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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Peter Henschel

In present times of increasing change and uncertainty, managers need a real understanding of the way that people learn. Managers must strive to support a work environment that…

Abstract

In present times of increasing change and uncertainty, managers need a real understanding of the way that people learn. Managers must strive to support a work environment that nurtures continuous learning. This article examines the principles that should help managers in their new roles and responsibilities, such as continuous learning, learning from customers, building on existing innovation, listening, observing and understanding.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Verna Allee

Intellectual capital (IC) and intangibles offer a possible pathway for reconciling our business and economic models in an environment of global interdependencies, environmental…

3453

Abstract

Intellectual capital (IC) and intangibles offer a possible pathway for reconciling our business and economic models in an environment of global interdependencies, environmental concern and larger social responsibility. However, the most common intellectual capital frameworks still operate within a traditional view of the enterprise that limits the type of business and economic analysis that might be. Realizing the larger impact of the IC and intangibles perspective requires expanding potential value domains to include: business relationships; human competence; internal structures; social citizenship; environmental health and corporate identity. An expanded view of value allows us to begin redefining value to understand knowledge and intangible benefits as currency in their own right and attend to more types of value exchange. At the macro‐economic level this new thinking allows us to more fully appreciate intangible assets such as the social fabric of a country, healthy ecosystems, and previously unseen social and economic contributions.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2021

Börje Boers and Thomas Henschel

The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand how family firms manage a crisis by applying a processual and longitudinal perspective. The objective is to find out how…

3180

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand how family firms manage a crisis by applying a processual and longitudinal perspective. The objective is to find out how crisis management is approached by family firms in Sweden, Scotland and Germany, using entrepreneurial orientation (EO) as an analytical lens. Further, this paper investigates the role of the owning family in creating and solving a crisis in family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a processual and longitudinal case study approach. Cases are drawn from Germany, Scotland and Sweden. Data collection is based on a combination of interviews with archival data such as annual reports and press clippings.

Findings

The results show that all studied firms had high levels of autonomy combined with high risk-taking. It is noteworthy, that these dimensions also help to overcome the crisis. Risk-taking and proactiveness can be useful for addressing the crisis. Under certain circumstances, even innovativeness can help to develop new offers. Autonomy is considered central in family firms and only extraordinary circumstances can be owning families make willing to compromise on it. The EO-dimensions are not all relevant at all times. Rather, family firms will emphasize the dimensions during the consecutive stages differently.

Originality/value

This study compares case companies from Germany, Scotland and Sweden and how EO contributes to their crisis management by taking a longitudinal and processual perspective. Its originality lies in the in-depth studies of companies from three countries.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Fábio Lotti Oliva, Andrei Carlos Torresani Paza, Jefferson Luiz Bution, Masaaki Kotabe, Peter Kelle, Eduardo Pinheiro Gondim de Vasconcellos, Celso Claudio de Hildebrand e Grisi, Martinho Isnard Ribeiro de Almeida and Adalberto Americo Fischmann

This study aims to investigate the risks associated with managing the dispersed knowledge in inter-organizational arrangements for innovation. Specifically, it proposes a model to…

1358

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the risks associated with managing the dispersed knowledge in inter-organizational arrangements for innovation. Specifically, it proposes a model to analyze the knowledge management risks in open innovation, applied in four steps.

Design/methodology/approach

Initially, the authors carried out a systematic literature review (SLR) on the concepts that connect knowledge management, inter-organizational arrangements for innovation and risks. The SLR results led to a complementary theoretical review on the conceptual elements in question. Based on the findings, the authors have developed a model to analyze the knowledge management risks in open innovation, which was validated by experts. It was then studied the case of GOL Airlines, a company that uses innovation to overcome the paradox between low-cost and full service in the commercial air transportation industry, considering the application and adjustment of the proposed model.

Findings

Open innovation is one of the inter-organizational arrangement types most applied in the context of innovation. Relations between agents are the primary sources of risks when managing the dispersed knowledge in these arrangements. The authors have found five main risks associated, namely, risk of the innovative effort does not reach the expected objective, risk of knowledge transfer being ineffective, risk of misappropriation of value, risk of dependency (lock-in) and risk of relations.

Practical implications

The practical implication is the proposition of a procedure for applying the model to analyze the knowledge management risks in open innovation, which makes it a prescriptive model for identifying risks. The proposed model is described in four steps, namely, to identify the agents in the environment of the value of open innovation; to identify the types of relations of each agent; to consider the barriers to knowledge management in innovation; and to assess the risks considering the possibilities derived from the agents, their relationships and the barriers. The model is applied in the GOL case and the results are presented.

