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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Sarah De Meulenaer, Nathalie Dens and Patrick De Pelsmacker

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the globalization (vs localization) of different cues (advertising copy, brand name, spokesperson, brand logo) influences…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the globalization (vs localization) of different cues (advertising copy, brand name, spokesperson, brand logo) influences consumers’ perceived brand globalness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted conjoint analyses for two products differing in product category involvement (chocolates vs computer) with 200 consumers from the Netherlands. Additionally, based on cluster analysis, the authors divide respondents into two groups: local vs global consumer culture individuals, and the authors compare the results of the conjoint analysis for these two clusters.

Findings

Advertising copy is most important in determining perceived brand globalness. The spokesperson and the brand logo determine perceived brand globalness more strongly for a low-involvement product, whereas the brand name is more important for a high-involvement product. Further, the spokesperson and the brand logo are relatively more important for global consumer culture individuals, while local consumer culture individuals find the brand name and advertising copy relatively more important.

Practical implications

The most important cue to position a brand as global is the advertising copy. Brand managers of a low-involvement product and/or targeting global-minded consumers should concentrate on the spokesperson and the brand logo to position their brand. Managers of a high-involvement product and/or targeting local-minded people should focus on the brand name.

Originality/value

While a number of researchers have emphasized the importance of perceived brand globalness for international consumer behavior, the present study is the first to the authors’ knowledge to investigate the relative importance of different cues in creating perceptions of brand globalness.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Timo Mandler

Despite considerable investigations of the various outcomes of perceived brand globalness (PBG), the concept itself remains ambiguous, demanding further conceptual…

1879

Abstract

Purpose

Despite considerable investigations of the various outcomes of perceived brand globalness (PBG), the concept itself remains ambiguous, demanding further conceptual refinement. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to global branding literature by suggesting an extended conceptualization of PBG, and empirically testing a corresponding extended model of global brand effects, relative to the conventional operationalization.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study (n=907) involving 63 brands across eight different product categories provides new insights into the composition of global brand effects by explicitly discriminating between different facets of consumers’ brand globalness perceptions (i.e. perceived market reach (PMR), perceived standardization (PST) and global consumer culture positioning (GCCP)).

Findings

The results clearly show that effects associated with global brands are not exclusively positive. While PMR and GCCP have positive effects on consumers’ brand evaluations and attitudes, PST has a strong negative effect on the same outcomes. These effects apply to both domestic and foreign global brands and occur irrespective of the perceived level of risk associated with a given product category.

Originality/value

The results provide managers a clearer picture of the up- and downsides of brand globalness perceptions and urge future studies on global brands to incorporate constructs that account for facets beyond a brand’s market reach to capture the phenomenon holistically.

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2022

Bangwool Han

This study aims to examine how perceptions of the globalness or localness of a brand affect the purchase intentions of consumers through the building of consumer–brand

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how perceptions of the globalness or localness of a brand affect the purchase intentions of consumers through the building of consumer–brand identification (CBI). This paper also explores the moderating effect of brand positioning (underdog vs top dog) on the relationship between perceived brand globalness or localness (PBG or PBL) and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested in two experimental studies. Data were collected through a set of structured questionnaires and analyzed using PROCESS modelling and analysis of variance.

Findings

The results show that CBI mediates the effect of PBG/PBL on purchase intentions. Moreover, the findings of Study 2 reveal that participants show greater purchase intention for PBL than for PBG in response to underdog positioning. However, in top dog positioning, the difference in purchase intention for PBL compared to PBG is attenuated.

Originality/value

This research investigates how CBI influences purchase intentions of consumers in regards to a brand’s perceived globalness or localness, which adds to the growing body of international branding research. This paper also addresses the effects of interaction between brand localness (globalness) and underdog (top dog) brand positioning on purchase intentions. Finally, this study concludes with a discussion of practical actions that international brand managers can take to enhance the effectiveness of their marketing strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Ankur Srivastava, Dipanjan Kumar Dey and Balaji M.S.

