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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Kate Noble and Nicola Wallis

The authors draw on Howard and Thomas-Hughes' (2020) framework for quality assessment of co-produced research, to interrogate our assumptions and processes and to reflect on our…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors draw on Howard and Thomas-Hughes' (2020) framework for quality assessment of co-produced research, to interrogate our assumptions and processes and to reflect on our project. They consider if they achieved our planned outcomes around developing practice, enabling a range of voices and perspectives within their research, and enacting change within the university museum.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ early years residency programme explores the potential of collaborations with community groups to transform knowledge and practice through action research. As museum educators, the authors find synergy between the participatory pedagogies underpinning their practice and the co-construction of knowledge within action research. Both are committed to enabling diverse interpretations within a collective and supportive framework. Within their project, practitioners from the museum and playgroup worked collaboratively to collect video footage, photos, children's artwork and reflective journals and memos.

Findings

The process of action, observation and reflection revealed much about the authors’ different perspectives and they found variations in both pedagogy and practice. Although the authors had a shared commitment to providing high quality, memorable, exciting opportunities for the children, the exploratory nature of the project meant that they did not agree what these experiences might look like in advance, and so they had different understandings of what they saw.

Research limitations/implications

Although the authors’ methodological framework was designed to make their research collaborative, structural challenges and the contexts of the art museum and university reinforced long established hierarchies. While some felt supported by the research process and the prestige of working with a university museum to gain legitimacy for their practice, others were disempowered by these same structures. The authors consider their obligations as practitioner-researchers to become aware of the role they play in maintaining, as well as challenging, hierarchies and assumptions.

Originality/value

Young children in museums is a growing area of study and this practitioner-led action research project develop a new strand of enquiry within this field. Through this research the authors can collaborate with community partners to record, analyse and make visible the many different ways in which young children experience the museum. As research led institutions, university museums are ideally placed to develop research in partnership with local public bodies and community groups. However, future work in this area would benefit from a more explicit consideration of the constraints implicit within the institutions within which they all operate.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Reuben Olugbenga Ayeleke, Nicola Henri North, Annette Dunham and Katharine Ann Wallis

Training to improve health management and leadership competence is recommended. However, there is limited evidence showing the impact of training on competence. The purpose of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Training to improve health management and leadership competence is recommended. However, there is limited evidence showing the impact of training on competence. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence for the impact of training and professional development on health management and leadership competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted using a mixed-methods design. Studies using qualitative, quantitative or mixed-methods design were included. The following electronic databases were searched to October 2018: CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, NEDLINE and PsycINFO. Study eligibility and methodological quality were assessed independently by two review authors. Data from qualitative studies were synthesised using thematic analysis. For quantitative studies, odds ratio (OR) or mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each intervention. Where appropriate, qualitative and quantitative data were integrated into a single synthesis using Bayesian methods.

Findings

In total, 19 studies were identified for inclusion in the review. Training and professional development interventions using flexible, multiple training techniques tailored to organisational contexts can improve individual competence and performance. Such training is typified by a leadership development programme. There was insufficient evidence to determine the effects of interventions on organisational performance.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic review evaluating the impact of training and professional development interventions on health management and leadership competence.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 February 2024

Veronica Scuotto, Deniz Karagöz, Nicola Farronato and Ilan Alon

Environmental knowledge management (EKM) has been studied mainly owing to the increasing awareness of environmental issues. Such issues have generated a warning in the tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental knowledge management (EKM) has been studied mainly owing to the increasing awareness of environmental issues. Such issues have generated a warning in the tourism industry that has stimulated a new wave of research on EKM. EKM forges landscape characteristics and so destination image. In turn, EKM sounds affecting tourism destination which calls for destination personality which shows a research context less explored. From a knowledge management perspective, The present research aims to investigate on EKM to understand how it leverages tourists' and destination personality.

Design/methodology/approach

With the intent of exploring EKM, the research uses a quantitative analysis on a sample of 2,222 young Chinese tourists. In this context, EKM is linked with destination’s personality and tourists’ personalities, their satisfaction with the destination and their behavioral intentions.

Findings

By SPSS regression model, EKM and destination personality are positively linked. This positive relationship is also reflected on destination personality and destination satisfaction, behavioral intention.

Originality/value

The authors’ original contribution to the knowledge management literature extends the new wave of research on EKM. The research also proves the need to make a close collaboration between tourists, the local community and marketers. Marketers need to pay more attention to what tourists want to do and see in the place visited. In a nutshell, there is the need of enforcing and promoting EKM.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2022

Rosa Esteban-Arrea and Nicolas Garcia-Torea

This paper aims to study companies’ strategic responses to regulative institutional pressures on sustainability reporting. Particularly, it investigates the role of multiple…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study companies’ strategic responses to regulative institutional pressures on sustainability reporting. Particularly, it investigates the role of multiple stakeholder demands in shaping corporate responses to Law 11/2018 that transposes the EU Non-Financial Reporting Directive in Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

Informed by Oliver’s framework, the study analyzes the 2018 non-financial information of Spanish listed companies mandated to report under Law 11/2018 to explore the relationship between adopting a particular strategic response and companies’ stakeholder configuration.

