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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Angeliki Paidakaki, Rani De Becker, Yana De Reu, Febe Viaene, Shareen Elnaschie and Pieter Van den Broeck

This paper explores social resilience through the lenses of migration. It specifically studies the role of community architects in building socially resilient refugee camps which…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores social resilience through the lenses of migration. It specifically studies the role of community architects in building socially resilient refugee camps which are human settlements characterized by a transient and heterogeneous community with unique vulnerabilities. These settlements are managed through exceptional governance arrangements between hegemonic and counter-hegemonic humanitarian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical evidences are drawn from the Office of Displaced Designers (ODD), a design-focused creative integration organization active on Lesvos island. During one-month ethnographic research with ODD, empirical data were harvested through an extensive review of project archive materials including transcripts and audio files of interviews with project participants and collaborators conducted by ODD, architectural drawings and teaching materials, photo and video archives and administrative documents. The ethnographic research was complemented with semi-structured interviews with the founding members and former volunteers and partners of ODD; key site visits to the Moria Hotspot and the surrounding Olive Groves; as well as a desk study on European Union (EU) policies and legislative papers and legal information regarding the asylum seeker application procedure in Europe and Greece.

Findings

Reflecting on the potential and limitations of community architects in building socially resilient refugee camps, the paper concludes that in order for community architects to make long lasting improvements they must think holistically and design flexible structural solutions for the entire camp, leverage existing expertise within communities and assist other organizations through administrative, financial and design consultancy support. Community architects are also expected to take active roles in forming pro-equity governance structures and steering pro-resilient humanitarian trajectories by acting as mediators, lobbying their partners, advocating for inclusive practices and social spaces and documenting their projects to build an evidence base across practices and contexts and to strengthen their voice as a collective of community architects.

Originality/value

The role of community architects in building socially resilient human settlements in post-disaster place-based recovery processes has been widely discussed in the disaster scholarship. These studies have primarily emphasized permanent and in situ reconstruction efforts in disaster-affected areas. What remains limitedly discussed is the resilience-building potential of community architects in extraterritorial temporary human settlements characterized by displacement and temporality such as in refugee camps. In light of these observations, the aim of this paper is to push the boundaries of knowledge on post-crisis recovery by re-approaching the notion of social resilience from a migratory perspective and revealing the potential and limitations of community architects in fostering socially resilient refugee camps in new (national) territories.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Annals in Social Responsibility, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3515

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2023

María Eugenia Cardenal, Octavio Díaz-Santana and Sara M. González-Betancor

The teacher role in the classroom can explain important aspects of the student's school experience. The teacher-student relationship, a central dimension of social capital…

Abstract

Purpose

The teacher role in the classroom can explain important aspects of the student's school experience. The teacher-student relationship, a central dimension of social capital, influences students' engagement, and the teaching style plays an important role in student outcomes. But there is scarce literature that links teaching styles to teacher-student relationship. This article aims to (1) analyze whether there is a relationship between teaching styles and the type of relationship perceived by students; (2) test whether this relationship is equally strong for any teaching style; and (3) determine the extent to which students' perceptions vary according to their profile.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation model with four latent variables is estimated: two for the teacher-student relationship (emotional vs educational) and two for the teaching styles (directive vs participative), with information for 21,126 sixth-grade primary-students in 2019 in Spain.

Findings

Teacher-student relationships and teaching styles are interconnected. The participative style implies a better relationship. The perceptions of the teacher are heterogeneous, depending on gender (girls perceive clearer than boys) and with the educational background (children from lower educational background perceive both types of teaching styles more clearly).

Originality/value

The analysis is based on the point of view of the addressee of the teacher's work, i.e. the student. It provides a model that can be replicated in any other education system. The latent variables, based on a periodically administered questionnaire, could be estimated with data from diagnostic assessments in other countries, which in turn would allow the formulation of context-specific educational policy proposals that take into account student feedback.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2024

Nasser Shahrasbi, Mina Rohani, Mostafa Purmehdi and Ali Rajabzadeh Ghatari

This study aims to explore and empirically examine an integrative model of the customer revenge process by linking two well-established theories of self-determination theory (SDT…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore and empirically examine an integrative model of the customer revenge process by linking two well-established theories of self-determination theory (SDT) and appraisal theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 901 respondents, followed by a post-hoc survey of 712 individuals, was conducted to examine the autonomous versus controlled orientations for revenge motivation.

