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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Eun Young Nae, Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the boundary conditions in the relationship between feedback-seeking behavior (FSB) and work performance. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the boundary conditions in the relationship between feedback-seeking behavior (FSB) and work performance. The authors hypothesized that the positive influence of employees’ FSB on their work performance is influenced by perceived quality of feedback. The authors also expected that employees’ trust in their supervisors moderated the interaction between their FSB and perceived feedback quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 202 employees in South Korea. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The results showed that while employees’ FSB was positively related to work performance, the influence was stronger for employees who perceived they were receiving high quality of feedback from supervisors. The authors also found that the moderating effect of feedback quality on the relationship between FSB and work performance was stronger when employees had high levels of trust in their supervisors.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that if managers wish to encourage employees to achieve work goal and desirable performance levels by actively engaging in FSB, they should pay more attention to providing high quality of feedback and building trust with employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to expand the understanding of FSB-work performance relationship by verifying the boundary conditions, which suggests the importance of examining the moderating factors in the FSB mechanism.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Regina H. Mulder and Andrea D. Ellinger

The purpose of this paper is to overview the state of research on feedback and aspects of feedback that have been under-researched in the scholarly literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to overview the state of research on feedback and aspects of feedback that have been under-researched in the scholarly literature, particularly involving the theme of quality of the feedback. The paper seeks to draw on the existing literature, to develop a conceptual framework that identifies important aspects associated with quality of feedback that the articles in this special issue uniquely address.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual article that presents the results of an analysis of the feedback research literature and offers an abbreviated overview of it. It also develops a conceptual model that illustrates the complexity of the feedback process and identifies gaps that exist in the literature which the contributions of this special issue address.

Findings

The provision of feedback is critical to individuals ' learning and performance improvement in the context of their work. Coupled with the provision of feedback is the importance and need for high quality feedback. The quality of feedback and factors that influence it are the central themes of this issue.

Originality/value

This paper introduces this special issue on “Perceptions of quality of feedback in organizations: characteristics, determinants, outcomes of feedback, and possibilities for improvement” by overviewing the concepts associated with feedback and feedback seeking and developing a conceptual model that highlights the complexity of the feedback process. It also identifies existing gaps in the knowledge base that the contributions within this special issue address.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Regina H. Mulder

The purpose of this paper is to increase insight in the mechanisms of feedback processes by investigating what kind of feedback characteristics lead to what specific kind…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase insight in the mechanisms of feedback processes by investigating what kind of feedback characteristics lead to what specific kind of informal learning activities (ILAs).

Design/methodology/approach

The 31 persons participated were recruited by the snowball method, and work in education, healthcare or profit sector. They filled out a learning log. The respondents wrote down feedback incidents that occurred and the ILA they carried out in response. A total of 367 feedback incidents led to 913 ILA. Quantitative analyses such as correlations and regression analyses are conducted.

Findings

Feedback led to ILA, especially to reflection, and communication with colleagues. There is no pattern found in the relation between outcomes. Timing aspects seem irrelevant for ILA. Feedback consisting of discussing possibilities for personal improvement leads to ILA. Precise, positive and helpful feedback leads to ILA.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the aim and design of the study, the outcomes are not generalizable and individual characteristics (e.g. motivation, attitude) were not measured. A few ILA are mentioned only a few times.

Practical implications

Feedback that consists of discussing possibilities for personal improvement can be used to increase ILA. Feedback can be used to increase reflection and communication at work. Creating a work culture that fosters learning from feedback is important. The quality of feedback providing competences is important.

Originality/value

This paper gives in-depth insight into the relation between specific characteristics of feedback and the ILA. It also assesses to what ILA a specific feedback incident (directly) leads.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Janine van der Rijt, Piet Van den Bossche and Mien S.R. Segers

– The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a social network perspective by using an ego-centric network survey to investigate employees ' feedback seeking behaviour within their professional networks. Data were collected from an online questionnaire among 243 employees working in a large multinational organization located in The Netherlands.

