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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

V.N. Balasubramanyam and D.T. Nguyen

This paper reviews the nature, extent, and determinants of the overseas operations of the British food and drink processing industries with a view to analysing the…

Abstract

This paper reviews the nature, extent, and determinants of the overseas operations of the British food and drink processing industries with a view to analysing the competitiveness of the sector in international markets.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2012

Magdalena Nowak, Yvonne Jeanes and Sue Reeves

Leisure centres and health clubs are ideal places for promoting healthy lifestyle. They promote physical exercise and many activities for children, such as swimming, soft…

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1012

Abstract

Purpose

Leisure centres and health clubs are ideal places for promoting healthy lifestyle. They promote physical exercise and many activities for children, such as swimming, soft play areas, crèche, and team sports. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the food environment for children in leisure centres and health clubs in London.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 67 venues were visited. All food and drink options were recorded and the proportion of “healthy” options was calculated according to the School Food Trust criteria and Nutrient Profiling Model.

Findings

In total, 96 per cent of the venues had vending machines and 51 per cent had onsite restaurants/cafés. According to The School Food Trust criteria, only 13 per cent of vending machine drinks, 77.2 per cent of meals, and 24 per cent of snacks would be allowed in school canteens.

Research limitations/implications

The study revealed that a low proportion of healthy foods and drinks were offered to children in Leisure centres in London. However, the survey was only extended to venues in the capital.

Practical implications

The results of the study suggest that new recommendations such as the Healthy Food Code of Good Practice, omitted leisure centres. The findings presented here could provide scientific evidence for campaigns and interventions aimed at improving the quality and the appropriateness of foods and drinks offered to children.

Originality/value

The paper shows that health campaigns and legislation should target leisure centres and health clubs, in order to improve the food and drinks facilities and promote healthy eating, particularly in light of the upcoming Olympic Games in London 2012.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

George Lodorfos, Anastasia Konstantopoulou, Ioannis Kostopoulos and Eyo Emmanuel Essien

The food and drink industry is one of the world’s largest manufacturing sectors and an integral part of the world’s social, economic and cultural mix. As well as…

Abstract

The food and drink industry is one of the world’s largest manufacturing sectors and an integral part of the world’s social, economic and cultural mix. As well as contributing to the economic development of nations, manufacturers have a key strategic role to play in ensuring fair trade between nations and future food security against the combined effects of climate change, higher global demand and increasing pressure on finite resources.

In an uncertain market environment, ensuring the highest quality and food safety, improving prosperity and fair trade agreements require the industry, policymakers and society to work together towards these goals. There is also a need for an increased emphasis within the industry and its full supply chain network on the broader social and economic impact of food and drink production, distribution, purchasing and consumption.

In this chapter, the authors undertake a literature and secondary data review and analyse what makes the European food and drink industry one of the world’s leading manufacturing sectors. This chapter provides an overview of the industry and the current state of the sector. It covers issues relating to manufacturing, consumers’ purchasing behaviours, distribution, marketing and retail, and the wider environmental trends, structures and economics of the industry. Finally, it presents some likely future trajectories in terms of social, consumer and regulatory trends, such as technological, marketing and production practices that develop and, in many cases, lead to new business models and paradigms.

Details

The Sustainable Marketing Concept in European SMEs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-039-2

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Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Angela Poech, Tom C. Peisl and Tina Lorenz

Ethical Entrepreneurship; Internationalization of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Subject area

Ethical Entrepreneurship; Internationalization of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Study level/applicability

Bachelor and Master courses in International Management and Entrepreneurship.

Case overview

A German medical scientist developed a product which was able to absorb alcohol in blood and consequently reduced the alcohol-level. He tested it with the participation of 170 volunteers at a private party. The product was consumed after alcohol consumption and the result was an alcohol reduction by 20-70 per cent. In addition, the volunteers had either no or only small symptoms of a hangover. The students shall discuss the different business models the medical scientist could implement by taking into account ethical issues. To give them necessary working data, the case includes European environmental data (including information about the European food industry and the functional drink market), an insight into the European legal issues of starting a business in the food segment (including definitions of “food”, “food supplement” and “health claim regulation” and how these factors impact entrepreneurial decisions), current events in the European food branch and examples of possible competitors. The case is built on a real product development and on current information and facts.

Expected learning outcomes

To become involved with entrepreneurial thinking and entrepreneurial decision-making. To debate ethical issues in the entrepreneurial process. To become aware of the complexity of internationalization in the field of SME as well as to reflect upon and sketch appropriate strategies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems…

Abstract

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems new. This will sometimes happen after a long period of indecision or when things are extremely difficult, as they have long been for the country, in most homes and among ordinary individuals. Watching one's life savings dwindle away, the nest‐egg laid down for security in an uncertain world, is a frightening process. This has happened to the nation, once the richest in the world, and ot its elderly people, most of them taught the habit of saving in early youth. We are also taught that what has been is past changing; the clock cannot be put back, and the largesse—much of it going to unprincipled spongers—distributed by a spendthrift Government as token relief is no answer, not even to present difficulties. The response can only come by a change of heart in those whose brutal selfishness have caused it all; and this may be a long time in coming. In the meantime, it is a useful exercise to consider our assets, to recognize those which must be protected at all costs and upon which, when sanity returns, the future depends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Stephen J. French, Nicholas W. Read, David A. Booth and Susan Arkley

Eating and drinking temporarily suppress the desire to eat and/orthe desire to drink. These satiating effects are learned responses tocomplex patterns of stimulation from…