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of brand credibility on purchase intentions toward global brands and domestic brands in an emerging market context. It…

1816

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of brand credibility on purchase intentions toward global brands and domestic brands in an emerging market context. It further examines three drivers of brand credibility: perceived globalness, perceived local iconness and perceived authenticity.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Systematic random sampling using the mall intercept technique was used to collect cross-sectional data from 836 customers in India. Hypotheses were tested by using structural equation modeling with AMOS 21.

Findings

The results demonstrate the significance of brand credibility on purchase intentions. Furthermore, brand globalness differentially influence brand credibility for global and domestic brands.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide key insights for marketers regarding consumer evaluation of global brands and domestic brands in emerging markets.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by proposing and testing the key role of brand credibility in consumer choice of global brands versus domestic brands in an emerging market context.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

C. Min Han

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether or not the strategy of pursuing a global brand identity by leading Asian firms will produce intended outcomes in…

1704

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether or not the strategy of pursuing a global brand identity by leading Asian firms will produce intended outcomes in consumer responses. For this purpose, the study empirically examines whether global Japanese brands (e.g. Toyota) are perceived as global or Japanese by consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were conducted with Korean consumers for their evaluations of Japanese automobile brands with varying degrees of globalness. As for brands, the study divides Japanese brands into two groups – those with high brand globalness and those with low brand globalness – and to examine if Japanese-origin effects differ between these two groups.

Findings

In contrast to the hypothesis, global brands were found to be more subject to country-of-origin effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to research on consumer choices and brand globalness by showing country-of-origin effects for global brands.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that even when Asian firms emphasize the globalness of their brands, they may still need to attend to country-of-origin effects.

Originality/value

This study examines an unexplored issue of country-of-origin effects for global brands.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2022

Jiaxun He and Jiaye Ge

This study aims to investigate how brand innovativeness and national traditions influence perceived brand globalness and brand competence by affecting Brand-Nation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how brand innovativeness and national traditions influence perceived brand globalness and brand competence by affecting Brand-Nation Connection (BNC) in the changing world.

Design/methodology/approach

Besides the study of the development and validation of the BNC construct, this paper conducts two studies that use eight global brands from different categories to test hypotheses.

Findings

Two empirical studies show that brand innovativeness and national traditions have positive effects on BNC. Furthermore, technological turbulence moderates the impact of brand innovativeness on BNC, and cultural change moderates the relationship between national traditions and BNC. Meanwhile, BNC is an important determinant of perceived brand globalness, and both BNC and perceived brand globalness positively influence brand competence, with the former exerting a stronger effect.

Practical implications

The findings highlight that in the changing world, the coexistence of brand innovation and cultural traditions through strategic management is essential for brand competence. They also provide guidelines for emerging global brands to incorporate nation-related cues and global signals in their brand positioning to reinforce brand competence.

Originality/value

This study contributes to understanding how brand innovation and cultural traditions create value for emerging global brands in a rapidly changing environment. It also provides implications regarding how BNC helps emerging market brands to go global, and it presents a new understanding that both nation-level brand status and perceived brand globalness are signals that convey brand competence.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Warat Winit, Gary Gregory, Mark Cleveland and Peeter Verlegh

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the distinction between global and local brands, providing a more comprehensive framework, which considers both…

12139

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the distinction between global and local brands, providing a more comprehensive framework, which considers both geographical distribution and ownership. It examines main and interactive effects of consumers’ perceptions of these factors, and studies how ethnocentrism (CET) and price affect brand evaluations, considering a range of price difference thresholds.

Design/methodology/approach

A preliminary study (n=243) examined main and interaction effects of brand globalness and ownership on consumers’ brand quality attitudes and purchase intentions in four different product categories. The main study (n=558) further explored brand ownership effects by examining the interaction of CET and price differences.

Findings

The preliminary study confirmed the distinctiveness of brand globalness and ownership. Consumers evaluated global (vs non-global) brands more positively, regardless of brand ownership (local vs foreign). The main study found that effects of price and CET varied considerably across product categories.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of student samples from a single country (Thailand), and of scenarios instead of real life purchase decisions.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that perceived brand globalness positively impacts brand evaluations. Companies may cultivate a global brand image by emphasizing global cues. Local origin allows (global) brands to command a price premium, although this varies across product categories. An emphasis on globalness seems valuable, especially for local brands.

