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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Opeolu M. Ogundele, Sefia T. Muazu, Ajibola B. Oyedeji, Eugénie Kayitesi, Patrick B. Njobeh and Samson A. Oyeyinka

Cassava is a starchy crop with several industrial applications, but it deteriorates very fast after harvest. Refrigeration has been used to extend the storage life of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Cassava is a starchy crop with several industrial applications, but it deteriorates very fast after harvest. Refrigeration has been used to extend the storage life of the root and the starch isolated from the stored roots characterized. Hence, the purpose of this research is to investigate the chemical, functional, pasting and sensory properties of custard prepared from starch isolated from refrigerated cassava root.

Design/methodology/approach

Freshly harvest cassava root were cleaned and stored in a refrigerator operating at 4 °C for a period of one, two and three weeks. Starch was extracted from the fresh and stored roots using established method and custard prepared from each of the starch sample. The custard sample was analysed for amylose content, functional, pasting and sensory properties.

Findings

Amylose content in the pastes varied significantly from 18.45 to 25.45%. Refrigeration showed a significant impact on the swelling power of the custard, which could be linked to variation in amylose content. Colour and textural properties of the custard were similar across the samples suggesting a minimal impact of refrigeration on the isolated starch. Refrigerated cassava roots can produce acceptable custard with minimal changes in sensory properties if the storage period is closely monitored.

Originality/value

In a previous study, the authors have shown that starch and cooked paste may be made from stored cassava roots without substantial changes in the quality of these products. This study further confirms the possibility of using starch from the stored roots in food applications such as in custard formulation. No report has documented the properties of custard from starch obtained from refrigerated cassava root.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Makumba Chewe Temba, Patrick Njobeh, Derek Ndinteh and Eugenie Kayitesi

The purpose of this study was to composite maize, a cereal grain with low protein and lysine content, with groundnut a rich source of protein, to improve the nutritional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to composite maize, a cereal grain with low protein and lysine content, with groundnut a rich source of protein, to improve the nutritional quality of maize–groundnut composite flours and their resultant porridges.

Design/methodology/approach

Defatted and full fat groundnut flours were used to prepare maize–groundnut composite flours and porridges at the ratio of 100:0, 55:45, 70:30 and 85:15, respectively. They were analyzed for proximate composition, energy value, amino acid and fatty acid profiles.

Findings

Compositing maize with groundnut significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased proteins from 10 per cent in maize flour to up to 21 per cent in composite porridge (denoted DFC1). The energy values for composite porridges were 434 Kcal/100 g when compared with 398 Kcal/100 g established for maize porridge alone. Lysine content was three times higher in composite flours than for maize flour, while for composite porridges, lysine was four times higher than in maize porridge. There was an increase of 35 per cent in oleic acid content when maize flour was composited with groundnut flour.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to evaluate the properties of full fat and defatted maize–groundnut porridges and their effects on consumer acceptability.

Originality/value

It can be concluded that compositing maize with full fat and defatted groundnut has the capability of improving the nutritional quality of cereal-based diets consequently contributing to a significant increase in nutritional security of African populations and those of other developing countries of the world.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Samson A. Oyeyinka, Aminat O. Abdulsalam, Amina M. Ahmed El-Imam, Adewumi T. Oyeyinka, Omotola Folake Olagunju, Fausat L. Kolawole, Abimbola K. Arise, Emmanuel O. Adedeji and Patrick B. Njobeh

Bambara groundnut is a hard-to-cook grain and this has limited its utilisation to some extent. However, the grain is a good source of phytochemicals with antioxidant…

Abstract

Purpose

Bambara groundnut is a hard-to-cook grain and this has limited its utilisation to some extent. However, the grain is a good source of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. This study investigated the total phenol content, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial potentials of hot-water extract of four Bambara groundnuts differentiated by their seed coats (cream, black, maroon and brown).

Design/methodology/approach

Bambara grains were heated in water at a ratio 1:20 (w/v) and the grains brought to boiling in a controlled water bath. As soon as boiling started, the temperature was reduced to 90 °C to reduce the evaporation rate. The extracts were withdrawn within 30 min, which was chosen from a preliminary study where beyond this time, the extract was drying off and the amount of solution obtained was not sufficient for the initial run. Grain colour and composition and antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties of the extract were determined using standard methods.

Findings

Protein (20.57–26.31%) and carbohydrate (55.43–61.09%) were the major components of the grain. Grain type and boiling time generally affected the total phenolic content of the extract. Cream Bambara displayed substantially lower total phenolic content at all boiling times compared with the maroon, brown and black Bambara groundnuts. The total flavonoid contents and total phenolic contents of the Bambara groundnut extracts were dependent on the boiling time and type of grain. The extracts showed no activity against Candida albicans, but the maroon coat Bambara demonstrated a peak inhibition of 6.00 mm against Escherichia coli. The total phenolic, flavonoid contents and the antioxidant properties of the grains generally followed the order Maroon > Black > Brown.

Originality/value

This study has demonstrated the possibility of promoting the use of Bambara groundnut beyond the current level of usage by using simple processing method of boiling to extract phytochemicals with medicinal properties.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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