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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Richard D. Waters and Jennifer L. Lemanski

The purpose of this paper is to compare the communication styles on the web sites of a random sample of the top American corporations and non‐profit organizations. By…

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2323

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the communication styles on the web sites of a random sample of the top American corporations and non‐profit organizations. By revisiting the traditional approach to understanding strategic communication, the four models of public relations provide insights into the direction and nature of organizational communication.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of Fortune 500 (n=180) and Philanthropy 400 (n=170) was conducted. Although public relations research has never measured internet communication using the four models, the researchers created original scales to measure their web performance.

Findings

The research reveals that both corporations and non‐profits have strong preferences for using one‐way communication on their web sites. However, both groups moderately incorporated two‐way communication practices as corporations were more likely to use two‐way research practices and non‐profits were more likely to engage in conversations online.

Originality/value

This research examines organizational communication by returning to a previous method of analysis that has been cast aside by current scholars. However, assessing communication from the models of public relations perspective provides insights that current research strategies have not provided because they assume two‐way communication is the preferred form of communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Elizabeth Thomson

Discusses a research project which focuses on how decisions are made, rather than on who makes them, and in particular on the communication involved when all members of a…

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1006

Abstract

Discusses a research project which focuses on how decisions are made, rather than on who makes them, and in particular on the communication involved when all members of a family participate in buying a product; the family is the most important consumer buying unit in society. Outlines how respondents were recruited in northeast Scotland, with children between 13 and 15 targeted; the research consisted of a questionnaire, interviews, and a decision‐mapping tool in the form of posters. Distinguishes formal and informal communication modes, the former tending to prevail if the decision was urgent; two‐way communication or one‐way, ie parent to child; and communications pairs and subgroups, including parent communication, child communication, and parent and child communication. Concludes that the research families adopted varying degrees of formality and communication directions, and that parents and children often worked together rather than in opposition to each other, with the child focusing on the parent who was most interested in the product.

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Young Consumers, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Annelieke C. van den Berg and Joost W.M. Verhoeven

The rise of social media such as Facebook and Twitter has provided employees with means to share work-related information. Increasingly, social media governance policies…

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1976

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of social media such as Facebook and Twitter has provided employees with means to share work-related information. Increasingly, social media governance policies are implemented to negotiate the risks and opportunities of such behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to unveil the motivations behind managers’ attempts to govern these behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten communication managers of various organizations. Higgins’ regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997) was used to examine whether managers adopted a prevention or promotion focus to social media, and whether regulatory focus affected the measures taken toward social media governance.

Findings

Prevention and promotion foci were both observed among managers, and differed per communication model. Managers who employed dialogic models of communication were primarily promotion-focused and emphasized opportunities to improve stakeholder relations, while managers who employed one-way models were primarily prevention-focused and highlighted the risks of social media (e.g. the risk of employees publishing messages that contradict corporate communication and confuse stakeholders). Social media governance differed depending on regulatory focus. In the prevention scheme managers usually attempted to regain control by restricting social media to private use only, while in the promotion focus managers trained and facilitated employees for work-related social media use, to various extends.

Originality/value

By examining the interplay of regulatory focus, communication models and governance, this paper sheds light on the rationale behind social media governance policies that are implemented in organizations.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2000

Jerome C. Kuperman

The use of the Internet is becoming more prevalent all the time in the investor relations (IR) activities of firms. This paper explores how the Internet can be used and…

Abstract

The use of the Internet is becoming more prevalent all the time in the investor relations (IR) activities of firms. This paper explores how the Internet can be used and integrated into the existing IR activities of firms. It argues that the Internet is having a significant impact on IR practices, changing the specific techniques and activities associated with IR. As shown with several examples, the Internet can substantially change how a firm communicates with investment community stakeholders in terms of both its one‐way communication efforts directed at information dissemination and its two‐way communication efforts directed at interactive dialogue.

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Journal of Communication Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Alexander V. Laskin

The purpose of this paper is to review the historical development of the models/dimensions of public relations. The extensive criticism of the models and dimensions is…

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6535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the historical development of the models/dimensions of public relations. The extensive criticism of the models and dimensions is provided to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of the concept.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a critical literature review to understand the roots of the models, their empirical tests, the modifications applied to the models over time, and finally the proposed shift from models to dimensions of public relations.

Findings

The study concludes that the attempt to translate the public relations models into the dimensions failed because of a variety of conceptual and methodological flaws. Yet, the idea of developing dimensions of public relations is a viable and practical step in advancing public relations research; however, such dimensions must be continuous, dichotomous and measurable.

Originality/value

Models of public relations first became a dominant theoretical perspective in public relations only to virtually disappear from the research agenda later. This paper calls the attention back to the models/dimensions to revive the research in this area.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

C. Grill, G. Ahlborg and E.C. Lindgren

Leadership can positively affect the work environment and health. Communication and dialogue are an important part in leadership. Studies of how dialogue is valued and…

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1545

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership can positively affect the work environment and health. Communication and dialogue are an important part in leadership. Studies of how dialogue is valued and handled in first‐line leadership have not so far been found. The aim of this study is to develop a theoretical understanding of how first‐line leaders at hospitals in western Sweden value and handle dialogue in the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design was explorative and based on grounded theory. Data collection consisted of interviews and observations. A total of 11 first‐line leaders at two hospitals in western Sweden were chosen as informants, and for four of them observation was also used.

