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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

E. Kevin Kelloway, Julian Barling and Jane Helleur

Investigated the effect of leadership training and counseling feedback on subordinates’ perceptions of transformational leadership. A total of 40 organizational leaders…

Abstract

Investigated the effect of leadership training and counseling feedback on subordinates’ perceptions of transformational leadership. A total of 40 organizational leaders participated in a 2 (training) × 2 (feedback) design. Data from 180 subordinates showed that both training and feedback resulted in increased subordinate perceptions of leaders’ transformational leadership. Results suggest that both training and feedback are effective means of changing leadership behaviors but that the combination of training and feedback did not result in enhanced transformational leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Shane Connelly and Brett S. Torrence

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span…

Abstract

Organizational behavior scholars have long recognized the importance of a variety of emotion-related phenomena in everyday work life. Indeed, after three decades, the span of research on emotions in the workplace encompasses a wide variety of affective variables such as emotional climate, emotional labor, emotion regulation, positive and negative affect, empathy, and more recently, specific emotions. Emotions operate in complex ways across multiple levels of analysis (i.e., within-person, between-person, interpersonal, group, and organizational) to exert influence on work behavior and outcomes, but their linkages to human resource management (HRM) policies and practices have not always been explicit or well understood. This chapter offers a review and integration of the bourgeoning research on discrete positive and negative emotions, offering insights about why these emotions are relevant to HRM policies and practices. We review some of the dominant theories that have emerged out of functionalist perspectives on emotions, connecting these to a strategic HRM framework. We then define and describe four discrete positive and negative emotions (fear, pride, guilt, and interest) highlighting how they relate to five HRM practices: (1) selection, (2) training/learning, (3) performance management, (4) incentives/rewards, and (5) employee voice. Following this, we discuss the emotion perception and regulation implications of these and other discrete emotions for leaders and HRM managers. We conclude with some challenges associated with understanding discrete emotions in organizations as well as some opportunities and future directions for improving our appreciation and understanding of the role of discrete emotional experiences in HRM.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-322-3

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Tamar Tas, Thoni Houtveen and Wim Van de Grift

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, what progress student teachers make during one academic year, while being trained in a professional learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question, what progress student teachers make during one academic year, while being trained in a professional learning community, using objective classroom observation, using lesson preparation templates that match their developmental stage and stage-focused mentor feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

The teaching skills of the student teachers (n=101) were measured at the start and at the end of the academic year. For the measurements, the standardized and psychometrically tested International Comparative Analysis of Learning and Teaching observation instrument is used.

Findings

The student teachers achieved a small growth on the basic teaching skills and a medium growth on two of the three advanced skills for teachers.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the lack of a control group, causal conclusions cannot be made. This research provides knowledge on the actual observed level of teaching skills of student teachers trained in a close collaborating professional learning community.

Originality/value

Little is known about the actual growth of observable teaching skills of student teachers in elementary education. Teacher training colleges and internship schools in the Netherlands are in search of better ways to collaborate more closely in order to improve the quality of teaching of their student teachers. These findings can inspire teacher training communities to improve their own teaching quality and the teaching quality of their student teachers.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Marjoleine J. Dobbelaer, Frans J. Prins and Dré van Dongen

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether oral feedback by inspectors of the Dutch Inspectorate of Education is an adequate method to support the professional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether oral feedback by inspectors of the Dutch Inspectorate of Education is an adequate method to support the professional development of teachers in primary education. This study aims to examine the impact of short feedback training for inspectors (focused on effective feedback conversations) on feedback quality and on teachers ' feedback perception. In addition, it aims to study the relation between immediate perception and the delayed perception of that feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

In an independent sample experimental design, 15 inspectors provided feedback to 40 teachers in primary education. Nine inspectors received short feedback training (the experimental group), while six others did not receive this training (the control group).

Findings

The results indicate that feedback provided by trained inspectors can foster professional development of teachers in primary education and that short feedback training has added value. The quality of the feedback by inspectors was related to teachers ' immediate perception of the feedback and the delayed perception of the feedback.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is the small group of inspectors and the limited number of feedback conversations they could provide. Further research could be aimed at examining the impact of feedback of trained inspectors on the professional development of underperforming teachers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research that examines effective ways to use feedback conversations in workplace settings for the professional development of teachers.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1988

Barry Smith

The basic information required by trainers who wish to use video to achieve training outcomes is presented for those who are not experts at video production, do not have…

Abstract

The basic information required by trainers who wish to use video to achieve training outcomes is presented for those who are not experts at video production, do not have the time or the interest to become expert, do not have, and do not wish to develop, expertise in electronics and do not have access to sufficient organisational resources to hire an expert. The essential information needed to make experiences with video as productive, creative and problem‐free as possible is included.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Patricia S. Rubí González, Luis De la Barra Vivallos, Hardy Schaefer and Pablo Vergara-Barra

Feedback is a tool that informs students about their learning process and facilitates necessary changes. It looks for the students’ own perceptions of their performance…

Abstract

Purpose

Feedback is a tool that informs students about their learning process and facilitates necessary changes. It looks for the students’ own perceptions of their performance and how to improve it, developing permanent learning skills vital for autonomous practice. It is useful for improving one’s performance, clinical skills, communication and treatment of patients. If carried out improperly, it causes a lack of motivation and a collapse in the teacher–student relationship. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the perceptions and experiences of the residents and graduates of the psychiatry specialty at the Universidad of Concepción with respect to the feedback received on their performance during their training.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted using a qualitative approach of an exploratory, descriptive and interpretative nature that was also based on Grounded Theory. Ten in-depth voluntary interviews were conducted with residents-in-training and graduates from within the last two years of the Adult Psychiatry specialty at the Universidad of Concepción. Subsequently, the data were codified to create a theoretical model.

