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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Tahereh Heydarnejad, Azar Hosseini Fatemi and Behzad Ghonsooly

For this purpose, Teacher Self-Regulation Scale (TSRS), Emotions Questionnaire for Teachers (EQT) and Grasha's Teaching Style Inventory (TSI) were employed to gauge the…

Abstract

Purpose

For this purpose, Teacher Self-Regulation Scale (TSRS), Emotions Questionnaire for Teachers (EQT) and Grasha's Teaching Style Inventory (TSI) were employed to gauge the influences of teacher self-regulation on university teachers' emotions and preferred teaching style. The participants of this study were 320 university teachers, majored in different branches of English (English Literature, English Teaching, English Translation), teaching in different universities of Iran. To shed light on the causal associations, a path analysis was run using LISREL 8.80.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the pivotal role of effective teaching on educational well-being, the present study delve into three significant teacher-related variables i.e. teacher self-regulation, emotions and teaching style. For this purpose, TSRS, EQT, and Grasha's TSI were employed to gauge the influences of teacher self-regulation on university teachers' emotions and preferred teaching style. The participants of this study were 320 university teachers, majored in different branches of English (English Literature, English Teaching, English Translation), teaching in different universities of Iran. To shed light on the causal associations, a path analysis was run using LISREL 8.80.

Findings

Based on the findings, teacher self-regulation predicts pleasant emotions positively; whereas, it predicts unpleasant emotions in a negative direction. The results also demonstrate that teacher self-regulation positively and significantly predicts student-centred styles (Facilitator and Delegator), and the reverse is true for teacher-centred styles (Formal Authority, Personal Model, and Expert).

Research limitations/implications

Future studies may advance the possible relationships among the subscales of teacher self-regulation, teacher emotion and teaching style. Also, further investigations are suggested to target the teacher self-regulation, teacher emotion and teaching style in enhancing language learners' achievement.

Practical implications

In effect, the findings of the current study contribute to the fields of teacher psychology and teacher education. The implications of this study may open another perspective into university teachers’ psychological well-being and professional development.

Social implications

The implications of this study may redound to the advantage of policy makers, curriculum designers, teacher educators, as well as university teachers.

Originality/value

The implications of this study may redound to the advantage of policy-makers, curriculum designers, teacher educators and university teachers.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

S. Visser, S. McChlery and N. Vreken

Individuals learn in different ways, using several learning styles, but lecturers may not always present information and learning experiences that match students’ learning…

Abstract

Individuals learn in different ways, using several learning styles, but lecturers may not always present information and learning experiences that match students’ learning preferences. Mismatches between learning and teaching styles can lead to disappointment with the course of study, personal discouragement and underperformance. The learning styles of 735 undergraduate Accounting students and the teaching styles of 46 lecturers from one United Kingdom and one South African university were empirically surveyed, using the Felder‐Solomon Index of Learning Styles questionnaire to consider the students’ learning styles, and an adaptation of the questionnaire to analyse the lecturers’ teaching styles. The study compared learning and teaching styles between two universities in two different countries and then examined possible matches/mismatches between learning and teaching styles. Little mismatch was found (p‐values smaller than 0.3). Other results are discussed and recommendations are made in relation to understanding and meeting students’ learning needs and the needs of professional bodies.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Hayward P. Andres and Obasi H. Akan

The purpose of this paper is to determine if “fit” and “non-fit” between authoritarian versus demonstrator teaching and visual versus verbal learning preferences differ in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if “fit” and “non-fit” between authoritarian versus demonstrator teaching and visual versus verbal learning preferences differ in impact on Chinese MBA student academic performance in a large local urban Chinese university setting. In addition, the role of Chinese cultural behavioral tendencies in dictating specific teaching and learning style preferences among Chinese MBA students is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were 135 Chinese MBA students that indicated their learning style preference (verbal or visual) and predominant teaching style encountered (authoritarian or demonstrator). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) main effects were used to identify the best teaching style and best learning style. ANOVA interaction effects were used to test the meshing hypothesis (i.e. teaching-learning style “fit” versus “non-fit” conditions).

Findings

The results provided support for the mesh hypothesis – teaching style – learning style fit does matter. In general, authoritarian teaching was superior to demonstrator, and verbal learning was superior to visual. Findings also suggest that the demonstrator teaching style may better handle different learning styles (e.g. both verbal and visual) simultaneously as compared to the classic authoritarian teaching style.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support and contribute to the body of knowledge about the mesh hypothesis and provide the foundations for further longitudinal studies evaluating teaching and learning styles learning styles in a multicultural and cross-cultural context. A limitation of the study is that self-report responses were used and the data were collected at one Chinese university.

Practical implications

The results suggest that instructors are likely to reach only a selected few students if it is assumed that all students learn in the same way or based on cultural orientation alone. University administrators should be aware of the role of cultural tendencies related to teaching and learning and how cross-cultural communication and multicultural awareness can provide insights into strategies for social and academic integration of foreign students.

