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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2008

William W. Cooper and Piyu Yue

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Challenges of the Muslim World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53243-5

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Challenges of the Muslim World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53243-5

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Ali Asghar Pourezzat, Mostafa Nejati, Ghazaleh Taheri Attar and Seyed Mahdi Sharifmousavi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the economy of Persian Gulf countries following a post‐oil economy. This is accompanied with a futurology study and planning of

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1203

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the economy of Persian Gulf countries following a post‐oil economy. This is accompanied with a futurology study and planning of certain scenarios that can be applied to these countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a futurology approach by investigating various scenarios to explore the Arab economy after oil. As such, a series of possible policies are proposed that can be undertaken by Arab countries depending on their public policy. Each of the suggested policies involves different scenarios that have been formed and analyzed using an era‐based cellular planning system.

Findings

The findings propose three main policies to be undertaken by Arab countries including: investing the oil income in miscellaneous economic baskets in order to minimize the vulnerability and maximize the profits; reducing the oil production in the coming years and transforming the one‐product oil economy to a value added petrochemical economy; and seeking new sources of income and wealth. In addition, findings emphasize the necessity for using renewable and lasting wealth resources and minimizing the dependency of countries on the oil economy.

Originality/value

The proposed scenarios in the study can act as strategic constructs in strengthening the scenario sets in the consecutive years and help develop other scenarios in the future. As such, this paper would be of interest to governmental advisors, strategic planners and policy‐makers involved in studies related to the Middle East.

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Kushani Ishara Athapaththu and Gayani Karunasena

Sustainability in construction is a challenging task for contractors due to diminishing natural resources and increasing energy costs. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability in construction is a challenging task for contractors due to diminishing natural resources and increasing energy costs. The purpose of this paper is to identify key issues that affect the adaptation of sustainable construction practices by Sri Lankan contracting organisations and propose a framework for successful adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight semi-structured interviews are conducted from three selected case studies to gather data on sustainable construction practices and related issues in contracting organisations in Sri Lanka. The proposed framework is validated and enhanced by interviews conducted with seven industry experts in Sri Lanka and the Persian Gulf region. A cross-case with code-based content analysis is used to analyse the data.

Findings

Gaps in the legal framework and weak enforcement of prevailing rules, less institutional intervention, less commitment of people especially key stakeholders, wrong perceptions on capital costs, and low levels of education and experience on sustainable construction are identified as key issues, similar to the Persian Gulf region. The proposed framework presents suggestions for successful adaptation of sustainable construction practices in the following eight key areas: legal framework, standards, guidelines or policies, design, procurement, technology, processes and innovations, people and organisational structure, education and training, and measurements and reporting.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this research is limited to the data gathered from C1 category construction contractors in Sri Lanka and similar category in the United Arab Emirates of the Persian Gulf region.

Originality/value

The framework for the enhancement of sustainable construction practices via contracting organisations is proposed as an inaugural step to establishing a country-based and industry-specific model to achieve sustainability in the Sri Lankan construction industry.

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Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Allan Metz

On 1 April 1978, the Israeli peace movement burst into world consciousness when an estimated 25,000 Israelis demonstrated in Tel Aviv to urge the administration of Prime…

Abstract

On 1 April 1978, the Israeli peace movement burst into world consciousness when an estimated 25,000 Israelis demonstrated in Tel Aviv to urge the administration of Prime Minister Menachem Begin to continue peace negotiations with Egypt. A grassroots group called Peace Now is credited with organizing and leading that demonstration. Today, the “peace camp” refers to left‐wing political parties and organizations that hold dovish positions on the Arab‐Israeli conflict and the Palestinian issue. While some figures in the Labor Party view themselves as the peace movement's natural leader, political parties further to the left like the Citizens Rights Movement (CRM) and Mapam are more dovish. In the last 10 years, many grassroots peace organizations have, like Peace Now, formed outside the political party system, with the goal of influencing public opinion and eventually having an impact on policy makers. Peace Now is still the largest, most visible and influential of those organizations.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Challenges of the Muslim World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53243-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Magda El‐Sherbini

The conflict between Iran and Iraq is not new; it dates from long before September 1980. In fact, the origins of the current war can be traced to the battle of Qadisiyah…