Abstract

Eating and drinking temporarily suppress the desire to eat and/or the desire to drink. These satiating effects are learned responses to complex patterns of stimulation from available foods and drinks and the external and internal environments. Considers the possible roles of physiological actions of ingested foods and beverages in the signals from the body which contribute to the sense of repletion, the dulling of hunger and the quenching of thirst.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Joyce Hughes

Presents the findings of the eating out extension of the National Food Survey 1994. Finds that on average 28 per cent of the total household food and drink expenditure is…

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1299

Abstract

Presents the findings of the eating out extension of the National Food Survey 1994. Finds that on average 28 per cent of the total household food and drink expenditure is spent outside the home. Discusses the trends in food type, amount spent, facilities used and nutritional contradiction in relation to household composition, age groups, sex, income and region of the country.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Wimalin Rimpeekool, Martyn Kirk, Vasoontara Yiengprugsawan, Cathy Banwell, Sam-ang Seubsman and Adrian Sleigh

The purpose of this paper is to assess the usefulness of nutrition labels in Thailand during nutrition transition from traditional to modern diets that increase salt…

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2307

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the usefulness of nutrition labels in Thailand during nutrition transition from traditional to modern diets that increase salt, sugar, and calorie intake and to note socio-demographic interactions and associations with consumption of transitional processed foods.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors studied 42,750 distance learning Open University adults aged 23-96 years in 2013 residing nationwide and participating in an ongoing community-based prospective cohort study. The authors used multivariable logistic regression to relate nutrition label experiences (“read”, “good understand”, “frequent use”), socio-demographic factors, and consumption of four transitional foods. These foods included “unhealthy” instant foods, carbonated soft drinks, and sweet drinks, or “healthy” milk.

Findings

Overall, two-thirds reported good understanding and frequent use of nutrition labels. Unhealthy transition-indicator processed foods were frequently consumed: instant foods (7 per cent), (carbonated) soft drinks (15 per cent), and sweet drinks (41 per cent). Frequent users of nutrition labels (e.g. females, older persons, professionals) were less likely to consume unhealthy indicator foods. Those with the most positive overall nutrition label experience (“read” + “good understanding” + “frequent use”) had the best indicator food profiles: instant foods (odds ratio (OR) 0.63; 95%CI, 0.56-0.70); soft drinks (OR 0.56; 95%CI, 0.52-0.61); sweet drinks (OR 0.79; 95%CI, 0.74-0.85); milk (OR 1.87; 95%CI, 1.74-2.00).

Originality/value

Knowledge protected – those with most nutrition label experience were least likely to consume unhealthy foods. Results support government regulated nutrition labels, expanding to include sweet drinks. The study is remarkable for its large size and nationwide footprint. Study subjects were educated, represent Thais of the future, and show high awareness of transition-indicator foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Anis Najiha Ahmad, Tajul A. Yang and Wan Nadiah Wan Abdullah

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived knowledge of the general concept of halal food and actual knowledge of halal food principles with emphasis on…

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1277

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived knowledge of the general concept of halal food and actual knowledge of halal food principles with emphasis on alcohol (alcoholic drinks and ethanol).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional descriptive survey, using quantitative research methods, was utilized. A self-administered survey was distributed to 188 undergraduate students of the food technology programme at Universiti Sains Malaysia, and a total of 114 responses were obtained.

Findings

Results indicate that respondents believed that they have above average competence regarding the concept, sources, ingredients, processing and the overall production of halal foods (score: 3.75-4.18). In addition, all of the 114 respondents also agreed that alcoholic drinks are fundamentally prohibited in Islam. However, the survey also revealed that the respondents were less certain about the application of alcohol in halal food production. Respondents’ actual knowledge on these issues was low to average.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by its cross-sectional nature. In addition, the research was only conducted on undergraduate-level students of the food technology programme, and therefore, results derived might not be generalized to the other segments of the population. The overall uncertainty and misconception about the application of alcohol in halal food highlights the need to improve the knowledge of these undergraduate students to more than a mere theory of the concepts of halal and haram.

Originality/value

No previous study has been conducted to explore the issue pertaining to alcohol in halal food, and this paper categorically strives to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Deborah Albon

The purpose of this paper is to examine why the uptake of free milk in a particular nursery class was low, to explore the meanings children attribute to drinks given to…

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584

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why the uptake of free milk in a particular nursery class was low, to explore the meanings children attribute to drinks given to them in school and those brought from home, and make suggestions as to what might be done to improve children's intake of free school milk.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a case study of a nursery class attached to a primary school in West London. A total of 24 morning sessions were observed, comprising of 72 snack times. In addition, interviews were carried out with parents and early years' practitioners i.e. teachers and nursery nurses. Children's views were elicited through use of narrative observations and an activity using their drinks' cartons.

Findings

This study found that these young children linked drinks brought in from home to having choices whereas drinking school milk was associated with having little or no choice. Unlike school milk, drinks from home were linked to stories of personal identity and family life. The children seemed to exert pressure on their parents to provide them with a drink from home and appeared to be attracted to drinks that included representations of characters from popular culture as well as particular brands.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on one case study, therefore issues raised may not be generalisable to all nursery settings.

Practical implications

This paper encourages early years' practitioners to look in detail at how they organize snack times and the way that this might contribute to negative perceptions of healthy foods/drinks. It offers practical suggestions around how the uptake of milk could be improved in a nursery setting, emphasizing the need for the active involvement of the children. In addition, the study highlights the importance of informal as well as formal discussions with parents about food and drinks. The study recommends that improvements need to be made to early years' practitioners' initial and subsequent training in this area, given the significant role they play in health promotion.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in the way it elicits the active participation of young children in the research as well as the focus on the minutiae of nursery practice and its implications for promoting healthy eating/drinking.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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