Findings

The interpersonal teacher–resident relationship, when based on collaboration and an openness to dialogue, is fundamental in producing effective feedback.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study were based mainly on the qualitative methodology used, so it is not possible to generalize the results. Although the above limitation, this study seems to reaffirm the importance of feedback for residents in training, so it would be advisable to reproduce it in various training contexts and extend it to the perception of the teachers involved. On the other hand, to follow this research line, it is essential to create instruments that facilitate the use of quantitative research methodology, which allows the generalization and comparison of results in different areas.

Social implications

This research opens a first line of research regarding subjective experience when receiving feedback, which will allow the creation of instruments to objectify how it is being developed in different educational contexts and to propose strategies to standardize its realization.

Originality/value

There are no other studies of this type published. The originality of this research was that beyond the mention made about the known characteristics that a feedback must have to be effective, the participants gave special emphasis to the fact that it is a social relationship, which should be based on a horizontal interaction between two actors, in addition to promoting dialogue and mutual involvement in the task that brings them together. Thus it is an effective teaching strategy, fulfilling the objective of motivating the learning and autonomy of the resident.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Eva Davidsson and Martin Stigmar

Previous research has pointed to a lack of studies concerning supervision training courses. Consequently, the literature has little to suggest, and the research field is…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has pointed to a lack of studies concerning supervision training courses. Consequently, the literature has little to suggest, and the research field is underexplored, so questions around the content and design of supervision training courses remain unanswered and need to be addressed systematically. The main aim of the present study is to explore and map whether shared content and design exist in supervisor training courses across different vocations.

Design/methodology/approach

A syllabus analysis is used in order to investigate characteristic features in supervisor training courses related to the professions of dentist, doctor, psychologist, police officer and teacher.

Findings

The results point to the existence of shared content in the different courses, such as an emphasis on learning and supervision theories, feedback, ethics, assessment and communication. Furthermore, the results conclude similarities in design of the courses, such as a problem-based approach, seminars, lectures and homework. Thus, there are common theoretical approaches to important supervisory competences.

Practical implications

Our results intend to offer possibilities to learn from different professions when improving supervisor training courses but may also constitute a starting point for developing a shared model of interprofessional supervisor competences. Furthermore, the results may support possible cooperation in interprofessional courses. This could include arranging interprofessional courses, where one part is shared for participants from the included professions and another part is profession-specific.

Originality/value

We seek to contribute to the research field of supervision at workplaces with knowledge and ideas about how to learn from different professions when developing and improving supervisor training courses.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Idris Jeelani, Kevin Han and Alex Albert

Workers and construction professionals are generally not proficient in recognizing and managing safety hazards. Although valuable, traditional training experiences have…

Abstract

Purpose

Workers and construction professionals are generally not proficient in recognizing and managing safety hazards. Although valuable, traditional training experiences have not sufficiently addressed the issue of poor hazard recognition and management in construction. Since hazard recognition and management are cognitive skills that depend on attention, visual examination and decision-making, performance assessment and feedback in an environment that is realistic and representative of actual working conditions are important. The purpose of this paper is to propose a personalized safety training protocol that is delivered using robust, realistic and immersive environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of virtual environments were developed: (1) Stereo-panoramic environments using real construction scenes that were used to evaluate the performance of trainees accurately and (2) A virtual construction site, which was used to deliver various elements of instructional training. A training protocol was then designed that was aimed at improving the hazard recognition and management performance of trainees. It was delivered using the developed virtual environments. The effectiveness of the training protocol was experimentally tested with 53 participants using a before–after study.

Findings

The results present a 39% improvement in hazard recognition and a 44% improvement in hazard management performance.

Originality/value

This study combines the benefits of using a virtual environment for providing instructional training along with realistic environments (stereo-panoramic scenes) for performance assessment and feedback. The training protocol includes several new and innovative training elements that are designed to improve the hazard recognition and hazard management abilities of the trainees. Moreover, the effectiveness of training in improving hazard recognition and hazard management is measured using specific outcome variables.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Paul F. Buller and Glenn M. McEvoy

This study examined the effects ofbehaviour modelling training (BMT) onfour measures of training effectivenesstwo years after the training. Theresults suggested that BMT…

Abstract

This study examined the effects of behaviour modelling training (BMT) on four measures of training effectiveness two years after the training. The results suggested that BMT had positive effects on trainee reactions and on subjective measures of behavioural change and organisational performance. Positive training outcomes were associated with the degree of congruence between the BMT skills and organisational norms, specific goals and feedback, and external support for the BMT programme.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Regina H. Mulder and Andrea D. Ellinger

The purpose of this paper is to overview the state of research on feedback and aspects of feedback that have been under-researched in the scholarly literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to overview the state of research on feedback and aspects of feedback that have been under-researched in the scholarly literature, particularly involving the theme of quality of the feedback. The paper seeks to draw on the existing literature, to develop a conceptual framework that identifies important aspects associated with quality of feedback that the articles in this special issue uniquely address.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual article that presents the results of an analysis of the feedback research literature and offers an abbreviated overview of it. It also develops a conceptual model that illustrates the complexity of the feedback process and identifies gaps that exist in the literature which the contributions of this special issue address.

Findings

The provision of feedback is critical to individuals ' learning and performance improvement in the context of their work. Coupled with the provision of feedback is the importance and need for high quality feedback. The quality of feedback and factors that influence it are the central themes of this issue.

Originality/value

This paper introduces this special issue on “Perceptions of quality of feedback in organizations: characteristics, determinants, outcomes of feedback, and possibilities for improvement” by overviewing the concepts associated with feedback and feedback seeking and developing a conceptual model that highlights the complexity of the feedback process. It also identifies existing gaps in the knowledge base that the contributions within this special issue address.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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