Originality/value

This research offers a refined conceptualization of brand globalness, a key construct in international marketing. Additional value is provided by studying price effects, which have received limited attention in international marketing, and substantial data collection (total N>800) in an understudied yet important economy (Thailand).

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Do Young Pyun, Hyungil H Kwon and Chul-Won Lee

This study assessed the mediation effect of perceived brand quality and the moderation effect of consumer ethnocentric tendency in the proposed consumption model of a…

Abstract

This study assessed the mediation effect of perceived brand quality and the moderation effect of consumer ethnocentric tendency in the proposed consumption model of a global sports brand. The English Premier League was selected as a global sports brand and four hypotheses were established to explain how consumers' perceived brand globalness affected their watching intention. Data were collected from 302 collegians in Republic of Korea. Results showed that perceived brand quality partially mediated the relationship between perceived brand globalness and watching intention, and ethnocentrism played a moderating role. The findings contribute to our understanding of consumption activities of global sport brands.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Vasileios Davvetas and Georgios Halkias

The dominant paradigm in international branding research treats perceived brand globalness (PBG) and localness (PBL) as attributes algebraically participating in brand

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Abstract

Purpose

The dominant paradigm in international branding research treats perceived brand globalness (PBG) and localness (PBL) as attributes algebraically participating in brand assessment and disregards the perception of brands as humanlike entities actively embedded in consumers’ social environments. Challenging this view and drawing from stereotype theory, the purpose of this paper is to suggest that PBG/PBL trigger the categorization of products under the superordinate mental categories of global/local brands which carry distinct stereotypical content. Such content transfers to every individual product for which category membership is established and shapes brand responses.

Design/methodology/approach

One experimental study (Study1, n=134) tests the process of global/local brand stereotype formation, identification and content transfer. Subsequently, two consumer surveys test the impact of brand stereotypes on brand approach/avoidance tendencies (Study2, n=328) and consumer–brand relationships (Study3, n=273). Data were analyzed with experimental techniques and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings suggest that upon categorization under the global or local brand class, individual brands are charged with the stereotypical content of the class. Global brands are predominantly stereotyped as competent while local brands are predominantly stereotyped as warm. Localness-induced warmth has uniformly positive effects, whereas globalness-induced competence acts as a double-edged sword which can both help and harm the brand.

Originality/value

This research contributes by proposing a novel conceptualization of global and local brands as groups of intentional marketplace agents stereotyped along their intentions and abilities, empirically establishing the process through which individual brands are assigned stereotypical judgments and demonstrating how these judgments impact critical brand outcomes and consumer–brand relationships.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Salah Hassan, Melika Husić-Mehmedović and Philippe Duverger

Despite the changing conditions worldwide, some global luxury brands have attained strong performance levels, and perhaps it is their globalness that keeps them resilient…

4130

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the changing conditions worldwide, some global luxury brands have attained strong performance levels, and perhaps it is their globalness that keeps them resilient. Since the global luxury market is comprised of customer segments with relatively homogeneous needs, wants and motivations, achieving a global luxury brand positioning will help mitigate the negative consequences of economic crises, regardless of the market in which a luxury brand operates. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was administered to a sample of 200 professionals located in a European country where none of the global brands cited in the paper are originating. The country was also selected on the basis of its propensity to have local luxury brands in competition with the global brands in each of the categories tested. The survey was conducted during the peak of economic crisis in Europe.

Findings

This study provides evidence that brand globalness may be a major value creating factor, and thus a source of competitive advantage for luxury brands competing in the global marketplace. Another question addressed by this study is should the luxury brand modulate the message projected in the media away from luxury and closer to quality or other stimuli less associated with luxury in order to avoid luxury shame. All these are questions addressed by this imperial study to investigate how the brand globalness influences consumer perceptions in global recessionary times.

Originality/value

The proposed research formulates an empirical study of the underlining effects of what is referred to as “glocalization” in the literature on the luxury positioning. This study provides evidence that brand globalness may be a major value creating factor, and thus a source of competitive advantage for a luxury company competing in the global marketplace.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of 337