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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Linh Cuong Nguyen, Helen Partridge and Sylvia L. Edwards

The purpose of this paper is to debate the evolving relationship between libraries and users, and to justify the idea of participatory library and the use of the  

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to debate the evolving relationship between libraries and users, and to justify the idea of participatory library and the use of the “participatory library” term. The paper also discusses the development trend of the participatory library and calls for empirical research on this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Various sources of literature are collected and examined. Together with the inclusion of personal ideas and experience, a wide range of opinions on the contemporary library is compared and synthesised.

Findings

The paper presents changes in the relationship between libraries and users in various periods of library development. It indicates an excessive attention on Library 2.0 while neglecting the participatory nature of the contemporary library. It also suggests that the term “participatory library” should be used as this term reflects the true nature of the contemporary library, and calls for empirical work on participatory library.

Originality/value

This discussion is moving forward and challenging our thinking about the participatory library. It provides librarians, library managers, scholars, and the library community with a fresh perspective on the contemporary library.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Joseph Deodato

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical framework for applying Web 2.0 technologies and design principles to the development of participatory cultures within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a theoretical framework for applying Web 2.0 technologies and design principles to the development of participatory cultures within libraries. A participatory culture is one that focusses on facilitating interaction and the creation of content by users rather than the consumption of content created or compiled by experts.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a literature-based theoretical analysis that explores the role of libraries as agents of cultural hegemony and techniques for developing socially responsible library praxis. It combines insights from a variety of discourses including Western Marxist theories of hegemony, critical theories of library and information science, professional literature regarding “Library 2.0” service models, and media studies theories of participatory culture.

Findings

Libraries do not just organize knowledge; they construct it. Furthermore, these constructions tend to reinforce dominant discourses while marginalizing others. By adopting participatory technologies and design principles, libraries can support greater diversity of expression and create spaces for marginalized discourses.

Practical implications

This paper offers suggestions for applying principles of participatory culture to the design of library services such as collection development, cataloging and classification, reference, instruction, and institutional repositories.

Originality/value

This paper provides a conceptual framework for understanding and evaluating the significance of Web 2.0 for library and information science by applying theoretical perspectives from other disciplines.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

M. Catherine Hirschbiel and Julie Petzold

To report on the process of redesigning a previously inaccessible room in the center of Emerson College’s Iwasaki Library for student use.

Abstract

Purpose

To report on the process of redesigning a previously inaccessible room in the center of Emerson College’s Iwasaki Library for student use.

Methodology/approach

Library staff solicited input from multiple stakeholders through informal suggestion boards; conversations with staff and faculty; a 3-hour Participatory Design Workshop (PDW) with students, both undergraduates and graduates from multiple departments; and a month-long collaboration with a Business Studies class. A particular emphasis was placed on student input in the design process because of their status as the library’s primary users.

Findings

It was not possible to incorporate all of the students’ suggestions into the final design: particularly the requests for a homey, “living room” feel. However, through repeated inquiry, the library was able to find a match between some of the things students wanted and what the library could provide, namely a flexible event and study space.

Originality/value

Although libraries do not often have the opportunity to “expand” with their existing footprints, this chapter will be of use to other libraries planning an expansion or renovation. Library expansion is often dependent on well-documented need and student voices can have a high impact and, therefore, should play a critical role in the design process.

Details

The Future of Library Space
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-270-5

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Hanna Carlsson

The purpose of this paper is to sketch out the general tendencies, gaps and opportunities within the body of research studying the social web as a new facet of public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to sketch out the general tendencies, gaps and opportunities within the body of research studying the social web as a new facet of public librarianship in order to delineate the findings so far and suggest directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature searches were conducted through the Library, Information Science and Technology Abstract database, The ISI Web of Science database and the Directory of Open Access Journals. A selection process in two steps resulted in 44 articles that were subjected to a two-stage analysis and coding process: a coding analysis based on the stated aims or research questions of each article and analysis of the articles as clusters around a shared theme.