Abstract

The conflict between Iran and Iraq is not new; it dates from long before September 1980. In fact, the origins of the current war can be traced to the battle of Qadisiyah in Southern Iraq in 637 A.D., a battle in which the Arab armies of General Sa'd ibn Abi Waqqas decisively defeated the Persian army. In victory, the Arab armies extended Islam east of the Zagros Mountains to Iran. In defeat, the Persian Empire began a steady decline that lasted until the sixteenth century. However, since the beginning of that century, Persia has occupied Iraq three times: 1508–1514, 1529–1543, and 1623–1638. Boundary disputes, specifically over the Shatt al‐Arab Waterway, and old enmities caused the wars. In 1735, belligerent Iranian naval forces entered the Shatt al‐Arab but subsequently withdrew. Twenty years later, Iranians occupied the city of Sulimaniah and threatened to occupy the neighboring countries of Bahrain and Kuwait. In 1847, Iran dominated the eastern bank of the Shatt al‐Arab and occupied Mohamarah in Iraq.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

M. Kavoossi

Competition in the international arena is increasing at a rapid rate and has become a given in the business plans of most Middle Eastern corporations and is an…

Abstract

Competition in the international arena is increasing at a rapid rate and has become a given in the business plans of most Middle Eastern corporations and is an increasingly important factor in the planning most other in the developing world. Many regions are not only marketing themselves, but are working to solve infrastructure problems and are building their local executives' capabilities to trade internationally. At present, however, the Gulf states are doing very little on a cohesive region‐wide basis. To be competitive, the Middle East region must embark on a plan of action. This article contains recommendations which will significantly improve the region's image, visibility, international business base, and international infrastructure.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Book part
Publication date: 17 August 2011

Riad A. Attar

In this chapter, I explain the key trends in defense spending and arms procurement in the Middle East and test whether those trends were subject to Louis F. Richardson's…

Abstract

In this chapter, I explain the key trends in defense spending and arms procurement in the Middle East and test whether those trends were subject to Louis F. Richardson's action-reaction model. I assessed the “guns-versus-butter” trade-off and the future prospects for peace in the region in light of these trends. I explained the danger of transferring weapons knowledge and technology to non-state actors in the Middle East. I investigate the trend in defense spending based on Richardson's action-reaction model by considering rival pairs in each subregion: Algeria–Morocco in North Africa; Egypt–Israel, Jordan–Israel, and Syria–Israel in the frontline states; United Arab Emirates–Iran in the Arab–Persian Gulf; and Pakistan–India in the Indian subcontinent. I used ordinary least squares (OLS) method in testing those dyads. I used military expenditure data from the SIPRI Yearbook: World Armament and Disarmament published annually by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. I conclude the study with policy implications and recommendations for achieving permanent peace in the region.

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Governance, Development and Conflict
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-896-1

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Malcolm Foley, David McGillivray and Gayle McPherson

The paper aims to give an interesting insight into the rise in event bidding and delivery of sports mega‐events from Qatar and the Middle East. This paper seeks to examine…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to give an interesting insight into the rise in event bidding and delivery of sports mega‐events from Qatar and the Middle East. This paper seeks to examine the shift in government policies and citizen relationships in the Middle East and Gulf Region, focusing on the specific case of Qatar from its staging of the 15th Asian Games in 2006 to present.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with an overview of the main literature on the importance of sport events as a vehicle for securing global profile for cities and nations. The paper draws upon the authors' participation at the 15th Asian Games and interviews conducted there and latterly, desk‐based research involving scrutiny of Qatar's recent policy pronouncements and published materials pertaining to sporting events in the intervening period since the 2006 Games.

Findings

The findings are presented in the form of a case study, using the Asian Games as a starting point and finishing with Qatar's latest bids for sporting mega‐events. The paper presents a conceptual analysis of the situation in Doha and reveals a ten‐year strategy from Qatar to set itself apart from its neighbors in bidding to host mega‐sporting events and in its progress in terms of civil rights for women. This has allowed wider participation in sport and ensured Qatar can bid for the most prestigious global sporting events.

Research limitations/implications

This paper adds to the wider public policy discussion and contributes to the body of knowledge in this area. The authors have written extensively on events policy but believe issues of democracy versus ruling states, emotional bidding and awarding to such states will continue to rise over the coming years and these have significant implications for both event owners in awarding such bids but also for policy makers in legitimizing bidding for such events in this context.

Originality/value

The paper reveals that the currency of awarding events to countries in the Middle East, Africa and South America is politically and socially important and of major interest to both the public and academics at present.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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