Findings

Companies facing multiple stakeholder pressures tend to use a compromise strategy favoring the disclosure of relevant topics to a specific stakeholder type. Specifically, environmentalists are the most influential stakeholder in determining the coverage of sustainability topics to the detriment of other stakeholders when companies suffer from regulatory pressures.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to disentangling the factors determining how companies respond to sustainability reporting regulation. Future research could perform longitudinal and large multinational analyses to study the evolutionary process of corporate responses.

Practical implications

The study is relevant to managers and policymakers as it highlights that sustainability reporting regulation should promote the coverage of relevant topics to less influential stakeholders.

Social implications

The study explores the extent to which current sustainability reporting regulation can increase transparency on sustainability issues for all stakeholders.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous literature exploring the extent to which firms comply with regulation, the study considers that companies can respond more actively to mandatory sustainability reporting requirements.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2023

Driselda P. Sánchez-Aguirre and Ilia Alvarado-Sizzo

The purpose of this paper is to compare the imaginaries of Generation Z inhabitants of heritage cities in the Mexican Bajio regarding their city of residence and the institutional…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the imaginaries of Generation Z inhabitants of heritage cities in the Mexican Bajio regarding their city of residence and the institutional imaginary of urban tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 186 students from five Mexican heritage cities completed an online questionnaire and participated in focus groups. The authors used a mixed approach with qualitative analysis for open-ended responses and a Kruskal Wallis test to measure attitudes towards tourism and its relationship to place attachment and intangible cultural heritage identification.

Findings

The results showed a strong relationship between place attachment and perception of tourism, but attitudes towards tourism varied among the cities, and San Juan del Río was an outlier. Among the categories of intangible cultural heritage, oral traditions showed the least agreement between youth and institutional imaginaries.

Originality/value

Few studies have considered Mexican youth and their imagery of the small/medium-sized city in which they live when it is promoted as an urban tourist destination.

Propósito

Comparar los imaginarios de los habitantes de la Generación Z de las Ciudades Patrimonio del Bajío mexicano respecto a su ciudad de residencia y el imaginario institucional del turismo urbano.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Aplicamos un cuestionario a 186 estudiantes de cinco ciudades patrimonio mexicanas quienes además, participaron en grupos focales. Se utilizó un enfoque mixto con análisis cualitativo para las respuestas abiertas y una prueba de Kruskal Wallis para medir las actitudes hacia el turismo y su relación con el apego al lugar y la identificación del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial.

Resultados

Los resultados mostraron una fuerte relación entre el apego al lugar y la percepción del turismo, pero las actitudes hacia el turismo variaron entre las ciudades siendo San Juan del Río un caso atípico. Entre las categorías del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial, las tradiciones orales mostraron la menor concordancia entre los jóvenes y los imaginarios turísticos institucionales.

Originalidad

Pocos estudios han considerado el imaginario de jóvenes mexicanos con respecto a ciudades pequeñas-medianas en las que viven, cuando éstas se promueven como destinos turísticos urbanos

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Nicola Brown, Jenny Burbage and Joanna Wakefield-Scurr

Previous research suggests that many active females are not engaging in sports bra use, despite the positive health benefits. The aim of this study was to establish and compare…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research suggests that many active females are not engaging in sports bra use, despite the positive health benefits. The aim of this study was to establish and compare sports bra use, preferences and bra fit issues for exercising females in some of the largest and most diverse global underwear markets (the US, the UK and China).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey covering activity levels, sports bra use and preferences, bra issues and demographics was administered via Qualtrics and completed by 3,147 physically active females (aged ≥ 18 years) from the US (n = 1,060), UK (n = 1,050) and China (n = 1,037).

Findings

In general, participants were 25–29 years, 121 to 140 pounds, 34B bra size and pre-menopausal. “I cannot find the right sports bra” was the most frequent breast barrier to exercise (25.4%). Three-quarters of women wore a sports bra during exercise, with significantly higher use in China (83.9%), compared to the UK (67.2%). A third of all participants reported sports bra shoulder straps “digging into the skin”. Sports bra preferences were: compression sports bras with a racer back, wide straps and thick straps in the US and the UK; thin straps in China and adjustable straps and underband, no wire and maximum breast coverage in the US and the UK, including nipple concealment and with padded/moulded cups.

Originality/value

Information provided on differences in sports bra use, preferences and bra issues across three major global markets could be utilised by brands and manufacturers to optimise bra marketing and fit education initiatives and inform future sports bra design and distribution strategies.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2022

Paraskevi El Skarpa and Emmanouel Garoufallou

In the digital era individuals are overwhelmed by huge amount of readily available information. The information provided at the time of COVID-19 crisis is increasingly available…

Abstract

Purpose

In the digital era individuals are overwhelmed by huge amount of readily available information. The information provided at the time of COVID-19 crisis is increasingly available. The purpose of this paper was to investigate individuals’ perceived feelings due to the plethora of information during COVID-19 pandemic in Greece in Spring 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted through a Web-based questionnaire survey posted on the Google Forms platform. The questionnaire consisted of closed-ended, seven-point Likert-scale questions. The data collected were subjected to a principal component analysis. The retained principal components (PCs) were subjected to statistical analysis between genders and among age groups and professional status with the nonparametric criteria Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis.

