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Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

Abstract

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Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Abstract

Details

Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Adolf K. Y. Ng

This chapter reviews and analyses the contemporary development of liner shipping, port development and competition. It begins with a comprehensive review on the latest…

Abstract

This chapter reviews and analyses the contemporary development of liner shipping, port development and competition. It begins with a comprehensive review on the latest developmental trends of liner shipping and business strategies, as well as their impacts on port development and competition. Then, it discusses the responses of ports, past, present and (likely) future, in addressing these new demands and challenges. A very important point from this analysis indicates that, in the past decade, port development and competition have gradually evolved from being individual, technical efficiency-oriented to become more regional, economic efficiency-oriented. At the same time, ports have also moved out of their rather passive positions and undertaken positive steps to avert the traditionally strong bargaining power of shipping lines. This illustrates that port development and competition is a continuous morphological process which can change dramatically within a rather short period of time. This chapter provides a new perspective on port development and competition and a decent platform for further research.

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Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Ioannis N. Lagoudis

There is significant amount of literature tackling different issues related to the port industry. The present chapter focuses on a single business unit of seaports aiming at the…

Abstract

There is significant amount of literature tackling different issues related to the port industry. The present chapter focuses on a single business unit of seaports aiming at the documentation of works related to container terminals.

An effort to review, collect and present the majority of the works present in the last 30 years, between 1980 and 2010, has been made in order to picture the problems dealt and methods used by the authors in the specific research field. To facilitate the reader, studies have been grouped under five categories of addressed problems (productivity and competitiveness, yard and equipment utilization, equipment scheduling, berth planning, loading/unloading) and four modelling methodologies (mathematics and operations research, management and economics, simulation, stochastic modelling).

The analysis shows that most works focus on productivity and competitiveness issues followed by yard and equipment utilisation and equipment scheduling. In reference to the methodologies used managerial and economic approaches lead, followed by mathematics and operations research.

In reference to future research, two fields have been identified where there is scope of significant contribution by the academic community: container terminal security and container terminal supply chain integration.

The present chapter provides the framework for researchers in the field of port container terminals to picture the so far works in this research area and enables the identification of gaps at both research question and methodology level for further research.

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Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Alexandros M. Goulielmos, Venus Y. H. Lun and Kee-Hung Lai

To examine the EU ‘Short Sea Shipping’ (SSS), its ‘motorways of the sea (MoS)’ and green ports, within short sea maritime logistics.To present past research and report recent…

Abstract

To examine the EU ‘Short Sea Shipping’ (SSS), its ‘motorways of the sea (MoS)’ and green ports, within short sea maritime logistics.

To present past research and report recent developments speculating on future trends.

The dominance of SSS over road is questioned; as road transport has expanded, hubs are expected to become larger and fewer with feeders. Road transport is not certain to follow SSS and its four motorways. This result was responsible for the relocation of industry from West to East and North–East inter-port competition.

The SSS ship size and port are undefined; specific data on these concepts are unavailable.

‘Door-to-door’ services are highly sought after in this sector, but difficult to establish.

The green element introduced here, mainly for ports, will dominate future discussions because of the high importance given to climate change.

This chapter outlines for the first time the development of the policy on EU Eco-ports, the relocation of industry, the West–East port competition, the MoS and the long-term deterioration of SSS logistics which is likely to persist in the future.

Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Hilde Meersman, Eddy Van de Voorde and Thierry Vanelslander

Ports are widely recognised as crucial nodes in international trade and transport. However, for various reasons, capacity does not always match demand: sometimes there is…

Abstract

Ports are widely recognised as crucial nodes in international trade and transport. However, for various reasons, capacity does not always match demand: sometimes there is overcapacity, whereas in other cases, demand exceeds capacity and there is a shortage of the latter. This chapter therefore looks at where port congestion occurs, both globally and in the port-calling chain; it analyses actual responses by various chain actors, and it sheds some light on potential future evolution and reaction patterns.

Congestion, in general, can feature various forms of appearance: it can be more or less hidden, featuring congestion costs, or it can be visually present, featuring queues which are building up. The chapter discerns eight zones in the port-calling chain where congestion may emerge. As a result of a wide literature search, supplemented with a survey, it can first of all be observed that quite some congestion seems to occur, globally spread, and hitting larger as well as smaller ports. Most of the congestion is generated at the terminals, hinterland connection points and hinterland transport itself.