Originality/value

To date, the meshing hypothesis has received far less theoretical or empirical attention than the general learning style and teaching style hypotheses. This study addresses that gap.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

M.L. van Oordt, T. van Oordt and P. du Toit

This paper aims to focus on the thinking styles of a group of Accounting students, and to determine whether team teaching by two criteria-specific lecturers can be an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the thinking styles of a group of Accounting students, and to determine whether team teaching by two criteria-specific lecturers can be an effective collaborative teaching approach to accommodate students’ diverse learning preferences. Research on thinking and learning processes led to a four-quadrant whole-brain model of people’s thinking styles and associated learning preferences. The model can be used to identify and accommodate students’ diverse thinking styles and learning preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was followed, using multiple data collection methods. The thinking styles of 288 students and two lecturers were surveyed using a thinking style questionnaire and the Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument. The results of the collaborative teaching approach were obtained by way of a survey questionnaire providing both quantitative and qualitative feedback, as well as a SWOT analysis completed by the involved lecturers.

Findings

The main results suggest that a collaborative teaching approach can address students’ diverse learning preferences, although some students may find constant switching between lecturers distracting.

Research limitations/implications

The collaborative teaching approach in the teaching interaction cannot be isolated. Collaborative teaching was not repeated or extended due to resource constraints.

Originality/value

Academics from all disciplines recognise a need for a teaching practice that addresses students’ diverse learning preferences. Hitherto, outside of special education, collaborative teaching has received little scholarly attention, especially as an approach to address tertiary students’ diverse learning preferences.

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Tine Nielsen

The purpose of this paper is to present, try out, and evaluate a strategy for implementation of learning and teaching styles at the teacher level.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present, try out, and evaluate a strategy for implementation of learning and teaching styles at the teacher level.

Design/methodology/approach

The study takes a qualitative approach to evaluating the short‐term and long‐term effects of a workshop on teaching and learning styles with regard to changing teachers' implicit beliefs and teaching practice.

Findings

Fourteen months after a two‐day workshop on learning and teaching styles, teachers' implicit beliefs about learning and teaching remain explicit and their teaching practice has changed towards a higher degree of differentiation as a result of the workshop.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates that it is possible to change experienced teachers' teaching practice to a higher degree of differentiation with a two‐day workshop.

Originality/value

The paper provides knowledge on how to change in‐service teachers' implicit beliefs and how to affect their teaching practice to making use of of learning and teaching styles in their teaching practice.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Seyyed Mohammad Reza Amirian, Saeed Ghaniabadi, Tahereh Heydarnejad and Saeed Abbasi

Following the significant role of critical thinking (CT), sense of efficacy beliefs and teaching style preferences in the success of teachers and consequently the success…

Abstract

Purpose

Following the significant role of critical thinking (CT), sense of efficacy beliefs and teaching style preferences in the success of teachers and consequently the success of the educational system, this study intended to explore their relationship and the possible influence of these three factors among English as a Foreign Language (EFL) university professors.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, Watson–Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal-Form A, Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) and Grasha's Teaching Style Inventory (TSI) were administered to 320 Iranian EFL university professors.

Findings

The data were examined via path analysis indicated that teachers' CT abilities and sense of self-efficacy beliefs significantly influenced the teaching style preferences. Moreover, it was concluded that Iranian EFL university professors' CT skills positively affect their sense of efficacy beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies may advance the possible relationships among the sub-components of CT, self-efficacy beliefs and teaching style. Furthermore, further investigations are recommended to study the influence of university professors' CT, self-efficacy beliefs and teaching style preferences in enhancing their learners' achievement.

Practical implications

The implications of the present study may contribute to the field of teacher education in providing opportunities for teachers to develop and practice higher-order thinking and self-assisted skills.

Social implications

The implications of this study may redound to the advantage of university professors, teacher educators and policy-makers.

Originality/value

This research is original. To the best of the researchers' knowledge, there has been no study investigated the possible relationships between CT, sense of efficacy beliefs and teaching style preferences in higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Arash Arianpoor and Hameed Mohsen Khayoon

This study aims to investigate the effect of teaching style and academic enthusiasm of Iraqi accounting and auditing students on their stress, aggression and anxiety.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effect of teaching style and academic enthusiasm of Iraqi accounting and auditing students on their stress, aggression and anxiety.

Design/methodology/approach

The statistical population in this study consists of two parts. The first is the Iraqi accounting and auditing students in Iran and the second is the Iraqi accounting and auditing students in Iraq. By available non-probability sampling method, 62 people (Iraqi students in Iran) and 102 (Iraqi students in Iraq) were selected as samples. In this research, a questionnaire was used to collect information. The validity of the questionnaire’s structure was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis. Also, Cronbach’s alpha coefficients in this study indicating the measurement tool’s reliability. In this research, structural equation modeling has been used to analyze and test the hypotheses. The primary criteria for determining the coefficient and evaluating the path coefficients were used to evaluate the structural model.

