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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Alessandra Mazzei, Alfonsa Butera and Luca Quaratino

This paper aims to explore the role of employee engagement for competitiveness. In particular, the role of employee communication to create engaging workplaces.

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2140

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of employee engagement for competitiveness. In particular, the role of employee communication to create engaging workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Two field surveys were conducted to assess, which are the most relevant leverages that contribute to create engaging (or disengaging) workplaces in Italy: the first one on a statistical sample of large companies, the second one on a snowball sample of employees.

Findings

Italian companies often miss the opportunity to create engaging workplaces and to exploit the potential of employee communication to foster employee engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Further research could focus on a survey on a sample of managers and employees belonging to the same company.

Practical implications

Companies should pursue an inclusive relational approach, using employee communication appropriately.

Originality/value

The study develops and tests a model showing the linkages among managerial approaches and engaging workplace contexts and examines the role of employee communication to foster employee engagement.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Yeunjae Lee

With a focus on millennial employees, this study investigates how employees engage in two types of employees' communicative behaviors (ECBs), that is, their voluntary…

Abstract

Purpose

With a focus on millennial employees, this study investigates how employees engage in two types of employees' communicative behaviors (ECBs), that is, their voluntary communicative efforts to acquire and circulate tasks and managerial information (i.e. scouting) and to share and discuss positive and negative aspects of their organization with internal members (i.e. internal megaphoning). Through the lens of social exchange theory (SET) and symmetrical communication model, this study examines the effects of inclusive leadership and internal communication on active information behaviors of employees within their companies.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with fulltime millennial employees working across various industry sectors in the US.

Findings

Symmetrical internal communication influenced by inclusive leadership enhances employees' scouting behavior as well as positive internal megaphoning behavior. Positive and negative internal megaphoning with supervisors increases the scouting behavior of employees, whereas negative internal megaphoning with peers does not have a significant effect.

Originality/value

This study is among the first attempts to examine the effectiveness of leadership and strategic internal communication on millennial employees' diverse types of communicative behaviors.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Donnalyn Pompper

The time is right for renewed and updated attention to the relationship between public relations (PR) and human resources (HR) departments in the context of corporate…

Abstract

The time is right for renewed and updated attention to the relationship between public relations (PR) and human resources (HR) departments in the context of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability. For too long, conflict between the two practice areas has obscured opportunities for collaboration which benefits organizations and stakeholders. This chapter offers theoretical underpinnings for examining an interdepartmental, cross-unit working relationship between HR and PR – and advances a vision for why it is needed now.

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Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, and Ethical Public Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-585-6

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Jana Brockhaus, Laura Dicke, Patricia Hauck and Sophia Charlotte Volk

The aim of this chapter is to shed light on a growing phenomenon in communication practice: employees speaking voluntarily for, about or on behalf of their organization…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to shed light on a growing phenomenon in communication practice: employees speaking voluntarily for, about or on behalf of their organization, hereafter labelled as corporate ambassadors. The goal of this qualitative study is to analyze the role of corporate ambassadors within an organization and explore the perceived benefits and risks from three perspectives: the communication department, other departments such as marketing or human resources, and corporate ambassadors themselves. The research is based on an interdisciplinary literature review and 25 qualitative in-depth interviews with employees in one large, internationally operating German organization. By combining the theoretical and empirical insights, a conceptual framework that depicts the benefits (e.g., joy, increased trust, positive impact on reputation) and risks (e.g., work stress, lack of integration, loss of quality) of integrating corporate ambassadors into the overall communication of the organization was developed. In addition, this chapter suggests two typologies that help to distinguish between different roles of communication professionals and of corporate ambassadors. The contribution of this study is to lay a groundwork for further discussions about corporate ambassadors in the field of corporate communications. The chapter outlines directions for future research and implications for practice on how the framework can be applied in organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Sabine Einwiller, Christopher Ruppel and Julia Stranzl

Based on social exchange theory, the study examines the influence of informational and relational internal communication on cognitive and affective responses and job…

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1921

Abstract

Purpose

Based on social exchange theory, the study examines the influence of informational and relational internal communication on cognitive and affective responses and job engagement during organizational crises caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by means of an online survey among people working in organizations with a minimum of 10 employees (N = 1,033) and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results show that informational and relational communication as organizational resources have a significant but distinct influence on how employees support their employer during the crisis. While informational communication influences employees' acceptance of managerial decisions, relational communication exerts most influence on affective commitment, which is the strongest driver of job engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design, specific crisis situation and geographic location are limitations of the study.

Practical implications

Delivering relevant information to employees quickly and reliably is important. Yet, relationship-oriented communication that demonstrates appreciation and allows for participation has even stronger effects on job engagement, which is essential to mastering challenges arising from a crisis.