Findings

Responses by 776 individuals were obtained. Seventeen original variables from the questionnaire were summarized into three PCs that explained the 71.7% of total variance: “affective disorders,” “uncertainty issues and inaccurate information worries” and “satisfaction and optimism.” Participants partly agree that the received amount of information on the disease caused them feelings of uncertainty about the future and worries about relatives’ lives, but also satisfaction with developments in the country. Females seem to experience stronger perceived feelings of “affective disorders” (p < 0.001) and reported higher degree of agreement about “uncertainty issues and inaccurate information worries.”

Originality/value

The recorded feelings caused by the volume of available information may have forced people accept the necessary precautionary behavioral changes that had contributed to the Greek success in preventing spread of the disease in Spring 2020.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 73 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2017

Nicola Pless, Filomena Sabatella and Thomas Maak

Recent years have brought significant advances in research on behavioral ethics. However, research on ethical decision making is still in a nascent stage. Our objective in this…

Abstract

Recent years have brought significant advances in research on behavioral ethics. However, research on ethical decision making is still in a nascent stage. Our objective in this paper is twofold: First, we argue that the practice of mindfulness may have significant positive effects on ethical decision making in organizations. More specifically, we will discuss the benefits of “reperceiving” – a meta-mechanism in the practice of mindfulness for ethical decision making and we provide an overview of mindfulness research pertaining to ethical decision making. Subsequently, we explore areas in which neuroscience research may inform research on ethics in organizations. We conclude that both neuroscience and mindfulness offer considerable promise to the field of ethical decision making.

Details

Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-416-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 June 2023

M.M. Mohamed Mufassirin, M.I. Rifkhan Ahamed, M.S. Mohamed Hisam and Mansoor Mohamed Fazil

Restrictions imposed on freedom of movement and interaction with others due to the COVID-19 pandemic have had the effect of causing many people, especially students, to become…

Abstract

Purpose

Restrictions imposed on freedom of movement and interaction with others due to the COVID-19 pandemic have had the effect of causing many people, especially students, to become addicted to social media. This study aims to investigate the effect of social media addiction on the academic performance of Sri Lankan government university students during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sampling technique was used to conduct a quantitative cross-sectional survey. The survey involved 570 respondents from nine state universities in Sri Lanka. The raw data from the completed questionnaires were coded and processed using SPSS for descriptive and inferential statistical analysis.

Findings

The findings of this study indicated that the overall time spent on social networking increased dramatically during COVID-19. Based on the results, this study found that there was no association between the time spent on social media and the academic performance of students before COVID-19 came on the scene. However, a significant association was found between the time spent on social media and students’ performance during the pandemic. The authors concluded that overblown social media use, leading to addiction, significantly negatively affects academic performance.

Originality/value

This study helps to understand the impact of social media use on the academic performance of students during COVID-19. Restrictions imposed by COVID-19 have changed the typical lifestyle of the students. Therefore, social media usage should be reassessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings of the study will comprise these new insights, and they may well show how to adapt social media to contribute to academic work in meaningful ways.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2023

Oscar Valdemar De la Torre-Torres, María Isabel Martínez Torre-Enciso, María de la Cruz Del Río-Rama and José Álvarez-García

In this paper, the authors tested if promoting the workforce's happiness (through high performance work policies or HPWP) and well-being in European Public companies relates to…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors tested if promoting the workforce's happiness (through high performance work policies or HPWP) and well-being in European Public companies relates to their profitability (return on equity, ROE), market risk (beta) and stock price return. Also, the authors tested if investors have a performance benefit if they buy a portfolio screened with companies with HPWP.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors proxied the quality of the HPWP efforts in the first method with the Refinitiv workforce score. They used this data in an unbalanced panel of eastern, western, northern and southern Europe companies from 2011 to 2022. The panel data also included the ROE, the market risk (beta) and the stock price return of these companies. The authors estimated the corresponding regressions with the panel data and tested the relationship between the workforce score and these three variables. In a second method, they simulated the weekly performance of a portfolio that invested only in European companies with high standards in their HPWP and compared its performance against a conventional market portfolio (with no HPWP screening).

Findings

In the first method, the authors found no significant relationship between the workforce score and the ROE, beta, or stock price return in the panel regression, controlling for random effects. In the second one, they found no over or underperformance in the HPWP portfolio against the European market one in the second method.

Practical implications

The results suggest that there is no risk or cost for European Public companies and investors alike if they promote, with better HPWP, the happiness and well-being of their workforce. The findings suggest that if European companies promote HPWP, there will be no adverse impact on their profits, market risk, or stock price performance. Also, investors will not lose performance (against a conventional market portfolio) if they screen their portfolios with this type of workforce-friendly companies.

Originality/value

Increase the scarce literature on the test of the workforce score with company profitability (ROE), stock market price variation and stock market risk level.

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