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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Alison Brammer

No Secrets: Guidance on developing and implementing multiagency policies and procedures to protect vulnerable adults from abuse was introduced as formal guidance in 2000…

Abstract

No Secrets: Guidance on developing and implementing multiagency policies and procedures to protect vulnerable adults from abuse was introduced as formal guidance in 2000 (Department of Health, 2000). In July 2009, the government published Safeguarding Adults: Report on the consultation on the review of the ‘No Secrete’ guidance (Department of Health, 2009), paving the way for revised guidance. In the 10 years since the introduction of No Secrets, we have seen many changes in the field of adult protection, including reconceptualisation of this area of practice in terms of ‘safeguarding’. As guidance, No Secrets operates within the context of current legislation and case law. This legal landscape has developed considerably over the last 10 years and it is apposite to review those changes; the effect of which must be integrated into any review. 2010 also marks 10 years since the implementation of the Human Rights Act 1998 (HM Government, 1998) and while its influence is clear in some developments, certain case law decisions have been disappointing.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Joanna Perry

This article considers the experiences of people with learning difficulties as victims of hate crime. It considers how the Crime and Disorder Act and No Secrets can help…

Abstract

This article considers the experiences of people with learning difficulties as victims of hate crime. It considers how the Crime and Disorder Act and No Secrets can help identify and prevent hate crime, and examines an example of good practice designed to produce an effective response.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Jill Manthorpe

The Department of Health's guidance on adult protection requires a response from local agencies. The Chair of a local multi‐agency group on adult protection discusses the…

Abstract

The Department of Health's guidance on adult protection requires a response from local agencies. The Chair of a local multi‐agency group on adult protection discusses the communication systems and resources required.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Dmitry Shlapentokh

Looks at the reasons for the collapse of both regimes and considers the importance of repression with these developments. Contrasts the methods of Imperial Russia with the…

Abstract

Looks at the reasons for the collapse of both regimes and considers the importance of repression with these developments. Contrasts the methods of Imperial Russia with the Bolsheviks looking at Court proceedings, prison conditions, education and propaganda in prison, exile and the secret police. Concludes that whilst social support is usually seen as essential for survival of a system, repression is not regarded as a positive element but can become the method for a system’s survival and stability.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2008

Stuart J.H. Graham

This chapter suggests that, while researchers and teachers of university technology transfer often think exclusively in terms of patents and the Bayh-Dole Act, we ought to…

Abstract

This chapter suggests that, while researchers and teachers of university technology transfer often think exclusively in terms of patents and the Bayh-Dole Act, we ought to adopt a more nuanced view of intellectual property rights (IPRs). In the text, I discuss the primary non-patent types of intellectual property (IP) protection, copyright, trademark, and trade secret, and argue that while patents are normally the “default” position when we think about protecting technologies and profiting from them, evidence suggests that patents are among the least important means of capturing value from innovation. Moreover, I suggest that while many consider that IP protections act as substitutes for one another, thinking about IPRs as complements is a more relevant approach to this issue. Adopting this more nuanced view better reflects reality and does a superior job of alerting our audiences to the opportunities available in the technology commercialization process.

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Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-532-1

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Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2020

Peter Buberis

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Australian Franchising Code of Conduct
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-168-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Hilary Brown

This paper provides a brief overview of abuse and protection, with a particular focus on women with learning disabilities. Women with learning disabilities face double…

Abstract

This paper provides a brief overview of abuse and protection, with a particular focus on women with learning disabilities. Women with learning disabilities face double oppression at the intersection of gender and disability, which makes them particularly vulnerable to sexual violence and exploitation. The paper reviews some useful models of abuse, to guide practice and frame further research. It also reflects guidance issued by the Department of Health in 2000 (No Secrets), which has resulted in a coherent framework for use throughout local authorities and other statutory agencies to address abuse against all vulnerable adults.

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Stephen Denning

The author observes that as customer-focused innovation takes hold in more and more industries, the result is a business environment that is coming to be known as “the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The author observes that as customer-focused innovation takes hold in more and more industries, the result is a business environment that is coming to be known as “the Creative Economy,” an operating arena with unique “physics” that successful practitioners are beginning to be able to describe.

Design/methodology/approach

The author interprets the insights of both a successful serial entrepreneur and cutting-edge academics to shed fresh light on how to distinguish between real and false opportunities and threats in the new operating environment of the Creative Economy.

Findings

The author examines serial entrepreneur Peter Thiel’s seven – sometimes surprising – tools for implementing market-making innovation in the Creative Economy. They are, “the seven questions that every market-creating business must answer.”

Practical implications

A key insight of the article is that “All truly successful market-creating firms are de facto monopolies.”

Originality/value

For both practitioners and academics, the article provides a guide to assessing market-making innovations and connects the experience of successful entrepreneurs with new conceptual models by thought leaders like John P. Kotter and Clayton Christensen.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Working with Older People, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Desmond Rea

States that Northern Ireland continues to be governed by Direct Rule from Westminster, with the Government in the Republic of Ireland able to influence that rule through…

Abstract

States that Northern Ireland continues to be governed by Direct Rule from Westminster, with the Government in the Republic of Ireland able to influence that rule through the Anglo‐Irish Conference and the Secretariat located in Belfast. There are many questions emerging from the recent political history of Northern Ireland: the political implications of continued Direct Rule, the implications of any UK government withdrawal and the economic consequences of peace. The answers to many of the questions posed by its recent political history depends on the future political management of Northern Ireland.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 23 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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