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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2019

Nikhilesh Dholakia

The purpose of this paper is to trace the personal and intellectual evolution of the author via an autobiographic approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the personal and intellectual evolution of the author via an autobiographic approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal, reflective, interpretive, historical narrative.

Findings

For the author, the writing of this paper opened new and reflective windows on personal and intellectual evolution, and similar effects may happen with some of the readers.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the critical directions suggested herein could possibly inspire innovative critical marketing work.

Practical implications

There may be some insights on how to blend observations of the world at large with critical theories gleaned from the literature.

Social implications

The paper offers reflections of the unequal, unjust state of the world, and this could inspire others to seek innovative ameliorative pathways.

Originality/value

As an autobiographical narrative, this paper – by definition – is original and unique.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2020

Nikhilesh Dholakia, Aras Ozgun and Deniz Atik

This paper aims to uncover links, overlaps and influence flows across two seemingly unrelated historical processes – the broadening of the marketing concept and the rapid…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover links, overlaps and influence flows across two seemingly unrelated historical processes – the broadening of the marketing concept and the rapid rise of neoliberal ideology, and associated economic and social policies.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical examination of the pivotal points in marketing thought, especially since 1960s and 1970s, is juxtaposed with the historical rise of neoliberalism to uncover linkages between marketing and neoliberalism, with a particular reference to Foucault’s analysis of the neoliberal transgression of classical liberalism.

Findings

While noble intentions were behind the broadening of the concept of marketing, the implicit assumptions reinforced neoliberal ideology and policies that led to rapid rise in inequality and to disastrous financial and economic crises.

Research limitations/implications

This study, relying on extensive interdisciplinary theorizing, could benefit from empirical and practical extensions.

Practical implications

Globally pervasive marketing practices – based on the broadening of the marketing concept – have become imbricated in contemporary spiraling crises. To escape such spirals, radical rethinking of marketing theories and practices is required.

Social implications

To reorient away from serving only the interests of centralized capital and to serve the needs of people the world over, marketing thought and practice need to reorient to innovative ideas that transcend the broadened and generic marketing concepts.

Originality/value

The paper develops the linkages between marketing theory and practices since the late 1960s and the neoliberal ideology politics and policies, with roots in the 1920s, that rose to prominence in the 1970s. A key contribution is an exploration of, in a marketing context, Foucault’s analysis of the neoliberal eclipsing of classical liberalism.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Nikhilesh Dholakia and A. Fuat Firat

The purpose of this paper is not to present a crystal ball, but to outline the conceptual strands – some already evident, others only dimly perceivable in emergent forms …

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is not to present a crystal ball, but to outline the conceptual strands – some already evident, others only dimly perceivable in emergent forms – that might drive the coming transformations and to weave the strands into a preliminary framework. The stance (and the political perspective) of the paper is informed by critical marketing studies (Tadajewski, 2010), the subfield of marketing that is vibrant in Europe but not yet well developed in other regions of the world.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theoretical contribution, relying on discursive analysis.

Findings

Before an era of full and all-pervasive automation arrives, there will be a decades-long transitional stage of heteromation. In the heteromation, machines and humans will have to coexist adaptively. The spheres of production and consumption will be affected radically by the patterns of people-machine interactions, including coexistence, cooperation, adaptation, adjustments and conflicts. As the connective tissue between the spheres of production and consumption, marketing would also undergo major transformations in the age of heteromation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper lays out the grounding concepts useful for how heteromation and the subsequent era of full automation could impact organizations and markets. It provides the stepping-stone for further work on how marketing could, would or should transform in relation to the challenges of heteromation and automation.

Practical implications

The paper offers some guideposts for public policymakers, public intellectuals and thought leaders and social activists. It also points to action options for visionary corporate leaders and for researchers wishing to explore the heteromation–automation futures from critical-social perspectives.

Originality/value

Using the concept of heteromation, this paper presents hitherto unexplored and critical implications of potentially epochal transformations for marketing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2018

Rohit Varman and Nikhilesh Dholakia

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172

Abstract

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Bipul Kumar and Nikhilesh Dholakia

This study explores enablers that firms could use to motivate consumers toward responsible consumption behavior. Completing the loop of responsible consumption – linking…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores enablers that firms could use to motivate consumers toward responsible consumption behavior. Completing the loop of responsible consumption – linking firms and consumers –helps firms to attain responsible consumption targets as part of the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses netnography as the qualitative research methodology.

Findings

The important enablers of responsible consumption behavior are choice editing, design intervention, addressing consumers' environmental identity, brand assurance, promoting innovation mindset and consumer empowerment – at the level of consumers and at the crosslevel of interaction between firms and consumers. Such enablers can help the firms in nudging their consumers toward responsible consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Using the lens of the expectancy–value theory of achievement motivation, this study extends the theoretical domain of responsible consumption.

