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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Jie Liang and Nan Mei

The purpose of this paper is to examine the following research question in partner selection decisions in business-to-business strategic partnerships/collaborations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the following research question in partner selection decisions in business-to-business strategic partnerships/collaborations literature: How do inertia and uncertainty affect partner selection? Explicitly, the paper analyzes how inertia of previous alliance selection routines and uncertainty of entire market movement shape firms’ preferences regarding exploratory partner selection (i.e. selecting new partners who never collaborate with the focal firm).

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded on inter-firm partnerships, partner selection and network theory literature, the study empirically tests a fine-grained sample of 511 open-end funds initiated by 61 fund management firms in China. To do so, it runs Tobit regression for main analysis and applies a variety of sensitivity analyses to check the robustness.

Findings

Results show that inertia in previous partner selection has a negative effect on exploration. Importantly, these inertial forces impact domestic firms but not international firms. Market uncertainty also affects exploratory partner selection: short-term market uncertainty encourages exploration, whereas long-term uncertainty inhibits it. These effects also depend on firms’ type: long-term market uncertainty has a negative effect on exploration for international firms but not for domestic firms. Both types of firms exhibit a stronger tendency toward exploration when they encounter short-term uncertainty. However, this inclination is stronger in international firms.

Originality/value

Earlier research has examined how inertia affects exploitation but largely overlooked its effect on exploration. A critical examination of firm and environment level factors provides a deeper understanding of why and when firms have inconsistent preferences for specific partner selection strategies. Thus, this study offers a unique perspective for understanding firms’ exploratory partner selection by focusing on two important characteristics of focal firms: one internal (inertia) and one external (market uncertainty) in nature.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Hao Shen, Nan Mei and Yu Gao

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proper matches between institutional business ties (to state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and to banks) and firm capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proper matches between institutional business ties (to state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and to banks) and firm capabilities (technological capability and marketing capability) in impacting the radical innovation of manufacturing firms in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the samples of 208 manufacturing firms in China, this study runs three regression models to test all hypotheses.

Findings

Ties to SOEs and ties to banks are positively related to radical innovation of manufacturing firms in China. Further, the technological capability and marketing capability have different functions on moderating the relationship between institutional business ties and radical innovation.

Practical implications

The results imply that managers of manufacturing firms should strive to establish close connections to those organizations that are set-up by government in China. In addition, managers should cautious about the synergies between different institutional business ties and different internal capabilities, and properly matching them to develop radical innovation.

Originality/value

This study enriches and extends the managerial ties literature by going beyond previous narrow focus on either business ties or political ties to address a particular type of organization that is set-up by the governments but operate in the business world. The findings of proper ties-capabilities matches provide nuanced understandings to dynamically manage external resources and internal capabilities for the synergetic benefits (e.g. radical innovation). This study also offer a theoretical paradigm (i.e. resource management model) for manufacturing firms to lessen the striking tension between the urgent needs for radical innovation and the hostile ground for conducting radical innovation.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Esther Cheung and Albert P.C. Chan

Hong Kong has undergone a rapid transformation from a small fishing village to one of Asia's top commercial cities. With the booming economic development that it has…

2088

Abstract

Purpose

Hong Kong has undergone a rapid transformation from a small fishing village to one of Asia's top commercial cities. With the booming economic development that it has undergone, heritage has been criticised as largely neglected. To respond to this criticism proactively, the local government introduced a “Revitalising Historic Buildings through Partnership Scheme” which is considered an innovative social public‐private partnership initiative. However, it is still early stages and the effectiveness of this scheme is yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this paper is therefore to evaluate the success of this innovative scheme by means of a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach has been adopted to analyse the effectiveness of this scheme. The Mei Ho House is a Grade I listed building marking the history of early public housing in Hong Kong. This project was studied thoroughly by looking at the historical background, the selected service provider, project details, historical significance, social benefits and public opinion.

Findings

The findings indicate that the scheme has been implemented effectively to revitalize historical buildings such as Mei Ho House. Efforts have been made to preserve these buildings into innovative use, uplift local culture and social benefits. In addition, an effective partnership arrangement between the public and private parties has been established.

Originality/value

The analyses will help to assess whether the proposed scheme has been successfully implemented. As a result, the suitability of using this scheme for future projects in Hong Kong or even other jurisdictions will be recommended. The proposed scheme will be an innovative and alternative approach for preserving and restoring historical buildings if proved to be feasible.

Details

Property Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Milan Tung‐Wen Sun, Mei‐Chiang Shih, Keng‐Ming Hsu and Jenhei Chen

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to analyse the diffusion of an innovative policy or service and the factors influencing it through an explorative study of the…

574

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to analyse the diffusion of an innovative policy or service and the factors influencing it through an explorative study of the diffusion of the Bookstart program in Taiwan; and second, to provide an analytical framework for further study of this program.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is both empirical and theoretical. It uses data from existing studies and also agencies involved in Bookstart to explain the diffusion of the program. It then draws on theories of policy diffusion and the initial findings of this study to develop an analytical framework for the further study of the diffusion of the Bookstart program.