Findings

Results indicate that employees frequently seek feedback from colleagues within the same department. However, managers or leaders seek significantly less feedback from colleagues in the same department and from coaches, as compared to others. Furthermore, employees perceive the feedback they receive from managers/leaders, coaches, and colleagues in the same department as useful.

Originality/value

The study findings extend the existing literature on the dynamics of feedback seeking of employees across different hierarchical levels. Methodologically, an egocentric network survey was used to investigate the employees ' relationships within their professional network. The findings suggest that this approach, novel in research on feedback seeking, is valuable and promising.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Filip Lievens

To diffuse new management fads or to promote existing management practices slogans are often used. In this study eight slogans regarding assessment centres were retrieved…

Abstract

To diffuse new management fads or to promote existing management practices slogans are often used. In this study eight slogans regarding assessment centres were retrieved from brochures of consultancy agencies and were compared to empirical research. These slogans were that assessment centres work, are expensive, fair, have a potent influence on candidates, provide insight into candidates’ personality, and are not prone to trainability effects. Other slogans include that trained assessors speak the same language and that candidate reactions are positive. Resulting from this comparison a more fine‐grained picture of the strengths and weaknesses of assessment centres emerges. In particular, it is demonstrated that the accuracy of the slogans often depends on design factors. It is suggested that future studies combine multiple research perspectives, examine assessment centre process issues, and validate new assessment centre applications.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Ahmad Aljarah and Majed Alrawashdeh

Prior studies have not yet made sufficient effort to examine the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and customer citizenship behavior (CCB) in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior studies have not yet made sufficient effort to examine the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and customer citizenship behavior (CCB) in the hospitality context. The purpose of this study is to explore the role of CSR in fostering CCB in the hospitality context, as well as the mechanisms underlying the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study obtained its empirical evidence from 422 hotel customers in North Cyprus and applied a structural equation modeling analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that CSR significantly contributes to customer help, customer feedback and customer tolerance. Surprisingly, the results do not support the existence of a significant relationship between CSR and customer advocacy. Evidence indicates that perceived service quality plays a partial mediating role.

Practical implications

This study has shown that customers are rewarding firms involved in CSR initiatives in the form of CCB – directly and indirectly – through perceived service quality. This finding can advance managers’ understanding, enabling them to better manage their CSR initiatives to achieve the most effective outcomes.

Originality/value

The study advances a convergence between the research streams of CSR and CCB, which has been under-explored in the tourism context. The study also extends the CSR and customer citizenship literature through a novel mediation mechanism of perceived service quality.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Avinandan Mukherjee and Neeru Malhotra

Role clarity of frontline staff is critical to their perceptions of service quality in call centres. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of role clarity…

Abstract

Purpose

Role clarity of frontline staff is critical to their perceptions of service quality in call centres. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of role clarity and its antecedents and consequences on employee‐perceived service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model, based on the job characteristics model and cognitive theories, is proposed. Key antecedents of role clarity considered here are feedback, autonomy, participation, supervisory consideration, and team support; while key consequences are organizational commitment, job satisfaction and service quality. An internal marketing approach is adopted and all variables are measured from the frontline employee's perspective. A structural equation model is developed and tested on a sample of 342 call centre representatives of a major commercial bank in the UK.

Findings

The research reveals that role clarity plays a critical role in explaining employee perceptions of service quality. Further, the research findings indicate that feedback, participation and team support significantly influence role clarity, which in turn influences job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The research suggests that boundary personnel in service firms should strive for more clarity in perceived role for delivering better service quality. The limitations are in sample availability from in‐house transaction call centres of a single bank.