Findings

The articles, exhibiting a richness and diversity in research directions, are dispersed in a wide range of journals and the topics addressed cover a variety of segments within Library and Information Science. Despite this diversity, research exploring the consequences of the social web for public libraries in situ and considerations of research on the broader political economic conditions of the public library institution in late modernity is largely lacking. Furthermore, the status of librarianship and the professional expertise of librarians, in light of the social web, need to be further addressed.

Originality/value

The rising interest and investment of library professionals into the practices, principles and technologies of the social web calls for further studies into the consequences of this ongoing development for public library services. This paper gives a preliminary overview of the research done 2006-2012 and identifies gaps in the literature that may serve as a point of departure for future research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Meen Chul Kim, Yuanyuan Feng and Yongjun Zhu

Library Hi Tech is one of the most influential journals that publish leading research in library and information science (LIS). The present study aims to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

Library Hi Tech is one of the most influential journals that publish leading research in library and information science (LIS). The present study aims to understand the scholarly communication in Library Hi Tech by profiling its historic footprint, emerging trends and knowledge diffusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 3,131 bibliographic records between 1995 and 2018 were collected from the Web of Science. Text mining, graph analysis and data visualization were used to analyze subject category assignment, domain-level citation trends, co-occurrence of keywords, keyword bursts, networks of document co-citation and landmark articles.

Findings

Findings indicated that published research in the journal was largely influenced by the psychology, education and social domain as a unidisciplinary discipline. Knowledge of the journal has been disseminated into multiple domains such as LIS, computer science and education. Dominant thematic concentrations were also identified: (1) library services in academic libraries and related to digital libraries, (2) adoption of new information technologies and (3) information-seeking behavior in these contexts. Additionally, the journal has exhibited an increased research emphasis on mixed-method user-centered studies and investigations into libraries' use of new media.

Originality/value

This study provides a promising approach to understand scientific trends and the intellectual growth of journals. It also helps Library Hi Tech to become more self-explanatory with a detailed bibliometric profile and to identify future directions in editorship and readership. Finally, researchers in the community can better position their studies within the emerging trends and current challenges of the journal.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Namjoo Choi and Lindsey M. Harper

The purpose of this paper is to update Carlsson (2015), which examined the research on public libraries and the social web published from 2006 to 2012, and it also intends…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to update Carlsson (2015), which examined the research on public libraries and the social web published from 2006 to 2012, and it also intends to go beyond Carlsson (2015) by including six additional variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature searches were performed against Web of Science Core Collection and EBSCOhost databases. By adapting Carlsson’s (2015) three level key phrase searches, which were then complemented by chain searching, a total of 60 articles were identified and analyzed.

Findings

In comparison to Carlsson (2015), this study shows that the recent research, published between 2012 and 2018, leans toward a more general acceptance of the social web’s usage to improve the services provided by public libraries; that the public library is rarely premised to be in a state of crisis; and that the social web is mostly perceived as having a complementary relationship with librarianship and library services. The findings from analyzing the six additional variables are also presented.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study provide LIS professionals a greater understanding of where the research stands on the topic at present, and this study also identifies gaps in the literature to offer insight into the areas where future research can be directed.

Originality/value

Given the continued popularity of social web usage among public libraries, this study examines the literature published on the social web in the public library context between 2012 and 2018 and offers implications and future research suggestions.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Edda Tandi Lwoga

This study aims to examine the suitability of information systems (IS) success model in the adoption of library 2.0 technologies among undergraduate students in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the suitability of information systems (IS) success model in the adoption of library 2.0 technologies among undergraduate students in the African context, and focused at the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) of Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the IS success model, the study re‐specified and validated the IS model to examine adoption of library 2.0 technologies via a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. The study examined the role of quality (service quality, information quality and system quality) in influencing user perceived net benefits, satisfaction and intention to reuse library 2.0 application. A case study research design was used in this study. Self‐administered questionnaire were distributed to all first year undergraduate students (n=408) at MUHAS, with a rate of return of 71.8%.

