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1 – 10 of 67
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Jill Bradshaw, Nick Gore and Cathy Darvell

Bowring et al. describe ways of using the Behavior Problems Inventory – Short Form, illustrating how to use clinical norms to evaluate change. This commentary focuses on…

Abstract

Purpose

Bowring et al. describe ways of using the Behavior Problems Inventory – Short Form, illustrating how to use clinical norms to evaluate change. This commentary focuses on the importance of considering information gained directly from people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) during assessment. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot project involved interviews with four children with IDD. A Talking Mats® (TM) framework was used to gather children’s views regarding challenging behaviours (CBs) and variables relevant to a functional behavioural assessment, such as things they found to be reinforcing, things that set the occasion for CB and things that helped prevent this.

Findings

The children were able to provide information and insight into several areas that are influential in the maintenance of behaviour that challenges. Some of this information may not have been obtainable from other sources or informants using traditional assessment methods alone.

Originality/value

Gathering the views of people with IDD is important. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (United Nations, 2009) states that people have the right to be heard. Many people with IDD have difficulties communicating. A TM framework is one method by which people may be able to express their views. Taking the views of the individual into account during the process of gathering information about behaviours that challenge should lead to greater understanding of the functions of any behaviours and therefore to more targeted, acceptable and effective forms of support.

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Heather Dilks-Hopper, Chloe Jacobs, Catherine Sholl, Caroline Falconer and Nick Gore

The purpose of this paper is to present an update on the Ealing Intensive Therapeutic and Short Breaks Service (ITSBS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an update on the Ealing Intensive Therapeutic and Short Breaks Service (ITSBS).

Design/methodology/approach

The challenges the service has faced are reviewed, including the service’s response to those challenges. Also provided is a more detailed analysis of the outcomes of the service.

Findings

The ITSBS continues to succeed in supporting young people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour to stay at home with their families.

Originality/value

Despite considerable challenges and adaptations to the model, the ITSBS is still achieving successful outcomes for vulnerable young people and is considered nationally to be a best-practice model. Few prior articles have provided an account of how innovative service models are maintained and evolve over time.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Louise D. Denne, Nick J. Gore, J. Carl Hughes, Sandy Toogood, Edwin Jones and Freddy Jackson Brown

There is an apparent disconnect between the understanding of best practice and service delivery in the support of people with learning disabilities at risk of behaviours…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an apparent disconnect between the understanding of best practice and service delivery in the support of people with learning disabilities at risk of behaviours that challenge. We suggest, is a problem of implementation. The purpose of this paper is to explore reasons why this might be the case: a failure to recognise the collective works of successive generations of research and practice; and a failure to address the macro-systems involved and systems changes needed to support implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the consensus that exists in respect of best practice. Drawing upon ideas from implementation science the paper highlights the complexities involved in the implementation of all evidence-based practices and uses this as a framework to propose ways in which an infrastructure that facilitates the delivery of services in the learning disabilities field might be built.

Findings

This paper highlights core recommended practices that have been consistent over time and across sources and identifies the systems involved in the implementation process. This paper demonstrates that many of the necessary building blocks of implementation already exist and suggests areas that are yet to be addressed. Critically, the paper highlights the importance of, and the part that all systems need to play in the process.

Originality/value

In the absence of any generalised implementation frameworks of evidence-based practice in the learning disabilities field, the paper suggests that the findings may provide the basis for understanding how the gap that exists between best practice and service delivery in the support of people with a learning disability at risk of behaviours that challenge might be closed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Serena Rose Louisa Tomlinson, Peter McGill, Nick Gore and Jessie Humphreys

Little is known about the characteristics of residential educational settings for young people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) in England. Previous…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the characteristics of residential educational settings for young people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) in England. Previous research has focussed on the characteristics and experiences of the young people attending such settings rather than the setting itself; therefore, an overview of national provision is needed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger project, data were collected for all residential schools and colleges in England. Data relate to settings offering residential provision for at least 4 nights per week for 30 weeks per year, either at the school/college itself, or in an associated residential home. Due to the remit of the main project, settings offering placements only to young people aged under 16 were excluded. Data were collected from a range of sources, including school/college websites, Ofsted and Department for Education resources, and liaison directly with the setting.

Findings

In total, 342 residential educational settings were identified with 57 of these offering post-16 provisions only. A range of data is presented about these settings, including location, placement numbers and types available, age range catered for, special educational needs categories registered for, governance arrangements (e.g. LA maintained, privately owned, and charitable organisation), and Ofsted educational ratings.

Originality/value

These data provide a national overview of residential educational settings for young people with IDD. This enables a clearer picture of the location and type of provision offered and allows comparisons both within and between areas.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Eric Emerson

– The purpose of this paper is to comment on “Early intervention for children with learning disabilities: making use of what we know.”

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to comment on “Early intervention for children with learning disabilities: making use of what we know.”

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative review and discussion.

Findings

The arguments presented by Nick Gore, Richard Hastings and Serena Brady are fully consistent with the broader scientific literature on prevention and the required future direction of English health policy.

Originality value

This commentary places the arguments made by Gore et al. in a broader scientific and policy context.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2009

Nick Gore and David Dawson

The study investigated the frequency of adverse life events and prevalence of MD recorded for clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) in a medium secure unit, using…

Abstract

The study investigated the frequency of adverse life events and prevalence of MD recorded for clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) in a medium secure unit, using data from an electronic patient record (EPR) system. Prevalence of MD was calculated on the basis of ICD‐10 diagnoses and a 38‐item checklist was developed to investigate adverse/traumatic life events for sub‐samples with and without MD. High rates of MD were reported overall, particularly of schizotypal and delusional disorders and disorders of personality. Adverse life events including abuse, bereavement and relationship difficulties had been documented by clinicians. The overall number of recorded events was significantly higher for clients diagnosed with a MD. Associations between MD and life events have been reported previously, but not in a forensic ID population. The study contributes to a growing body of literature highlighting the relationship between life events and mental health in people with ID, offering further information for service development and clinical practice.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Nick Gore

43

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Nick Gore

26

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Nick Gore, Richard Hastings and Serena Brady

– The purpose of this paper is to present a rationale for increasing initiatives for early intervention of emotional and behaviour difficulties.

2601

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a rationale for increasing initiatives for early intervention of emotional and behaviour difficulties.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on existing literature regarding rates of emotional and behavioural difficulties together with risk factors and processes related to the development of such difficulties.

Findings

Rates of emotional and behavioural difficulties amongst children with learning and developmental difficulties are high. A combination of factors relating to the child, the family system, and wider social contexts is likely to account for this.

Research limitations/implications

Increased attempts to provide early intervention to children with learning and developmental disabilities together with their families are warranted. Recommendations are made regarding how the development of such supports might best be taken forward.

Originality/value

Whilst drawing on pre-existing literature, the value of this paper is the way in which this has been drawn together to provide an overview of risk and development of behavioural and other difficulties amongst children with learning/developmental disabilities.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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