Findings

Findings indicate that in Iraqi students in Iraq and Iraqi students in Iran, teaching style negatively affects stress, aggression and accounting and auditing students’ anxiety. Also, in the group of Iraqi students in Iraq and the group of Iraqi students in Iran, the eagerness to study has a significant negative effect on accounting and auditing students’ stress and anxiety. In contrast, the effect of the desire to study accounting and auditing students’ aggression was confirmed only in Iraqi students in Iraq.

Originality/value

As the accounting and auditing professions are among the most stressful occupations that increase the characteristics of aggression and anxiety in the employees of that profession, the results of leading research can show that the stress, anxiety and aggression of accounting and auditing students how to reduce through training so that their stress, anxiety and aggression do not appear in the workplace and the reports of accountants and auditors are not affected.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Denise M. Jepsen, Melinda M. Varhegyi and Stephen T.T. Teo

Although learning styles and teaching quality have been studied separately, the association between the association between the two has yet to be identified. The purpose…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although learning styles and teaching quality have been studied separately, the association between the association between the two has yet to be identified. The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between students’ learning styles with students’ perceptions of teaching quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey responses from 272 undergraduate students. All 80 items in the Honey and Mumford’s (1986) Learning Styles Questionnaire and all 46 teaching quality items (Thompson, 2002) were used to assess learning styles and perceptions of teaching quality, respectively. Structural equation modelling was used to investigate the relationships between learning styles and perception of teaching quality.

Findings

Results indicate learners with dominant reflector or activist styles are influenced in their perceptions of teaching quality of their teacher or lecturer. No perceptions of teaching quality relationships were found for students with dominant theorist or pragmatist learning style.

Practical implications

Recognising that perceptions of teaching quality impacts on some students, teachers and lecturers may consider and articulate the type of learning they would prefer students to adopt for a particular class. As an example, a teacher might ask students who would normally see themselves as active learners to relax into the lecture mode of delivery and reflect on what is said in the lecture, to take time to consider what is said.

Originality/value

This study combines the two important constructs of learning and perception of teaching quality to provide insight into the relationship between the two.

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Marina Kirstein and Rolien Kunz

Individual students have different learning styles, and lecturers can no longer afford to ignore this. Lecturers have a responsibility to accommodate students’ different…

Abstract

Purpose

Individual students have different learning styles, and lecturers can no longer afford to ignore this. Lecturers have a responsibility to accommodate students’ different learning styles by including learning style flexibility in the offered learning opportunities. The purpose of this study is to map a teaching case study against the Herrmann Whole Brain® model to determine whether learning style flexibility has been incorporated in the teaching case study.

Design/methodology/approach

A teaching case study was developed and delivered as part of an undergraduate level course at a South African residential university. The case study’s primary intention was to illustrate the practical evaluation of general controls in an information technology environment. The teaching case study was analysed in terms of the Herrmann Whole Brain® model to determine whether learning style flexibility had been accommodated in the learning opportunity.

Findings

Based on an analysis of the teaching case study against the Herrmann Whole Brain® model, it is evident that the teaching case study incorporated activities that addressed all four quadrants of the Whole Brain® model. It can therefore be concluded that the learning opportunity incorporated learning style flexibility.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature in accounting education by focusing on learning style flexibility specifically using the Herrmann Whole Brain® model, as it appears that limited examples of the use of this model in accounting education have yet been published. Although this paper discusses the use of an auditing case study, the results may be of interest to lecturers in other subject areas across the academic spectrum.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2022

Chinyere Augusta Nwajiuba and Robert Ugochukwu Onyeneke

This study investigated preferred learning and teaching styles of the Z-generation learners using Nigerian universities as a case.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated preferred learning and teaching styles of the Z-generation learners using Nigerian universities as a case.

Design/methodology/approach

The visual, aural, read/write and kinesthetic (VARK) learning style model and the teaching method instrument were administered to 133 students' from private and public universities in Southeast Nigeria, and data collected were subjected to descriptive statistics and multivariate probit regression.

Findings

The students' preferred learning styles were auditory (90.2%), visual (83.5%), tactile (82.7%) and social interpersonal (73.7%). The findings indicate high preference for lecture with discussion among students while the least preferred teaching style was peer tutoring. Gender, programme of study, parents' marital status, students' socioeconomic and type of university showed different significant levels of interaction with learning style preference.

Practical implications

The results suggest that contemporary university teachers teach concepts using audio–visual media tools and lecture method combined with discussions to enhance students’ learning experiences.

Originality/value

Despite the numerous studies on learning and teaching styles preference among generations, the authors have not had until now any data examining the learning and teaching style preference of the Z-generation learner in the Nigerian context.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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