Practical implications

The enablers of responsible consumption behaviors found here serve as a useful guide for the strategies to attain the SDGs.

Social implications

The SDG goal 12 of responsible consumption is the focus of this study. The entire fabric of responsible consumption is woven around anthropocentric views, and hence the findings of this study have clear social implications.

Originality/value

This is a first study to explore how firms can facilitate consumers to consume responsibly, to attain the SDGs. This is also one of the first studies on responsible consumption, using netnography as the research methodology. Additionally, it also extends the applicability of the expectancy–value theory of achievement motivation to the context of responsible consumption behavior.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Douglas N. Hales, Y.T. Chang, Jasmine Siu Lee Lam, Olivier Desplebin, Nikhilesh Dholakia and Adel Al-Wugayan

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test a new theory called the balanced theory of port competitiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test a new theory called the balanced theory of port competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from multiple respondents in 72 of the largest container ports. The instrument was translated into English, Simplified Chinese, Korean, and French. The data were collected through online and paper-based surveys. The data were analyzed using analytical hierarchy process.

Findings

The theory was shown to explain the behavior of port stakeholders in improving competitiveness by balancing the need to attract new customers with that of attracting new investors when making decisions, which can often be contradictory. The analysis showed significant effects for the five variables of volume competitiveness (VC) and the five variables of investment competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in that it only tested the balanced theory on the largest container ports. The decisions by port managers may differ at smaller ports or those that do not handle containers.

Practical implications

Port stakeholders now have a ten-variable model of the factors needed to attract new customers and investors. These variables, and their tradeoffs, can evaluate the impact of managerial decisions on port competitiveness.

Originality/value

This study informs the literature by being the first to test a new theory that explains a greater level of port stakeholder behavior when improving competitiveness. Prior to this study, VC and investor competitiveness had only been studied separately, although they were related in practice.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Mark Tadajewski and D.G. Brian Jones

Abstract

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Ruby Roy Dholakia

In a very personal reflection, this paper aims to trace the academic trajectory of a female marketing academic in a very male-dominated discipline. It also highlights the…

Abstract

Purpose

In a very personal reflection, this paper aims to trace the academic trajectory of a female marketing academic in a very male-dominated discipline. It also highlights the struggle balancing work and family, as well as protecting an immigrant identity in a foreign culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the period and unique conditions of the author’s academic journey, this highly personal retrospective account is based on recall of significant events that have shaped my singular experience. It attempts to capture the experience of an immigrant female novice navigating not only a foreign culture but also a very male-dominant discipline.

Findings

While times have changed and gender barriers are lower today, challenges remain. In addition, the set of choices faced by women with partners in the same discipline differ significantly and complicate the family-work balance decisions. There is no one set of path that can be followed.

Practical implications

While there is a professional cost to deviating from the mainstream, pursuing alternatives to the dominant topics is vital to advancing the health and relevance of the marketing discipline. The relationships between marketing and development have been an important topic for me; however, these macromarketing topics continue to be neglected. Given the current socio-economic-political conditions globally, perhaps future marketing scholars will devote greater attention to these topics.

Originality/value

This is purely the author’s personal reflection of a journey that began accidentally. It also occurred in the 1970s when women were rare in the business world, particularly business academia. It offers a retrospective comparison to male peers who, aside from their individual talents and history (Belk, 2017; Firat, 2014; Holbrook, 2017), were achieving their professional goals at a similar period. It also provides some historical context that can be compared to experiences of other female pioneers in marketing academia and marketing practice (Bolton, 2017; Tadajewski and Maclaran, 2013; Zeithaml, 2017).

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Nikhilesh Dholakia and Robert W. Nason

Develops an approach to the discipline of macro‐marketing as a means for discussion. Approaches the task of agenda by considering: scope and domain of macro‐marketing;…

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1344

Abstract

Develops an approach to the discipline of macro‐marketing as a means for discussion. Approaches the task of agenda by considering: scope and domain of macro‐marketing; classification of research issues at a general level; and major macro‐marketing issues facing different groups in various developed and underdeveloped countries. Concludes that the promise of macro‐marketing as an emergent field is a function of the research directions this field takes; suggests, further, that these directions are a product of social processes and therefore not a matter of prescription or infallible predictions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Nikhilesh Dholakia and Ruby R. Dholakia

Compares the marketing functions of social enterprises with that of private enterprise, and discusses the management problems involved in the selection and implementation…

Abstract

Compares the marketing functions of social enterprises with that of private enterprise, and discusses the management problems involved in the selection and implementation of a social enterprise strategy. Purports that the marketing function in a social enterprise, as in other types of enterprise, is concerned with decisions relating to the level, composition, and distribution of the output. Recognises that marketing mix decisions – e.g. product, price, place, and promotional decision – provide one specific way of determining the output enterprise. Concludes that the marketing planning problem, in a social enterprise, is a complex one, and success depends on the twin elements of operating flexibility and consumer participation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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