production, while accounting for selectivity biasness.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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