In terms of reaction patterns, one would assume that pricing throughout the system is adapted in such way that demand equals capacity. In practice, prices are hardly making any effort to make marginal revenue equal marginal cost. The reason is mainly that the power balance is quite strongly in favour of shipping companies, who impose on port and port operators the need to expand capacity at low fees. Port operators, in turn, apply various kinds of technical and procedural adaptations. The same is true for hinterland operators.

Looking towards the future, it seems that with the increase in world trade, the risk of port congestion will be even more outspoken, be it in some parts of the world more than in others. It is also very much likely that most problems will occur landside, as this is the part of the chain where solutions are least easy: who is going to take the initiative, how will co-ordination take place and where will the funding come from? Most actors seem to be aware of this trend, and seek for solutions like dedicated terminals and vertical integration or co-operation.

With the above observations, the chapter sheds some light on where the future needs and trends in the abatement of capacity will lie. It is therefore useful from a scientific point of view as well as with an eye on policy-making and operational port management.

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Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Photis M. Panayides and Dong‐Wook Song

The purpose of this paper is to define and empirically develop measures to evaluate the extent of integration of seaport container terminals in supply chains.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and empirically develop measures to evaluate the extent of integration of seaport container terminals in supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review identified four key variables hypothesized to be part of the higher‐order construct of “terminal supply chain integration (TESCI)”. The hypotheses were theoretically justified a priori and data for operationalizing the conceptualized variables obtained via a large‐scale survey of container terminal operators. A model was developed and validated using confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The validated variables of the higher‐order construct of TESCI included “information and communication systems”, “value‐added services”, “multimodal systems and operations” and “supply chain integration practices”.

Research limitations/implications

The study develops measures from the standpoint of the container terminal (the centric supply chain actor). Supply chains involve a network of companies and it would be useful to obtain data as to integration from other supply chain participants. The usual caveats of cross‐sectional research apply and longitudinal case studies may provide supplementary information.

Practical implications

There are valuable practical implications for container terminals that seek to measure the extent of integration into supply chains and for port users that place value on container TESCI in their choice and evaluation criteria.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its nature that attempts to provide a valid theoretical construct and empirical measures of seaport container TESCI. The study shifts container TESCI from an abstract concept to a theoretical construct with validated measures.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Photis M. Panayides

The marketing literature has emphasised the importance of marketing orientation as a means of achieving organisational objectives. A number of studies that have examined the…

3155

Abstract

The marketing literature has emphasised the importance of marketing orientation as a means of achieving organisational objectives. A number of studies that have examined the marketing orientation and business performance relationship have found mixed results culminating in inconclusive evidence. This paper examines the marketing practices and investigates the marketing strategy‐business performance relationship across logistics companies in the Asia‐Pacific region. The exploratory analysis suggests a positive relationship between market segmentation and performance. Differentiation and market orientation do not seem to be significantly associated with improved performance, although cross‐functional customer focus shows a significant relationship. Further discriminant analysis of the significant predictor variables suggests that two variables, viz. market segmentation and positioning, and cross‐functional customer focus are useful in differentiating between high and low performers. Managerial and further research implications for this increasingly important industry in the Asia‐Pacific region are discussed.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Jasmine Siu Lee Lam

This study aims to critically review and analyse the classification of supply chain risks and disruptions and thereby suggest a suitable method for classifying maritime risks. It…

Abstract

This study aims to critically review and analyse the classification of supply chain risks and disruptions and thereby suggest a suitable method for classifying maritime risks. It aims to discuss the propagation effects of port disruption on the supply chain and mitigation strategies.

In addition to secondary research, six semi-structured interviews were conducted with the management personnel of two terminal operators, two shipping lines and two insurance companies.

When a port disruption happens, the most immediate impact is the adverse effects on terminal operations. It also leads to a domino effect on other parties in the supply chain including shippers and consignees, shipping companies, inter-modal transport providers and other ports. Proper risk management needs to be embraced by the supply chain members. However, there is very little or no such collaboration between the supply chain members in practice.

This article proposes a more integrative approach in assessing various kinds of risks, and more research in this area to be done for Asia.

Risk management has been the concern for many stakeholders ranging from industry practitioners to the people who are affected by the maritime business throughout the world. The maritime industry should look into risk management in the maritime logistics and supply chain context instead of dealing with risk in isolation.

There is a serious lack of research for analysing supply chain disruptions with ports as a focal point. The paper contributes by filling the research gap.

Details

Maritime Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-340-8

Keywords

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