Findings

The Bookstart program, which is designed to promote reading habits for children 0 to 3 years old and to strengthen parent‐children relations, was originally initiated in the UK. It was first introduced into Taiwan in Taichung County in 2003. The paper shows how the program spread throughout Taiwan and indicates the role of the key players in the diffusion, including charitable institutions, local politicians and leaders, local authority agencies, and the Ministry of Education. The paper posits an analytical framework identifying factors which may help to promote or facilitate the diffusion. In this respect, the paper draws on the theoretical literature and also initial evidence from the research so far undertaken. This will guide the research in the next stage of the study.

Originality/value

This explorative study provides an example of the nature, process and direction of the diffusion of a policy or service innovation, and suggests the possible factors promoting or facilitating it, as identified in the initial findings of the research and in the relevant theoretical literature.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Chao-Chih Hung, Tzung-Cheng Huan, Chun-Han Lee, Hsin-Mei Lin and Wen-Long Zhuang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of regulatory foci (promotion focus and prevention focus) to expatriate adjustments (general, interaction, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of regulatory foci (promotion focus and prevention focus) to expatriate adjustments (general, interaction, and work adjustments) and explore whether mentoring functions (psychosocial support, role modeling, and career development) moderate the aforementioned relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 141 questionnaired primary data (response rate 32.25 percent) gathered from at least six months experienced expatiates of multinational companies in six industries, this study adopts regression method to examine the moderating effect.

Findings

This study found that promotion focus was positively related to the interaction and work adjustment, respectively; prevention focus was positively related to the general, interaction, and work adjustment, respectively. Psychosocial support function moderates the relationship between promotion focus and general adjustment. Career development function moderates the relationships between promotion/prevention foci and work adjustment.

Originality/value

According to the interactionism perspective, behavior is a result of the interaction between personality and situational influences, has a long history in social and personality psychology. This study extends this perspective to the interactive effects of mentorship (situational factor) and expatriates’ regulatory foci (personality factor) on expatriate adjustment.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Chu‐Mei Liu

Attempts to assess the performance of five selected private banking institutions in the Philippines in order to determine how these perform at their vital functions, and…

1274

Abstract

Attempts to assess the performance of five selected private banking institutions in the Philippines in order to determine how these perform at their vital functions, and to what extent they implement their savings consciousness programme, marketing campaign programme, technological innovation and outreach programmes. Findings reveal that all the banking functions perform well except for insurance. Suggests the banks are implementing the programmes as a gesture of sensitivity to the needs of their customers. Discusses how they use a variety of marketing tools such as posters, brochures, leaflets, product kits and media exposure through broadcast and print media, which are considered by the research as the most effective means of promoting the bank’s products and services.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Wen‐Chung Hsu, Xingbo Gao, Jianhua Zhang and Hsin Mei Lin

The paper aims to examine the effects of outward foreign direct investment (O‐FDI) on home‐country productivity.

1588

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the effects of outward foreign direct investment (O‐FDI) on home‐country productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel data set for 15 Taiwanese manufacturing industries over the period between 1991 and 2007 is employed for a model in which productivity is regressed on a measure of O‐FDI.

Findings

The study finds no significant positive or negative effect of O‐FDI on productivity. Breaking down the data by location of the investment, however, we find that O‐FDI in other countries enhances productivity in Taiwan, while O‐FDI in China does not. We interpret the positive role of O‐FDI in other countries as relating to the outcome of strategic asset‐seeking nature of Taiwanese investments in these countries.

Research limitations/implications

In order to analyse the productivity effect of O‐FDI more precisely, one would need to compare the firm outcomes in the presence of multinational production with the outcomes that would have prevailed in the absence of multinational production. Unfortunately, we cannot observe what would have happened to firms that did engage in multinational production had they not done so.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the Taiwanese Government should distinguish the level of liberalization towards O‐FDI for different locations and in different types of industries. In particular, the government should channel more investment towards export‐oriented industries especially those in “other countries”.

Originality/value

The paper employs a contingency approach, examining the conditions under which O‐FDI impacts upon home productivity.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Yu-An Huang, Chad Lin, Hung-Jen Su and Mei-Lien Tung

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of parental and peer norms on idol worship as well as the effect of idol worship on the intention to purchase and obtain…

1521

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of parental and peer norms on idol worship as well as the effect of idol worship on the intention to purchase and obtain the idol’s music products legally and illegally.