Findings

The study findings confirm the validity of using the proposed IS model for library 2.0 adoption assessment. The users’ intention to reuse is quite important, and accurately predicts the usage behaviour of library 2.0 services. The perceived net benefits had the strongest effect on users’ intention to reuse library 2.0 systems than any other determinants within the model. Among the three quality‐related constructs, service quality had the strongest total effect on perceived net benefits and intention to reuse. Compared to system quality, information quality had the largest effect on user satisfaction. It is thus important for librarians to consider all these factors for effective adoption of library 2.0 projects in research and academic institutions.

Originality

This is the first comprehensive study focusing on the health sciences library patron's usage behaviour of library 2.0 applications in Tanzania, and reveals findings that are useful for planning and implementing library 2.0 initiatives in other institutions with similar conditions.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2012

Kate Davis, Gillian Hallam, Katya Henry, Wendy Davis, Kysira Fairbairn and Ellen Heidelberger

The article aims to review a university course, offered to students in both Australia and Germany, to encourage them to learn about designing, implementing, marketing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to review a university course, offered to students in both Australia and Germany, to encourage them to learn about designing, implementing, marketing and evaluating information programs and services in order to build active and engaged communities. The concepts and processes of Web 2.0 technologies come together in the learning activities, with students establishing their own personal learning networks (PLNs).

Design/methodology/approach

The case study examines the principles of learning and teaching that underpin the course and presents the students' own experiences of the challenges they faced as they explored the interactive, participative and collaborative dimensions of the web.

Findings

The online format of the course and the philosophy of learning through play provided students with a safe and supportive environment for them to move outside of their comfort zones, to be creative, to experiment and to develop their professional personas. Reflection on learning was a key component that stressed the value of reflective practice in assisting library and information science (LIS) professionals to adapt confidently to the rapidly changing work environment.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into the opportunities for LIS courses to work across geographical boundaries, to allow students to critically appraise library practice in different contexts and to become active participants in wider professional networks.

Details

New Library World, vol. 113 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Mary M. Somerville and Margaret Brown‐Sica

Libraries required to accommodate new services within existing facilities can benefit from an inclusive planning approach which produces a design concept and project…

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries required to accommodate new services within existing facilities can benefit from an inclusive planning approach which produces a design concept and project phases for repurposing space. In the process, organizational decision making can move from print‐centered to program‐driven through intention use of information to learn. This paper seeks to explore this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Participatory action research (PAR) offers an action‐oriented and learning‐centered approach to (re)design of library facilities through an iterative plan‐act‐observe‐reflect cycle. Auraria Library's culminating charette illustrates the efficacy of PAR principles and practices for repurposing library facilities in response to changing user demands.

Findings

Over an 18‐month period, participatory action research activities fostered data collection and interpretation activities, preparatory to a two‐day design charette conducted with and for members of campus constituencies. In addition to clarifying design elements for project phases with estimated budgets, the inclusive inquiry processes initiated campus relationships essential to successful project implementation.

Research limitations/implications

This research study reports the latest findings in a series of North American implementation projects begun in 2003. The most ambitious to date, it involves library staff and campus stakeholders in inclusive library redesign processes.

Practical implications

Amidst dynamically changing internal and external circumstances, libraries can employ participatory action research principles and practices to use information to learn. The Auraria Library example illustrates the transferability of using inclusive information‐centered and learning‐focused approaches for organizational direction setting.

Social implications

The purpose of the action‐oriented and learning‐focused approach is to engage participants in using information to learn. Participatory action research is therefore intrinsically emancipatory.

Originality/value

A paucity of professional literature on participatory action research exists in the library and information science field. Therefore, this contribution both offers a promising approach for collaborative decision making and fills a gap in the professional knowledge base.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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