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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2022

Elina Aaltio and Sirpa Kannasoja

While studies on service users’ participation and their perceptions on the quality of services exist, agreement between family members’ and practitioners’ assessments of…

Abstract

Purpose

While studies on service users’ participation and their perceptions on the quality of services exist, agreement between family members’ and practitioners’ assessments of the family’s situation has received less interest. The purpose of this paper is to investigate agreement and its effect on outcomes by comparing the viewpoints of three groups of informants (children, mothers and practitioners) in the context of statutory child protection in two study groups – one applying a systemic approach (SPM) and a service-as-usual control group (SAU).

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental repeated-measures study design was applied. Outcome data comprised 112 cases (SPM cases n = 56 and SAU cases n = 56) at three sites. Data was collected from all participants at baseline and six months later.

Findings

First, practitioners’ analyses of a child’s need for protection did not meet family members’ expressed need for help. Second, child–mother agreement on the need for service intervention at T1 predicted a decrease in practitioner-assessed abuse or neglect from T1 to T2. In this sample, no differences were found between the two groups.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of making explicit the viewpoints of children, parents and practitioners in casework and research to improve understanding of how their perspectives differ over the course of the process and how possible initial disagreements affect outcomes.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2022

Hazel Hall, Bruce Martin Ryan, Rachel Salzano and Katherine Stephen

The purpose of the empirical study was to examine whether strategies shown to work well in one model of network development for library and information science (LIS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the empirical study was to examine whether strategies shown to work well in one model of network development for library and information science (LIS) practitioners and researchers could be applied successfully in the development of a new network and contribute to the narrowing of the research–practice gap in LIS.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 32 members of a new professional network were surveyed by a questionnaire following the completion of a programme of four network events held between 2019 and 2021.

Findings

The analysis demonstrates the transferability of the existing model of network development to a new network and that it can be successfully adapted for online delivery of network events and activities.

Practical implications

The criteria deployed for the evaluation of the new network could be used in other similar settings. Funding bodies can also use these findings as demonstration of the value of their investment in network grants.

Originality/value

This contribution on means of growing collaborative networks to narrow the LIS research–practice gap stands out in contrast with prior research that tends to focus the support of research productivity of academic librarians in North American universities for the purposes of career development. Here wider aspects of research engagement are considered of value for LIS practitioners from a range of sectors and institutions, beyond North America, for purposes that are broader than personal advancement.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2022

Andreas Wallo and Alan Coetzer

This study aims to explore how human resource (HR) practitioners conceive of their practice, reveal challenges they grapple with in daily work and generate a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how human resource (HR) practitioners conceive of their practice, reveal challenges they grapple with in daily work and generate a conceptual framework of HR praxis.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on interviews with HR practitioners in Sweden and a review of articles that examine aspects of HR practitioners' work.

Findings

The HR practitioners' work is fragmented and reactive, filled with meetings and affords few opportunities to work undisturbed. Operational tasks are prioritised over strategic work, and their work sometimes involves tasks that are not HR's responsibility. The nature of HR practitioners' daily work mimics the work of their main “customer”, i.e. managers within the organisations.

Practical implications

The HR practitioners were working mainly in the service of managers, which suggests that they have an internal focus. Consistent with current, prescriptive HR discourse, HR practitioners should adopt a multi-stakeholder perspective of human resource management (HRM) and a more external focus that is necessary to contribute to wider, organisational effectiveness. The findings could enrich what is taught in higher education by providing students with an account of the reality of HR practitioners' daily work.

Originality/value

The study provides a situated account of the daily work of HR practitioners, which is largely absent from the literature.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

S. NAZIM ALI

During the summer of 1981, fifty library practitioners affiliated with various types of library in Scotland were interviewed to find out how practitioners keep themselves…

Abstract

During the summer of 1981, fifty library practitioners affiliated with various types of library in Scotland were interviewed to find out how practitioners keep themselves up‐to‐date with current innovation and their likes and dislikes in terms of the various forms of material available in the dissemination of research results. The interview sample was drawn from the total library manpower of 15,696 librarians and information workers as represented in the Census of staff in librarianship and information work in 1976. A quota sample of 50 practitioners was selected in proportion to the sizes of the three categories mentioned in footnote (1): 27 (54.0 percent) practitioners from public libraries; 14 (28.0 percent) from academic libraries; and Finally 9 (18.0 percent) from special and government libraries. In order to interview the first set of 27 practitioners, six public library systems were visited: Glasgow (Mitchell), Renfrew, Dundee. Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Highland Regions. Four academic library systems were visited to interview 15 practitioners: Edinburgh University, Heriot‐Watt University, Paisley College and Napier College. Four special and government libraries were visited to interview 9 practitioners: Scottish Office. Department of Environment, Royal College of Physicians, and the National Library of Scotland were selected. In each type of library a minimum of one and maximum of five practitioners was interviewed from different departments or sections and the chief librarians were excluded from the samples.