Findings

One core category emerged in the analysis: leaders' communicative actions, which could be strategically or understanding‐oriented, and experienced as equal or unequal and performed equitably or inequitably, within a power relationship. Four different types of communicative actions emerged: collaborative, nurturing, controlling, and confrontational. Leaders had strategies for creating arenas and relationships for dialogue, but dialogue could be constrained by external circumstances or ignorance of the frameworks needed to conduct and accomplish dialogue.

Practical implications

First‐line leaders should be offered guidance in understanding the consequences of consciously choosing and strengthening the communication component in leadership.

Originality/value

The positive valuation of dialogue was not always manifest in practical action. One significant consequence of not using dialogue was that information with impact on organisational efficiency and finances was not communicated upwards in the management system.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Michael Etter

Symmetric communication and relationship building are core principles of public relations, which have been highlighted for CSR communication. The purpose of this paper is…

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6489

Abstract

Purpose

Symmetric communication and relationship building are core principles of public relations, which have been highlighted for CSR communication. The purpose of this paper is to develop three different communication strategies for CSR communication in Twitter, of which each contributes differently to the ideals of symmetric communication and relationship building. The framework is then applied to analyze how companies use the micro-blogging service Twitter for CSR communication.

Design/methodology/approach

Social network analysis is used to identify the 30 most central corporate accounts in a CSR Twitter network.

Findings

From the social network analysis 40,000 tweets are extracted and manually coded. Anova is applied to investigate differences in the weighting of CSR topics between the different strategies.

Originality/value

So far not much is known about how social media, such as Twitter, contribute to the core principles of public relations, if companies use social media to foster symmetric communication and relationship management, or which CSR topics they address.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Poul Houman Andersen

Develops a model which integrates the development of marketing relationships with marketing communication practice. Especially within the realm of relationship marketing…

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18218

Abstract

Develops a model which integrates the development of marketing relationships with marketing communication practice. Especially within the realm of relationship marketing thinking, communication may be understood as an act of persuasion. Using three classical rhetorical elements, we may see this process as developing an understanding of the communicator’s intentions and qualities (ethos) and the communication climate (pathos), both of which are necessary for engaging in constructive dialogues with customers (logos). On this basis, the paper outlines a model for integrating practices of marketing communication with relationship building and illustrates the model using a case study from a Danish bank as a reflective device.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Kristin Fjeld and Mike Molesworth

This paper aims to promote better understanding of how the internet is used as part of crisis communication.

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4223

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to promote better understanding of how the internet is used as part of crisis communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The internet may be changing the way PR operates in a crisis. It has been reported that the web has a significant role in disseminating information and that many‐to‐many online communication allows organisations to achieve “excellent” communication. However, it has also been suggested that in practice there is a need for more flexibility that the “excellence” model suggests. This study reports on data collected from in‐depth interviews with ten senior PR‐practitioners in order to understand their experiences and attitudes.

Findings

A range of attitudes are identified, informed by recent experience. Although participants indicated knowledge of and preference for two‐way communication with stakeholders, in practice they found this impractical or undesirable. This, their preference for existing approaches, and ignorance about the internet informed their views about online communication. The result was that some regarded the internet as inferior in terms of its ability to achieve “traditional” tasks and because of its potential for undesirable dialogue. When the web was acknowledged as useful it tended to be considered as supplementary to existing approaches. There was little recognition of the need for online dialogue.

Originality/value

This paper articulates a range of positive and negative attitudes towards the use of the internet for crisis communication, based on the experiences of senior PR practitioners.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Carrie A. Blair, Katherine Helland and Bill Walton

Narcissism is often cited as a construct that is likely related to unethical leadership. Still, only a handful of empirical studies have examined the relationship between…

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7243

Abstract

Purpose

Narcissism is often cited as a construct that is likely related to unethical leadership. Still, only a handful of empirical studies have examined the relationship between narcissism and workgroup outcomes, and practically none have linked narcissism to leader behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to use narcissism scores to predict behaviors associated with unethical leadership in a controlled setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants completed a measure of narcissistic personality. Participants also completed an administrative assessment center (AC). Qualitative analysis was used to code the behaviors in the AC into dimensions associated with unethical leader behavior.

Findings

Narcissism was related to the display of unethical behaviors during the AC. Scores on the narcissism scale correlated positively with behaviors associated with unethical leadership, including one-way communication, control of power, insensitivity to others, an unrealistic assessment of the environment, manipulative communication, and pseudo-transformational behaviors.

Originality/value

This is one of only a few studies that demonstrate a relationship between narcissism and observed unethical “bad” leader behaviors. Quantifying this relationship suggests that measures of narcissism could be used in leadership selection. Quantifying this relationship could also be used by coaches as they work to improve leader behavior.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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