Originality/value

First, it uses a novel approach to investigate open innovation while studying its risks. This approach considers the knowledge is dispersed and flows from one organization to another through a combination of relations inside the environment of value where the open innovation materializes. Second, it contributes to theory development by opening a research front that fuses four areas: risk management, knowledge management, innovation and inter-organizational arrangements. Third, this paper proposes a theoretical model and presents its operationalization. The study aims to make an impact beyond academia and uses a case study to illustrate the model application in a real and interesting open innovation project to support the business model at GOL Airlines.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Evan Ortlieb, Annalisa Susca, Jean Votypka and Earl H. Cheek

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to understand how disruptive innovations related to digital literacy can improve traditional approaches of teacher education.Approach

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to understand how disruptive innovations related to digital literacy can improve traditional approaches of teacher education.

Approach – First, the evolution of teacher education from tradition to the digital era is discussed, highlighting the evolution of various traditions, theories and models of teacher education. The authors then ask the questions, “Why do teacher education programs continue to lag in the creation of a true alignment with the current needs of modern students?” and “How can this be done and where should we begin?”

Findings – The authors believe that professional growth is the key to teacher success. Reformed teacher education programs where digital literacy is grounded in relevant contexts, collaboration, and multimodal designs will promote collective collaboration among students and teachers. Digital literacies curriculum should draw on multimodalities and position students as producers of knowledge for a public audience. These disruptive forces function to improve traditional notions of teacher education, providing a catalyst to the democratization of knowledge for teacher development.

Practical Implications – Collaboration across digital platforms promotes learning through crowd-accelerated learning, rhizomatic learning, citizen inquiry, massive open social learning, maker cultures, and blockchain platforms. These approaches can foster genuine and relevant learning in teacher education programs, modernizing and matching instructional techniques with the teacher preparation demands of today and tomorrow.

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Martin R.W. Hiebl, Christine Duller and Herbert Neubauer

Family firms are the most prevalent type of firm worldwide. Nevertheless, the existent enterprise risk management (ERM) literature is silent on the adoption of ERM in family…

1284

Abstract

Purpose

Family firms are the most prevalent type of firm worldwide. Nevertheless, the existent enterprise risk management (ERM) literature is silent on the adoption of ERM in family firms. Family firms exhibit specifics likely to influence the adoption of ERM. Most importantly, they often feature lower levels of agency conflicts, which should make them less prone to invest in mechanisms to control such problems. Consequently, it is expected that family firms are less prone to invest in ERM. This paper aims to explore this basic expectation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a survey of 430 firms from Austria and Germany.

Findings

It is observed that family firms show a lower adoption of ERM, especially in family firms where there is a family CEO.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that future empirical ERM research should more closely analyze or at least control for family influence.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to analyze ERM adoption in family firms.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1970

Klaus Peters

THE German aerospace industry faces the new decade with optimism. Even the budget restrictions announced recently which affect most parts of the industry cannot lessen that…

Abstract

THE German aerospace industry faces the new decade with optimism. Even the budget restrictions announced recently which affect most parts of the industry cannot lessen that impression. Some of the money not granted has only been frozen to avoid further overheating of the economy. In comparison with the aerospace industries of Great Britain — employing 240,000 people — and France — employing 100,000 people — the German aerospace industry with its 52,000 employees seems to be of less importance. This figure, however, is remarkable with regard to the fact that in 1956 this industry had to start from nothing. The airframe industry employs about 32,500, the space industry some 2,600, the engine industry about 6,200, the material and accessory industry 3,000 employees, and in the equipment industry another 7,200 people are working directly for the aerospace industry.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1939

A hull spray reducing construction comprising a plurality of steps placed along the outer under edges of the bottom of the hull, said steps each being in the form of a tetrahedron…

Abstract

A hull spray reducing construction comprising a plurality of steps placed along the outer under edges of the bottom of the hull, said steps each being in the form of a tetrahedron having its apex forward of its base and having its base side coinciding with the chine of the hull.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 11 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Markus Schwaninger

This study aims to explore an exemplar of the design and application of a systemic framework for higher education. The field of application is in the social sciences and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore an exemplar of the design and application of a systemic framework for higher education. The field of application is in the social sciences and the perspective long-term, covering three generations of faculty and many generations of students.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is exploratory. It contains a conceptual component and an empirical component with a long-term case study from a European university.

Findings

A cybersystemic approach to higher education has been shown, at the focal university, to be a powerful amplifier of individual and institutional capabilities, and it still has great potential. The crucial prerequisite is that the approach is virtuously designed and implemented.

Originality/value

A case study ranging over 50 years is presented. The respective university has been a role model for other educational institutions for many years. Its influence in the German-speaking countries, and more recently also internationally, has become significant.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1940

Claim The trailing edge of the main wing is composed of a flap 4 movable around an axis 3. A lever 5 is rigidly connected with the flap. A crosshead engaged in a slotted guide…

Abstract

Claim The trailing edge of the main wing is composed of a flap 4 movable around an axis 3. A lever 5 is rigidly connected with the flap. A crosshead engaged in a slotted guide member 7. If this is moved in the direction of the arrow P from the cockpit, the position of the crosshead running in an inclined groove or a slot is altered. The result of this is that the lever 5 rotates around 3 and thus displaces the flap 4.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 12 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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