Social implications

During the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations demanded much from their employees. In exchange, organizations should provide the resources information, status and love (Foa and Foa, 1980) by means of internal crisis communication.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the role of different types of internal communication during organizational crises used to convey organizational resources, and it highlights the mediating role of acceptance and commitment to enhance employees' engagement at work.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Vibeke Thøis Madsen and Joost W. M. Verhoeven

The chapter develops a typology of eight different expected employee communication roles based on literature in public relations (PR), corporate communication and related…

Abstract

The chapter develops a typology of eight different expected employee communication roles based on literature in public relations (PR), corporate communication and related fields. As PR professionals are increasingly taking on a coaching and training role, and communication technology has made employees more visible and approachable, employees more and more take on active roles in the communication with external publics. While PR professionals’ roles are conceptualized fairly well, no framework exists that describes the many communication roles that employees play in contemporary organizations. In the chapter, it is found that employees externally (1) embody, (2) promote, and (3) defend the organization. In addition, employees use communication to (4) scout for information and insights about environmental changes, and (5) build and maintain relationships with stakeholders. Internally, employees use communication to (6) make sense of information, (7) initiate and stimulate innovation, and (8) criticize organizational behaviour and decisions. The typology highlights that employees increasingly fulfil the tactic communication roles as producers and executers of corporate communication as social media have made them more visible and approachable. The communication roles require considerable tactical skills and resources on the part of employees, which they may not always possess sufficiently. PR professionals can play a coaching role in terms of helping employees frame content and communicate in a manner appropriate for the organization, the context and the media. The chapter can help PR professionals and scholars understand the changed role of PR professionals, as well as the changed relationships between organizations and their environment, in the context of dissolving organizational boundaries.

Details

Big Ideas in Public Relations Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-508-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Laura L. Lemon and Nathan A. Towery

The present study investigates the nature of newly formed organizations and how internal communication influences these entities, where change is inherent. Organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study investigates the nature of newly formed organizations and how internal communication influences these entities, where change is inherent. Organizational life for government contractors is unusual in that employees experience routine changes to upper management, company values, goals and objectives every few years, which leads to the creation of a new consortium that is loosely coupled. Such research provides insight beyond the single-entity organization, which tends to dominate most public relations and internal communication literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the lack of research exploring consortia and internal communication to get beyond the homogeneous organization, an in-depth case study methodology was the most appropriate approach. A multi-site government contractor was chosen as the research site, relying on interviews and focus groups (n = 77) to collect data.

Findings

Effective internal communication practices are even more important for consortia, like government contractors, since employees of these organizations are guaranteed to experience frequent change. Therefore, communicating to the unknown audience, building trust in the absence of a prior connection, and preparing for the unintended consequences are imperative to navigating the complexity surrounding consortia forming and cultivating employee buy-in.

Originality/value

This study presents new, transferable knowledge of internal communication during consortia forming, where to be successful, internal communication needs anticipate the unintended consequences and develop a strategy around the uncertainty. Such strategy is about welcoming diverse voices and actively listening to their preferred needs. In addition, a definition of the unknown audience is provided.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Yeunjae Lee, Weiting Tao, Jo-Yun Queenie Li and Ruoyu Sun

This study aims to examine the effects of diversity-oriented leadership and strategic internal communication on employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior during a crisis…

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1797

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of diversity-oriented leadership and strategic internal communication on employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior during a crisis situation, coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in particular. Integrating knowledge sharing research with internal crisis communication literature as well as self-determination theory, the mediating roles of employees’ intrinsic needs satisfaction are also identified.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with 490 full-time employees in the USA across industry sectors during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Findings

Results suggest that diversity-oriented leadership contributes to transparent internal communication during a crisis and increases employees’ satisfaction of autonomy, competence and relatedness needs. Transparent internal communication also increases employees’ intrinsic needs satisfaction, which in turn fosters their job engagement and knowledge-sharing behavior during the crisis.

Originality/value

This study is one of the earliest studies to demonstrate the effectiveness of diversity-oriented leadership and strategic internal crisis communication in enhancing employees’ knowledge-sharing behavior, especially in the context of COVID-19.

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Tuan Trong Luu

Food waste behavior in the workplace or work-related gatherings has been less researched compared to that in household context. This study aims to bridge this gap through…

Abstract

Purpose

Food waste behavior in the workplace or work-related gatherings has been less researched compared to that in household context. This study aims to bridge this gap through unfolding how and when quality of food waste prevention communication mitigates food waste behavior among frontline employees in the hospitality workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in this research comprised employees from four- and five-star hotels operating in Vietnam.

Findings

The results lent credence to the dual mediation channels of moral attitudes toward food wasting and meaningfulness of food waste reduction for the impact of quality of food waste prevention communication on employees’ food waste reduction intention and their reduced food waste behavior. The contingency role of employees’ green role identity was marginally confirmed for the nexus between employees’ food waste reduction intention and their food waste behavior.

Originality/value

This inquiry advances the understanding of mechanisms underlying work-related food waste behavior among hospitality employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

David J. Therkelsen and Christina L. Fiebich

For every organisation there are at least several publics, the support of which is critical to organisational success. Many scholars and practitioners have argued for the…

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2538

Abstract

For every organisation there are at least several publics, the support of which is critical to organisational success. Many scholars and practitioners have argued for the primacy of the employee public, because of the effect of employee attitudes and behaviours on the experience of customers, and the productivity and innovation of the enterprise. Organisations that accept this premise often respond with traditional employee communication programmes and techniques. This paper accepts the primacy of employees in the hierarchy of publics, but argues especially for the role of the frontline supervisor as the key to effective communication with an engagement of the employee population. The paper is in part a macro review of literature on the employee public going back 50 years. It comments on the new social contract between organisations and their employees. It documents business results that are associated with an involved employee public. It asserts that employee loyalty lies primarily not to the organisation itself but with the work unity – especially the immediate supervisor. The authors also examine behaviour that increases or reduces employee trust, and describe the necessary skills and support systems that organisations must provide for their supervisors in order to make them superb communicators.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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