Findings

The results show that customers’ orientation of motivation (OM) can regulate their revenge behavior (direct versus indirect) in case of service failures. Specifically, the interaction of OM components (i.e. autonomy, relatedness and competence) can play a significant role in the relationship between revenge predictors and revenge behavior. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper offers a novel conceptual framework to explain the moderating effects of OM on the relationship between revenge predictors and revenge behavior. This study extends the application of SDT to the context of customer anger and revenge.

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2023

Kemefasu Ifie

This paper aims to investigate the effect of top management’s customer interactions (TMCI) on customer satisfaction. This study argues that TMCI’s overall relationship with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of top management’s customer interactions (TMCI) on customer satisfaction. This study argues that TMCI’s overall relationship with customer satisfaction follows an inverted-U shape due to its positive and disruptive effects on the customer relationship efforts of frontline service/sales employees (FSEs). This paper further investigates the frontline competence of both FSEs and the top management team (TMT) as moderators of the impact of TMCI on customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model was tested empirically using data from managers, frontline employees and customers of microfinance firms. A multilevel structural equation modeling approach was used to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

The results show that TMCI has a curvilinear relationship with customer satisfaction. The results also show that frontline employees’ collective efficacy attenuates this relationship by shifting the turning point of the curvilinear effect to the right. Furthermore, TMT frontline competence amplifies both the positive and negative effects of TMCI on customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This study advances knowledge on the effects of TMCI on customer satisfaction and highlights the nuanced relationship between top management involvement and indicators of firm performance.

Practical implications

The findings show the importance of considering the frontline competence of both top management and frontline employees when encouraging TMCI in organizations.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this study is one of the first to examine TMCI’s direct impact on customer satisfaction and propose the frontline competence of both top management and frontline employees as boundary conditions on this relationship.

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2023

Alphonse Singbo and Jourdain Chambord Lokossou

The farm sector is crucial for rural poverty alleviation, alongside the non-farm sector, which contributes to mitigating risks associated with crop failures. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The farm sector is crucial for rural poverty alleviation, alongside the non-farm sector, which contributes to mitigating risks associated with crop failures. This paper investigates the effects of public policies on productive employment within both the farm and non-farm sectors in sub-Saharan Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A meta-analysis is conducted exclusively on the results of the Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP)-funded studies under the Policy Analysis on Growth and Employment (PAGE II) initiative. Selected studies focused on the impact of public policies on productive employment in rural farm and non-farm sectors, encompassing a total of nine sub-Saharan Africa countries in: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Lesotho, Nigeria, Senegal and South Africa.

Findings

The results indicate that public investments in rural areas and public policies that facilitate access to productive resources are likely to enhance productive employment. The overall effect size is positive and significant, ranging from 2% to 10% increases in productive employment. Sources of variation include the sector of activity and the policy instrument. In addition, the policy effects are gender-sensitive and seem more consistent in the non-farm sector.

Research limitations/implications

Although the selected working papers addressed several aspects of productive employment, other aspects warrant further investigation. Policies involving restrictions or regulations have received little attention in the impact analysis. Researches to fill this gap would be important. Another suggestion for further research is the analysis of the relative importance of non-farm employment in rural areas in developing countries. It is always assumed that rural households depend heavily on agriculture for their subsistence.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper lies in the comparative analysis of numerous public policies implemented in nine distinct countries. By consolidating data from fourteen 14 different experiences into a single study, the paper offers valuable insights on factors that determine policy effectiveness and contribute to understanding what worked for whom and why.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 December 2022

Kunio Shirahada and Alan Wilson

Given the importance of senior volunteers in an ageing society, this study aims to deepen the understanding of how seniors create well-being by volunteering as service providers…

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Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of senior volunteers in an ageing society, this study aims to deepen the understanding of how seniors create well-being by volunteering as service providers in terms of motivations for volunteer participation and value co-creation/co-destruction in service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

Focussing on senior volunteers acting as service providers in the tourism sector, this study conducted a programme of qualitative research with 15 senior volunteer tour guides in Japan and the UK through the purposive sampling method. The data were analysed by the Gioia method to identify data structure and create a conceptual model.

Findings

Seniors start with a mixture of different motivations, not only symbolic and health ones. However, after a certain period of training, they become more aware of their volunteer role as service providers and may strive to maximise the benefits to their clients. The overall performance of such a role supports their well-being. They may also experience episodes of value co-destruction; such negative experiences may be overcome by building good relationships with their colleagues in the organisation.

