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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Centaine L. Snoswell, Monica L. Taylor and Liam J. Caffery

This study aims to determine elements of telehealth that have the potential to increase costs for the health system in the short to medium term.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine elements of telehealth that have the potential to increase costs for the health system in the short to medium term.

Design/methodology/approach

A search of PubMed, EMBASE and Scopus databases was performed in May 2018 using broad terms for telehealth and economics. Articles were included if they identified and explained reasons for an increase in cost for telehealth services. Studies were categorised by economic analysis type for data extraction and descriptive synthesis.

Findings

Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. These studies identified that increased health system costs were due to implementation costs (e.g. for equipment, software or staff training), increased use of other healthcare services (e.g. pharmaceutical services) and ongoing service costs (including staff salaries) resulting from telehealth being additive to traditional service (e.g. increased frequency of contact).

Originality/value

Telehealth is often assumed to be a cost-effective method of delivering healthcare, even to the point where direct cost savings are expected by decision makers as a result of implementation. However, this investigation suggests it does not routinely reduce costs for the health system and can actually increase costs at both implementation and ongoing service delivery stages. Health services considering implementing telehealth should be motivated by benefits other than cost reduction such as improved accessibility, greater patient centricity and societal cost–benefit.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Madhulika Bhatia, Shubham Chaudhary, Madhurima Hooda and Bhuvanesh Unhelkar

This chapter discusses about the advancement in the field of telemedicine and how often the general public are using the services that are provide by the telehealth and…

Abstract

This chapter discusses about the advancement in the field of telemedicine and how often the general public are using the services that are provide by the telehealth and telemedicine market. This chapter starts with the introduction of the medicine in the world, which were the earliest medical practice and how all that thing leads to the today’s telehealth market. This chapter also describes the models that are being used in today’s world, and how these models as implemented and how telemedicine services are implemented more efficiently. Telemedicine and telehealth market is growing day by day and a lot people are getting to know about it, but there is still some section of the society, specially the lower middle class and the people in the rural areas that do not have any access or knowledge about the concept of telehealth services.

Details

Big Data Analytics and Intelligence: A Perspective for Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-099-8

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Agnė Gadeikienė, Asta Pundzienė and Aistė Dovalienė

The rise of telehealth is evident worldwide, especially now with the COVID-19 pandemic situation, and is providing extensive opportunities for health-care organisations to…

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of telehealth is evident worldwide, especially now with the COVID-19 pandemic situation, and is providing extensive opportunities for health-care organisations to create added value for different stakeholders. However, even in this extreme situation, the progress of telehealth is quite slow and insufficient. In this context, it is necessary to consider how the application of telehealth services allows co-creating additional value for different stakeholders. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to explore telehealth services and the added value that they co-create for various stakeholders across publicly and privately oriented health-care ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopted a qualitative research design based on an explorative and comparative approach to study the perceived added value that is co-created during telehealth encounters. The authors deployed a semi-structured interview research design. Interviews were carried out in two settings that have different health-care systems: Lithuania (publicly oriented health care) and the California Bay Area, USA, (privately oriented health care). The research covers telehealth services from the point of view of different stakeholders in the health-care ecosystem.

Findings

The paper emphasises that value-in-use is essential in the case of telehealth; however, value-in-exchange is relevant to describe the relationships between public and private insurers and health-care providers. The findings point out that despite the type of health-care system, telehealth added value-in-use was perceived quite similar in both research settings, and differences could be distinguished mainly at the sub-dimensional level. The added value-in-use for patients comprises economic, functional and emotional value; physicians potentially get functional added value-in-use. The authors also highlight that patients and physicians get relational functional and social value-in-use. The added value-in-use for health-care providers consists of economic (in both research settings) and functional value (in Lithuania). The research findings show that there is still an evident lack of health insurance companies ready to recognise telehealth as a valuable service and to reimburse similarly to in cases of in-person visits. Thus, the added value-in-exchange is hardly created and this impedes co-creation of the added value-in-use.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the field mainly by transferring the business research applied concept of value co-creation into the social-purpose driven health-care industry. The findings are beneficial for the health-care management stream of the literature, which considers health care as a value-based industry. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to structure the perceived telehealth added value from the perspectives of different stakeholders and two different health-care ecosystems. This paper also gives a clearer understanding of the role of the value-in-exchange in such complex ecosystems as health care and gives reasons when it could be created in synergy with co-creation of the value-in-use. In this sense, the findings are beneficial from both marketing and innovation theoretical perspectives, as they give a special attention to value creation and co-creation phenomena analysis.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Jennifer L. Cox, Claire Ellen Seaman, Sarah Hyde, Katharine M. Freire and Jacqueline Mansfield

