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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Paul Ainsworth

Investigates the factors determining the quality of milk and heat‐treated milk products. Discusses the composition and structure of milk with particular reference to proteins, fat…

1501

Abstract

Investigates the factors determining the quality of milk and heat‐treated milk products. Discusses the composition and structure of milk with particular reference to proteins, fat and lactose with emphasis on emulsion stability, fat globules and the casein micelles. Describes the preservation of milk by heat treatment to produce pasteurized, sterilized, ultra heat‐treated milks, and the chemical and physical changes taking place during this processing.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Paul Ainsworth and Claudio Vignali

253

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Hayley Marson, Louise McErlain and Paul Ainsworth

This research evaluates the extent of food wastage on a renal ward, in a large NHS Trust hospital. The study consisted of baseline data collection, to establish the current…

1770

Abstract

This research evaluates the extent of food wastage on a renal ward, in a large NHS Trust hospital. The study consisted of baseline data collection, to establish the current situation regarding food wastage on a mixed gender renal ward, and two phases. Phase I assessed the adequacy of the plate regeneration system. Phase II involved the trial of a bulk regeneration system. Food wastage measurements collected in Phase I and Phase II were compared. Baseline data indicated a considerable amount of food wastage. In Phase I food wastage figures remained excessive ( \overline x = 65 percent) and poor dietary intakes prevailed ( \overline x = 1,125kcals). In Phase II, food wastage figures were greatly reduced to 17 percent ( \overline x). It is estimated the introduction of the bulk regeneration system, on a renal ward, would save £18,19.00 per annum for lunchtime waste alone.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Paul Ainsworth

Uses the basic chemical and physical information discussed in “Milk and milk products I” and applies this information to a range of other milk products. Describes the methods of…

1021

Abstract

Uses the basic chemical and physical information discussed in “Milk and milk products I” and applies this information to a range of other milk products. Describes the methods of preparation of concentrated and dried milks, cream and butter, and fermented milk products, particularly yogurt and cheese. Discusses the chemical and physical changes taking place during the preparation of these products and how these changes determine the quality characteristics.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

David Patient and Paul Ainsworth

Concentrates on the type and importance of flour proteins by discussingtheir structure and evaluating their function in bread making. Intendsto introduce the reader to some of the…

4221

Abstract

Concentrates on the type and importance of flour proteins by discussing their structure and evaluating their function in bread making. Intends to introduce the reader to some of the complex interactions which take place during the preparation of bread by discussing some of the chemical and physical changes which are involved in bread making. Examines the composition of wheat flour and discusses an explanation of its suitability as a bread‐making flour. Emphasizes the importance of protein type in flour and how these proteins can be identified in flour. Explains the development of the gluten network, essential for the production of bread.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Paul Ainsworth

Investigates the factors which determine the quality attribute oftexture. Discusses the contribution the various types of plant cellsmake to the texture of fruit and vegetables…

1723

Abstract

Investigates the factors which determine the quality attribute of texture. Discusses the contribution the various types of plant cells make to the texture of fruit and vegetables and analyses in more detail individual plant cells and their characteristics which contribute to texture. Emphasizes the importance to texture of the chemical composites such as the concentration and types of macromolecules in the plant cell wall and the water bound to these polymers. Looks at factors influencing the texture of fruit and vegetables after harvesting, such as storage and cooking, in terms of the chemical and physical changes which occur.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Alison Rudder, Paul Ainsworth and David Holgate

This paper seeks to evaluate the ideas of six new product development (NPD) theorists and their associates. These include those who have developed their theories with particular…

10141

Abstract

This paper seeks to evaluate the ideas of six new product development (NPD) theorists and their associates. These include those who have developed their theories with particular reference to the food industry and the development of new food products. Their ideas are contrasted with non‐food specific theorists; these include those interested in the management of new products and those involved in marketing who have recognised the important role that NPD plays in any business. A further viewpoint is taken from theorists who are interested in NPD per se and who use food, on occasions, to illustrate their ideas. This research identifies different theories and recognises that there is very little consensus as to the right and wrong way to manage the process of product development. Indeed theorists name and number their various stages or phases differently with some advocating five while others believe eight steps to be more appropriate. This research concludes that an organisation should not be tied to one particular model but should take on board the basic fundamentals of a food‐based model (theory) and adapt and amend it to their particular situations as and when they develop new food products.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1928

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so, rising from…

Abstract

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so, rising from the greater value placed upon the recreations of the people in recent decades. It has the name of the pleasure city of the north, a huge caravansary into which the large industrial cities empty themselves at the holiday seasons. But Blackpool is more than that; it is a town with a vibrating local life of its own; it has its intellectual side even if the casual visitor does not always see it as readily as he does the attractions of the front. A week can be spent profitably there even by the mere intellectualist.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1948

FROM everywhere there are reports of increased issues of books from libraries. The famine in copies no doubt accounts in part for it and, probably, there is also what is almost a…

Abstract

FROM everywhere there are reports of increased issues of books from libraries. The famine in copies no doubt accounts in part for it and, probably, there is also what is almost a resurgence of effort after knowledge amongst young men and women who are endeavouring in many fields of work to recover some of the losses of the war years. We cannot recall at any time when so much hard grinding study was being done as now. Pessimists about youth and juvenile delinquency (which however is incidental to a much younger age than that we are contemplating) would do well to reflect upon this fact. Whatever the cause, the immediate prospects for libraries in universities, works, and social institutions of every sort were never brighter. We know that certain types of “economist” of the faded “retrenchment and reform” type say the situation is temporary and artificial but, even if it is, and we are by no means acquiescent in this opinion, much ground may be won and held from any temporary good period. We think librarianship, under the present leadership of the Library Association, may be able to consolidate the position both for public and for other kinds of libraries. The Association was never better led than since the war; it has had remarkably statesmenlike presidents, an active council and an Honorary Secretary who for constructive capacity, vision, literary skill and fearlessness, combined with an energy and industry that leaves most of his contemporaries breathless, has not been surpassed; and he is backed by a Staff that rises to the ever‐increasing demands of the service. We are glad to write this last sentence, for Secretary Welsford has to cover many duties and serve many causes: receive and entertain the Association's guests from overseas; look after meetings; the educational services which now are very great; attend to the troubles of librarians everywhere and advise in them about matters ranging from salaries to ethics; our publications, accounts, catering, interviewing, negotiating with public departments and other bodies. As for the meetings of the Council and its committees, we are told, not by Mr. Welsford who knows nothing of this note, that its reports and papers ran in March alone to 200 foolscap typed pages! Of course Mr. Welsford has an excellent staff which assists him with real live interest. The time has come, however, as our readers now know, when special senior officers to deal with Membership and Education respectively are to be appointed to work side by side with the Librarian, the excellent Mr. Henrik Jones (who never fails the searcher, even the youngest, and seems to know what we are all doing) to carry “at a high level” some of the burdens. Annual Reports are not always read but we were drawn to these reflections by the recently issued Report of the Library Association for the year. We commend it to those who are inclined to leave it unread.

Details

New Library World, vol. 50 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1912

THE question of the advisability of exercising a censorship over literature has been much before the public of late, and probably many librarians have realised how closely the…

Abstract

THE question of the advisability of exercising a censorship over literature has been much before the public of late, and probably many librarians have realised how closely the disputed question affects their own profession.

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of 181