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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Peter McGill, Jill Bradshaw, Genevieve Smyth, Maria Hurman and Ashok Roy

The purpose of this paper is to outline the role played by different aspects of the social, physical and organisational environments in preventing behaviour described as…

1575

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the role played by different aspects of the social, physical and organisational environments in preventing behaviour described as challenging in people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual elaboration drawing on research and practice literature.

Findings

Community placements for people with learning disabilities should develop the characteristics of capable environments. Such characteristics are associated with prevention of challenging behaviour and improved quality of life outcomes.

Originality/value

The notion of the capable environment may help to shift the focus from the individual who displays behaviour described as challenging to the characteristics of the social, physical and organisational supports that they receive.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Justin Gagnon, Vasiliki Rahimzadeh, Cristina Longo, Peter Nugus and Gillian Bartlett

Healthcare innovation, exemplified by genomic medicine, requires increasingly sophisticated understanding of the interdisciplinary-organizational context in which new innovations…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare innovation, exemplified by genomic medicine, requires increasingly sophisticated understanding of the interdisciplinary-organizational context in which new innovations are implemented. Deliberative stakeholder consultations are public engagement tools that are gaining increasing traction in health care, as a means of maximizing the diversity of roles and interests vested in a particular policy or practice issue. They engage participants from different knowledge systems (“cultures”) in mutually respectful debate to enable group consensus on implementation strategies. Current deliberation analytic methods tend to overlook the cultural contexts of the deliberative process. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper proposes adding ethnographic participant observation to provide a more comprehensive account of the process that gives rise to deliberative outputs. To underpin this conceptual paper, the authors draw on the authors’ experience engaging healthcare professionals during implementation of genomics in the care for pediatric oncology patients with treatment-resistant glioblastoma at two tertiary care hospitals.

Findings

Ethnography enabled a deeper understanding of deliberative outcomes by combining rhetorical and non-rhetorical analysis to identify the implementation and coordination of care barriers across professional cultures.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the value of ethnographic methods in enabling a more comprehensive assessment of the quality of engagement across professional cultures in implementation studies.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Peter McGill

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Making the world a better place: achieving impact through innovation and an entrepreneurial ethos” written by John Pepin.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Making the world a better place: achieving impact through innovation and an entrepreneurial ethos” written by John Pepin.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary considers the broader role of philanthropy especially with respect to learning disability and autism.

Findings

The work of the Shirley Foundation is a good example of the contribution that can be made by philanthropy. Although philanthropy has many critics, it remains one way in which significant change can by supported.

Originality/value

Partnerships between philanthropic and government funding may help both to address some of the concerns raised about philanthropy and maximise the potential for beneficial impacts.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Peter McGill

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Andrew Jahoda’s article “Depression and people with a learning disability: a way forward”.

180

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Andrew Jahoda’s article “Depression and people with a learning disability: a way forward”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers depression and other issues of psychological well-being from the perspective of the eligibility criteria for social care in England as enshrined in the 2014 Care Act.

Findings

There is a danger of issues of psychological well-being being seen as health rather than social care needs. A more integrated perspective is required.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the importance of the role of social care provision in promoting the well-being of people with learning disabilities.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Jennifer Chase and Peter McGill

Siblings of individuals with disabilities provide the most long-term care for an individual with disabilities, yet research on their experiences is limited. A majority of previous…

Abstract

Purpose

Siblings of individuals with disabilities provide the most long-term care for an individual with disabilities, yet research on their experiences is limited. A majority of previous research focuses on young siblings from a parent’s viewpoint. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of having a sibling with a disability and behaviour described as challenging from adult siblings’ perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Six adult siblings of individuals with intellectual disabilities and behaviour described as challenging were interviewed about their responsibilities pertaining to their sibling, family relationships and the support that had been provided. The study used semi-structured interview methodology based on interview questions from previous research.

Findings

Siblings described a multifaceted impact on their lives. They attributed aspects of their career choices, personal characteristics and family dynamics to having a sibling with a disability and behaviour that challenges. Siblings stressed the inadequate support that they have received throughout their lives. They are, in a sense, the invisible carers for their sibling but they are perceived by society as just a sibling. Siblings described an optimistic perspective on their lives, even though they expressed the difficulties that they have faced.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the recruitment process and limited demographic of the participants, the findings may not be generalisable to the general population of siblings of individuals with disabilities. Further research should focus on a broader population.

Practical implications

This study reinforces the need for more support for siblings of individuals with disabilities in childhood and in adulthood.

Originality/value

This paper provides perspectives of individuals that have not been fully represented in previous research.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Gabriel Cohen and Peter McGill

Teaching skills to autistic individuals can increase independence and quality of life. However, staff supporting such individuals often lack the skills needed to teach skills…

Abstract

Purpose

Teaching skills to autistic individuals can increase independence and quality of life. However, staff supporting such individuals often lack the skills needed to teach skills. This study evaluated the use of digital videos (DVDs) to coach three care staff in teaching tooth-brushing skills to three autistic adults with co-occurring intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Personalized DVDs provided guidance on key elements of teaching new skills, including graded assistance, contingent reinforcement and environmental configuration. Participants watched their DVD six times over several days. Its impact on their teaching performances was evaluated using a multiple-baseline design. Social validity was investigated by distributing a questionnaire among the participants and family members of autistic adults.

Findings

Teaching performances improved substantially following training. The coaching method was rated positively by participants and family members.

Originality/value

Video-modelling technology can be used effectively to provide an efficient, individualized and acceptable method of coaching for care staff.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Peter McGill

234

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Serena Rose Louisa Tomlinson, Peter McGill, Nick Gore and Jessie Humphreys

Little is known about the characteristics of residential educational settings for young people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) in England. Previous research…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the characteristics of residential educational settings for young people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) in England. Previous research has focussed on the characteristics and experiences of the young people attending such settings rather than the setting itself; therefore, an overview of national provision is needed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger project, data were collected for all residential schools and colleges in England. Data relate to settings offering residential provision for at least 4 nights per week for 30 weeks per year, either at the school/college itself, or in an associated residential home. Due to the remit of the main project, settings offering placements only to young people aged under 16 were excluded. Data were collected from a range of sources, including school/college websites, Ofsted and Department for Education resources, and liaison directly with the setting.

Findings

In total, 342 residential educational settings were identified with 57 of these offering post-16 provisions only. A range of data is presented about these settings, including location, placement numbers and types available, age range catered for, special educational needs categories registered for, governance arrangements (e.g. LA maintained, privately owned, and charitable organisation), and Ofsted educational ratings.

Originality/value

These data provide a national overview of residential educational settings for young people with IDD. This enables a clearer picture of the location and type of provision offered and allows comparisons both within and between areas.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Peter McGill

386

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Peter McGill

254

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

1 – 10 of 873