Originality/value

The contributions of this study are untangling the confusing research evidence on the effect of role clarity on service quality, using service quality as a performance variable as opposed to productivity estimates, adopting an internal marketing approach to understanding the phenomenon, and introducing teamwork along with job‐design and supervisory factors as antecedent to role clarity.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Lisa A. Steelman and Kelly A. Rutkowski

Previous research indicates that unfavorable feedback, even unfavorable feedback provided for developmental purposes only, is not perceived as useful, results in negative…

Abstract

Previous research indicates that unfavorable feedback, even unfavorable feedback provided for developmental purposes only, is not perceived as useful, results in negative reactions and is not associated with a recipient's willingness to change his or her behavior. This study examined the extent to which contextual variables mitigate these unwanted effects of developmental unfavorable feedback. Results indicate that employees are more motivated to improve their job performance based on unfavorable feedback when the feedback source is perceived to be credible, the feedback is of high quality and the feedback is delivered in a considerate manner.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Mayuri Duggirala, Chandrasekharan Rajendran and R.N. Anantharaman

This research paper aims to identify dimensions of patient‐perceived total quality service (TQS) in the healthcare sector. Further, the impact of the dimensions of patient…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to identify dimensions of patient‐perceived total quality service (TQS) in the healthcare sector. Further, the impact of the dimensions of patient‐perceived TQS on patient satisfaction is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire has been developed based on an extensive literature review of research in service quality and based on responses of the pilot survey among patients recently discharged from hospital. The instrument thus developed has been examined for its psychometric properties using tests of reliability and validity. Multiple regression analysis has been used to examine the impact of the dimensions of patient‐perceived quality on patient satisfaction.

Findings

Findings highlight seven distinct dimensions of patient‐perceived TQS and the relationships among them. Positive and significant relationships among the dimensions and patient satisfaction have been found.

Research limitations/implications

Contribution to research on healthcare services by the development of a comprehensive instrument of patient‐perceived healthcare quality.

Practical implications

This instrument would enable patients to provide feedback to hospitals regarding the quality of healthcare received by them. Hospitals could use this feedback to analyze their performance, gauge patient satisfaction and benchmark their performance against competitive hospitals.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates a comprehensive instrument of patient‐perceived healthcare quality.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Michael Preece

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge…

Abstract

This research explores perceptions of knowledge management processes held by managers and employees in a service industry. To date, empirical research on knowledge management in the service industry is sparse. This research seeks to examine absorptive capacity and its four capabilities of acquisition, assimilation, transformation and exploitation and their impact on effective knowledge management. All of these capabilities are strategies that enable external knowledge to be recognized, imported and integrated into, and further developed within the organization effectively. The research tests the relationships between absorptive capacity and effective knowledge management through analysis of quantitative data (n = 549) drawn from managers and employees in 35 residential aged care organizations in Western Australia. Responses were analysed using Partial Least Square-based Structural Equation Modelling. Additional analysis was conducted to assess if the job role (of manager or employee) and three industry context variables of profit motive, size of business and length of time the organization has been in business, impacted on the hypothesized relationships.

Structural model analysis examines the relationships between variables as hypothesized in the research framework. Analysis found that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities correlated significantly with effective knowledge management, with absorptive capacity explaining 56% of the total variability for effective knowledge management. Findings from this research also show that absorptive capacity and the four capabilities provide a useful framework for examining knowledge management in the service industry. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the perceptions held between managers and employees, nor between respondents in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Furthermore, the size of the organization and length of time the organization has been in business did not impact on absorptive capacity, the four capabilities and effective knowledge management.

The research considers implications for business in light of these findings. The role of managers in providing leadership across the knowledge management process was confirmed, as well as the importance of guiding routines and knowledge sharing throughout the organization. Further, the results indicate that within the participating organizations there are discernible differences in the way that some organizations manage their knowledge, compared to others. To achieve effective knowledge management, managers need to provide a supportive workplace culture, facilitate strong employee relationships, encourage employees to seek out new knowledge, continually engage in two-way communication with employees and provide up-to-date policies and procedures that guide employees in doing their work. The implementation of knowledge management strategies has also been shown in this research to enhance the delivery and quality of residential aged care.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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