Practical implications

The paper identifies organisational support ideas for senior service provider volunteers aimed at overcoming negative experiences and achieving well-being, in terms of training and improved communication between organisation members.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the transformative service research literature by constructing a model to showcase the relationship amongst expectations of volunteering as a service provider, service delivery and well-being creation. This paper also discusses the positive and negative effects of volunteer service delivery on senior volunteers' well-being.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2023

Cristina Fernandes, João Ferreira and Pedro Mota Veiga

The purpose of this study is use a bibliometric analysis to explore the relational nature of knowledge creation in WFM in operations. Companies live under constant pressure to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is use a bibliometric analysis to explore the relational nature of knowledge creation in WFM in operations. Companies live under constant pressure to find the best ways to plan their workforce, and the workforce emangement (WFM) is one of the biggest challenges faced by managers. Relevant research on WFM in operations has been published in a several range of journals that vary in their scope and readership, and thus the academic contribution to the topic remains largely fragmented.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this gap, this review aims to map research on WFM in operations to understand where it comes from and where it is going and, therefore, provides opportunities for future work. This study combined two bibliometric approaches with manual document coding to examine the literature corpus of WFM in operations to draw a holistic picture of its different aspects.

Findings

Content and thematic analysis of the seminal studies resulted in the extraction of three key research themes: workforce cross-training, planning workforce mixed methods and individual workforce characteristics. The findings of this study further highlight the gaps in the WFM in operations literature and raise some research questions that warrant further academic investigation in the future.

Originality/value

Likewise, this study has important implications for practitioners who are likely to benefit from a holistic understanding of the different aspects of WFM in operations.

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Helena Varnaseri, Tony Lavender and Lona Lockerbie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether early maladaptive schema (EMS) and autobiographical memory specificity mediate the relationship between abuse and attachment in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether early maladaptive schema (EMS) and autobiographical memory specificity mediate the relationship between abuse and attachment in childhood with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) characteristics among forensic inpatients.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative cross-sectional design. In total, 34 male adults residing in medium secure facilities completed self-report measures. Data were analysed using bootstrapped mediation procedures.

Findings

The study’s hypotheses received partial support. The EMS of “entitlement/grandiosity” and autobiographical memory specificity differentially mediated the relationship between emotional and physical abuse and neglect, and parental care and overprotection with BPD characteristics, including trait anger and the frequent expression of anger. In line with attachment theory and the functional avoidance mechanism (Williams et al., 2007), the proposed mediators are conceptualised as adaptive responses to early adversity with potential maladaptive consequences for later interpersonal functioning.

Research limitations/implications

These provisional findings will require further exploration with specific investigation of the relationship between EMS and autobiographical memory specificity. It is recommended that future research replicates the study’s design with a larger sample and investigate the role of other mediators and moderators in this complex relationship. Examples of these are mentalisation, social problem-solving capabilities, social support and adult attachment styles.

Practical implications

Clinical implications encourage the incorporation of these mediators into clinical formulation, intervention and ward practices.

Originality/value

For forensic inpatients with a history of adversity, interventions working directly with EMS and specificity of autobiographical memory, e.g. schema therapy (Young, 1999), mentalisation and mindfulness may be useful. Furthermore, the relationship between EMS and specificity of autobiographical memory with interpersonal experience and functioning can be incorporated into clinical formulation.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Castro N. Gichuki, Simon K. Gicheha and Charles Wambu Kamau

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of GLOBALGAP standards certification on farmer's preference for marketing contract choices including written contracts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of GLOBALGAP standards certification on farmer's preference for marketing contract choices including written contracts, oral contracts and spot contracts, as well as to establish the impact of marketing contracts on net returns from snap bean production in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we use a data collected from 446 Snap bean farmers in Kenya. Using a two-step selection Bourguignon Frontier and Gurgand (BFG) model and Propensity Score Matching (PSM), we analysed determinants of Global Gap Certification and other farming characteristics that influence smallholder farmers preference for marketing contracts and net returns from snap beans venture.

Findings

Results indicate that attending GLOBALGAP training, GLOBALGAP subsidy support, membership to GLOBALGAP farmer's groups, and selling beans to GLOBALGAP certified GLOBALGAP buyers would significantly influence better returns underwritten marketing contracts. Producing snap beans underwritten marketing contracts would get farmer's net returns of between 1.8 and 8% while producing under oral and spot market contracts would earn farmer net returns of between 0.2 and 0.08 %.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to examine the influence of GLOBALGAP standards certification on marketing contract choices and net returns from snap bean production, while accounting for selectivity biasness.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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