Design/methodology/approach

A stratified, two-stage, cluster sampling procedure was applied to a list of high schools obtained from the Ministry of Education in Taiwan. A return rate of 80 per cent yielded 723 usable questionnaires, the data from which were analysed by the LISREL structural equation modelling software.

Findings

The results suggest that both social worship and personal worship have a significant and positive impact on the intention to purchase music. However, personal worship has a negative impact on the intention to pirate music while social worship appears to strengthen it.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that idol worship is more complex than previously understood. The constructs chosen in this research should be seen only as a snapshot but other variables such as vanity trait, autonomy, romanticism or involvement are not taken into account. Future studies would benefit from inclusion of these variables and a wider geographical scope.

Practical implications

The findings contain many implications to help marketing executives and planners better revise their existing marketing and communication strategies to increase their revenue.

Originality/value

Existing research has tended to examine the impact of idol worship as a whole on the reduction of music piracy, but overlook the two-dimensional aspects of idol worship, hence ignoring the fact that many music firms have not properly utilised idol worship to deal with the challenges associated with music piracy. The findings broaden existing understanding about the causes of two different dimensions of idol worship and their different impacts on the intention to music piracy.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Tom W. Miller, Bernell Stone and Harold R. Silver

Discusses arbitrage pricing theory as a multifactor model for explaining rates of return on securities; and the use of principal components analysis to reduce the number…

Abstract

Discusses arbitrage pricing theory as a multifactor model for explaining rates of return on securities; and the use of principal components analysis to reduce the number of variables studies. Applies these ideas to returns on treasury bills and government bonds for 1,000 business days ending in March 1997 to obtain a set of three endogenous factors for the term structure of interest rates, forecasts returns for one‐day and 30‐day horizons and produces a time series of the forecast errors for eight short‐term interest rates. Compares the results with those from a single factor autoregessive forecasting model and finds that although their accuracy is similar for short horizons, the multifactor model is superior for longer horizons and shorter time to maturity.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 24 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2022

I-Fan Yen, Hsin Mei Lin and Yi-Tien Shih

The literature on foreignness has, to date, stressed the liability of foreignness (LOF) and the advantage of foreignness (AOF). Drawing on industrial organisation theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on foreignness has, to date, stressed the liability of foreignness (LOF) and the advantage of foreignness (AOF). Drawing on industrial organisation theory, institutional theory, the resource-based view of the firm and the literature on networking, the authors’ research develops an integrated framework to explore the impact of foreignness on internationalisation depth from the perspective of the duality of foreignness (LOF versus AOF) within multiple dimensions. These dimensions are isomorphism, home country of origin, institutional distance and dual embeddedness of multinational enterprises (MNEs).

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors empirically test hypotheses arising from this new theoretical framework by examining the characteristics of a sample of 324 Chinese MNEs (CMNEs) that were operating in 63 countries from 1999 to 2018. Employing regression analysis on a panel of 9,410 observations, the results show that foreignness does exhibit multilevel complexity and duality.

Findings

The authors’ empirical results show that isomorphism pressures, country of origin and institutional distance have a negative effect on internationalisation depth (as an outcome of LOF) but that dual embeddedness, on the part of MNEs, exerts a positive impact on internationalisation depth (as an outcome of AOF). The implications for research on multilevel complexity and the duality of foreignness are discussed, and managerial implications are outlined.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the authors’ findings for MNEs should not be generalised to developed countries without examining the characteristics of both China as an emerging country and its MNEs. The second limit is regarding ownership; this framework has limitations due to choosing China and its OFDIs for testing internationalisation depth. Finally, for subsequent research, examining the dynamics of foreignness completes the nature of multicomplexity, defined by external and internal factors of foreignness changing over time and space.

Practical implications

CMNE managers are advised to actively scrutinise their behaviours in the local country to overcome the differences in routines, values and practices inherent in local institutions (Chen et al., 2019). The results imply that CMNEs should be careful not to overuse their home country image when penetrating a new market. Thus, a strategy to reduce a home government's hegemonic or otherwise negative image may be wise when operating abroad. Finally, the authors’ model suggests that CMNEs equipped with great RCN CIPs for identifying, scanning and interpreting local institutions can enhance internationalisation depth.

Originality/value

The authors’ research contributes to research on foreignness by emphasising foreignness as a construct of multilevel complexity. The authors argue that foreignness arises due to varying factors at the host, home, host-home levels and at the level of the organisational entity. The authors’ definition of foreignness and empirical results supports the notion that isomorphism pressures (host country-level factors), country-of-origin of home country (home country-level factors) and institutional distance (host-home country-level factors) are inextricably negatively linked with internationalisation depth (as effects of LOF). By contrast, the dual embeddedness of MNEs (the factor of organisational level) represents a positive relationship with internationalisation depth (as effects of AOF).

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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