There are growing expectations that students graduating from health courses and current health professionals have some proficiency in using telehealth. However, there is…

Abstract

Purpose

There are growing expectations that students graduating from health courses and current health professionals have some proficiency in using telehealth. However, there is limited accessibility to multidisciplinary-based material to meet this need. This paper describes the development of an online telehealth education resource using a co-design approach and the strengths and challenges of embedding authentic learning principles in an open-access online course with a broad target audience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first describe the co-design process of the course and discuss the pedagogy underpinning the course design. Then learner enrolment data is discussed to evidence uptake across key characteristics. Finally, the authors assess the efficacy of the co-design approach by analysing feedback collected from learners at the end of the course.

Findings

The course is structured across four modules and comprises interactive content, reflective tasks, case studies and purposefully developed digital material. Responses from the working group and from learner feedback indicate that the course is an authentic and relevant introduction to telehealth practice for both health students and current health professionals, despite some limitations.

Originality/value

This case study demonstrates the value of a co-design process and key learning design choices in online course development to meet the educational needs of learners from broad disciplinary backgrounds, in various stages of learning/understanding of telehealth and/or requiring a practice-based resource in the context of a rapidly changing policy environment.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Christian M. Graham and Nory Jones

The purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits of the internet of things (IoT) technology on geriatric telehealth.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the benefits of the internet of things (IoT) technology on geriatric telehealth.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study approach is used to understand the applicability of the internet of medical things in geriatric telehealth. Data was collected from several managers who analyzed rates of re-hospitalizations for patients using telehealth services compared to those not using telehealth services and observations of patient satisfaction rates with telehealth services.

Findings

Benefits from the use of IoT included significant reductions in re-hospitalization rates for older adults and patients became more engaged in maintaining their health and wellness goals while becoming more tech-savvy, empowered and satisfied with the telehealth experience.

Originality/value

The present manuscript is among the few reports on the benefits of IoT on geriatric health care.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Cathy Bailey, Glenda Cook, Linda Herman, Christine McMillan, Jo Rose, Roy Marston, Eleanor Binks and Emma Barron

The purpose of this paper is to report on a small telehealth pilot in local authority sheltered housing in NE England. This explored the training and capacity building…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a small telehealth pilot in local authority sheltered housing in NE England. This explored the training and capacity building needed to develop a workforce/older person, telehealth partnership and service that is integrated within existing health, social care and housing services.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study approach on the implementation and deployment of a pilot telehealth service, supporting sheltered housing tenants with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=4).

Findings

Telehealth training and capacity building, needs to develop from within the workforce/older person partnership, if a usable and acceptable telehealth service is to be developed and integrated within existing health, care and housing services. To be adaptable to changing circumstances and individual need, flexible monitoring is also required.

Practical implications

Service users and workforces, need to work together to provide flexible telehealth monitoring, that in the longer term, may improve service user, quality of life.