Details

Library Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2007

Raymond Hubbard and Andrew T. Norman

Given marketing's fundamentally applied nature, to compare the relative impacts in the academy of work published by three groups – practitioners, practitioner‐academic…

1934

Abstract

Purpose

Given marketing's fundamentally applied nature, to compare the relative impacts in the academy of work published by three groups – practitioners, practitioner‐academic alliances, and academics.Design/methodology/approach – Social Sciences Citation Index data were used to estimate the influence of 438 articles published by practitioners, practitioner‐academic alliances, and academics in five marketing journals over the period 1970‐2000.Findings – Citations for academic research were more than twice as high as those for practitioners. Conversely, citations for practitioner‐academic research rival those of the academics, and sometimes exceed them.Research limitations/implications – Only considered US marketing journals.Practical implications – Despite some excellent citation evidence for practitioner‐academic work, additional cooperative efforts must be pursued to ensure the relevance of academic marketing research to practitioner needs.Originality/value – This is the only study to “objectively” address the impact of practitioner, practitioner‐academic alliance, and academic research in the academy.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Brenda Leese, Paul Kind, Ian Cameron and Jennie Carpenter

A postal questionnaire was successfully used to determine generalpractitioner views about the quality of the health care servicesavailable to their patients. In the case…

Abstract

A postal questionnaire was successfully used to determine general practitioner views about the quality of the health care services available to their patients. In the case of hospital services, 75 of the 112 respondents (67 per cent) chose orthopaedics and 52 (46 per cent) chose ophthalmology as services in need of improvement. Other hospital‐based services, chosen by at least ten general practitioners, were gynaecology, gastroenterology/endoscopy, medicine for the elderly, radiology/ultrasound, psychiatry and physiotherapy. Only 74 general practitioners chose community services, with health visiting being chosen by 25 respondents, district nursing by 24, physiotherapy by 20 and chiropody by 18, as being in need of improvement. The survey was intended to provide a basis for a dialogue between clinicians, managers and general practitioners, about how the quality of services could be improved and how they might be developed in the future.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Patrick Gunnigle and Gisela Shivanath

This article is based on a survey of personnel practitioners inIrish organisations, aimed at establishing their role and status withinthe company for which they worked…

Abstract

This article is based on a survey of personnel practitioners in Irish organisations, aimed at establishing their role and status within the company for which they worked. The principal findings from the survey suggest that the majority of personnel practitioners are afforded a top management role, and feel that they are heavily involved in strategic planning decisions within their organisations. The major factor which led to differences in the role of personnel was the national origin of the company which owned the site at which these individuals worked.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2017

Rebecca Bloch, Gary Kleinman and Amanda Peterson

The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive theory as to why academic research in accounting is said not to help practice.The authors (1) present a…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive theory as to why academic research in accounting is said not to help practice.

The authors (1) present a comprehensive literature review in the academic/practitioner gap arena, and (2) develop a theoretical background for it. Further, they identify (3) the different information needs of these groups using value group theory and (4) the inherent factors and personality traits that influence career choice. Next, they (5) evaluate the values of each subgroup. They then (6) theorize what types of accounting research would interest each. They argue that (7) individuals who enter the academy differ from those who enter practice, and (8) the socialization processes and the impact of the professional setting (practice or academe) on behaviors further the separation of academic research from practitioner needs.

This paper is theoretical. It suggests that bridging the gap will be difficult. The study is theoretical. The limitation is that it does not empirically test the relationships hypothesized. By providing a comprehensive model of factors underlying the gap, however, it can be a fruitful source of research ideas for years to come. The implications are that it will be difficult to bridge the gap between accounting practitioners and academics. Having a greater understanding of the causes of the gap, however, may be very useful in fostering thought as to how to overcome it.

Prior literature on the topic is largely atheoretical. This paper is the first to develop a broad theory of the gap.

Details

Parables, Myths and Risks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-534-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2022

Brandon Sej Kesieman and Andani Thakhathi

The success rate of business rescue in South Africa is concerningly low as it currently ranges between 10% and 12%. This study intends to make a positive contribution…

Abstract

The success rate of business rescue in South Africa is concerningly low as it currently ranges between 10% and 12%. This study intends to make a positive contribution towards addressing this problem by obtaining insight from professional business rescue practitioners regarding the feasibility of making use of the practice of business rescue to assist South African state-owned enterprises to avoid them going into insolvency and indefinitely stopping operations. This study, which is a generic qualitative study, will rely solely on the experience and insights of the business rescue practitioners in order to obtain a better understanding of the problem at hand. Nine participants were interviewed during September and October 2020. The study found that business rescue practitioners are confident that the business rescue proceedings are a solution to preserving state-owned enterprises. However, the level of political interference by the unions, government officials, and also the continued bailouts from the government to support these state-owned entities are some concerns raised by the participants as they hinder the effectiveness of the proceedings with regard to state-owned enterprises. Academically, the study expands to the literature on business rescue in the context of state-owned enterprises and what challenges are hindering the process. For managers, the study identifies the key constraints which are most likely to be encountered when conducting business rescue proceedings in a state-owned enterprise which, if not observed, will negatively impact the success rate.

Details

Transcendent Development: The Ethics of Universal Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-260-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2013

David Coghlan

Within the developing exploration of the role of the scholar-practitioner, the situation in which scholar-practitioners engage in the scholarship of practice in their own…

Abstract

Within the developing exploration of the role of the scholar-practitioner, the situation in which scholar-practitioners engage in the scholarship of practice in their own organizational systems has not received much attention. This chapter adopts the position that scholar-practitioners are not merely practitioners who do research but rather that they integrate scholarship in their practice and generate actionable knowledge, that is, knowledge that is robust for scholars and actionable for practitioners. This chapter explores the phenomenon of scholar-practitioners engaging in the scholarship of practice in their own organizational systems as inside change agents. It discusses how scholar-practitioners engage in inquiry-in-action in first-, second-, and third-person modes of inquiry and practice in the present tense and provides a methodology and methods for such engagement that it be rigorous, reflective, and relevant.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

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