Originality/value

The pilot explored a workforce/older person partnership to consider how to add and implement telehealth services, into existing health and housing services.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2009

Simon Brownsell

Despite substantial investment over recent years in telehealth there appears to be little consensus regarding what a successful implementation should achieve. However…

Abstract

Despite substantial investment over recent years in telehealth there appears to be little consensus regarding what a successful implementation should achieve. However, defining success is often controversial and complex due to differing views from the large number of stakeholders involved, the local environment where telehealth is deployed and the scope, or size, of any planned initiative. Nevertheless, a number of generic measures are proposed in this paper which then provides a framework for the measurement of success. The local context can then be applied to determine the exact emphasis on specific measures, but it is proposed that all of the measures should be included in the holistic measurement of success. Having considered what constitutes success, attention is then given to how success should be quantified. Robust evaluation is fundamental and there is much debate as to whether the ‘gold standard’ randomised control trial (RCT) is the most appropriate methodology for telehealth. If the intervention, technology and system, can be maintained in a stable state then the RCT may well provide the most authoritative evidence for decision‐makers. However, ensuring such stability, in what is still a novel combination of technology and service, is difficult and consequently other approaches may be more appropriate when stability is unlikely to be maintained.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2010

Nick Goodwin

Telehealth and telecare innovations have the potential to improve quality of life, reduce unnecessary hospital and care home admissions, and support care integration by…

Abstract

Telehealth and telecare innovations have the potential to improve quality of life, reduce unnecessary hospital and care home admissions, and support care integration by providing care and disease management from multi‐disciplinary care teams linked remotely to users. About 1.7 million people benefit from telecare services in the UK, but telehealth services have only around 5000 users, many of whom receive services through the Department of Health's Whole System Demonstrator (WSD) Pilot Programme. There is an identifiable chasm between early adopters and wider uptake of telehealth and telecare solutions. Key barriers include lack of robust evidence on cost‐effectiveness, of a consumer market and of interoperability of the technology between service sectors, and the implications for professionals and organisations of changing their established methods of practice. Telehealth and telecare could be combined to provide a common platform to integrate care for people requiring both health and social care support, but relatively few people are judged suitable for joint care. This is related both to the nature of the technology and the profile of those people who can use it, and to the different ways in which health and social care systems assess who is most 'at risk', which makes it difficult to assess which individuals might best benefit from an integrated response to their care needs. While there is considerable interest and policy momentum behind the adoption and diffusion of telehealth and telecare in England, more understanding of their benefits is required to convince commissioners and providers of its potential.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Marie‐Pierre Gagnon, Lise Lamothe, Jean‐Paul Fortin, Alain Cloutier, Gaston Godin, Camille Gagné and Daniel Reinharz

The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of hospitals’ organisational characteristics on telehealth adoption by health‐care centres involved in the extended…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of hospitals’ organisational characteristics on telehealth adoption by health‐care centres involved in the extended telehealth network of Quebec (French acronym RQTE)

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on a review of the literature and a questionnaire, which was administered via telephone interviews to the 32 hospitals involved in the Extended Telehealth Network of Quebec. Contingency analyses were performed to determine which organisational factors have influenced telehealth adoption. Subsequently, a multiple case study was conducted among nine hospitals representative of different categories of telehealth adopters. In‐depth interviews with various actors involved in telehealth activities have permitted a deepening of one's understanding of the impact of clinical and administrative contexts on telehealth adoption.

Findings

The results from both the questionnaire and interviews support the observation made by Whitten and Adams in 2003 that telehealth programs are not isolated, but located within larger health organisations. Moreover, health‐care organisations are also positioned in a larger geographical, economical and socio‐political environment. Therefore, it is important to investigate the context in which telehealth projects are taking place prior to experimentation.

Originality/value

This study has highlighted the relevance of considering the characteristics and the dynamics of health‐care organisations at each stage of telehealth implementation in order to take their specific needs into account.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Babu George, Lena Bucatariu and Tony L. Henthorne

Telehealth has been playing a progressively significant role in the management of the COVID-19 crisis. The enforcement of social distancing measures has had the…

Abstract

Telehealth has been playing a progressively significant role in the management of the COVID-19 crisis. The enforcement of social distancing measures has had the consequence of reduced technology distance in almost every walk of life. In this chapter, based primarily on the still-unfolding experiences of deploying it during the current situation, we argue that telehealth has finally come of age and that it is time to move it from the peripheries to the center of the twenty-first-century healthcare. To provide a live context to the discussion, several instances of how telehealth strengthened our healthcare systems during the COVID-19 crisis are presented.

Details

International Case Studies in the Management of Disasters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-187-5

Keywords

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