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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

While car maker Saab may now be part of US giant GM, its marketers haven't forgotten its roots. “Born from jets” is a powerful advertising slogan for powerful cars. But closer scrutiny of the current relationships between aircraft and automobile engineering and development might tell a different story.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Richard Shepherd, Claire M. Paisley, Paul Sparks, Annie S. Anderson, Susan Eley and Mike E.J. Lean

Describes work carried out on a two‐year Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded project of the constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications…

3532

Abstract

Describes work carried out on a two‐year Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded project of the constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications for the adoption and maintenance of healthy diets. Looks at whether there are differences in diet knowledge and preferences between people on different income levels.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Annie S. Anderson, David Marshall, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Compared with the rest of the UK, the Scots have a particularly poorreputation for eating fruit and vegetables. The reasons for this arevaried and thought to relate to climate…

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Abstract

Compared with the rest of the UK, the Scots have a particularly poor reputation for eating fruit and vegetables. The reasons for this are varied and thought to relate to climate, availability and poor quality, with the costs of these foods being a major barrier to dietary change. To examine this in further detail, a number of focus group discussions were carried out and key questions used in the monthly national Scottish Opinion Survey. Discusses the results, which showed that Scots are complacent about dietary change and the concept of “dietary moderation” provides good grounds for inaction. Quantitative guidelines such as the WHO (World Health Organization) recommendation to consume 400g (about five portions) of fruit and vegetables daily provide clear guidelines for dietary goals and allow diets to be planned on both on an individual and a catering level.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

David Marshall, Annie S. Anderson, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive toimprove Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit andvegetable consumption. Despite various…

2857

Abstract

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive to improve Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Despite various attempts, consumption remains well below World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations. Consumer confusion and complacency towards diet are apparent and the relationship between knowledge about good diet and behaviour is unclear. Highlights the need to consider how consumers make choices. Diet and health are not regarded as a problem for the majority of Scots but the major barriers to increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables reflect the additional costs incurred and the somewhat limited role for these products in Scottish cuisine. Indicates that price incentives and emphasis on the healthy benefits of eating more fruit and vegetables appear to be the most likely to succeed in increasing consumption; but there appear to be more opportunities to increase fruit as opposed to vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Samsong Fang and Brian H. Kleiner

Spotlights the Toyota automobile company and its status as the third largest car producer, in addition to being the fifth largest industrial company in the world. Concentrates on…

7954

Abstract

Spotlights the Toyota automobile company and its status as the third largest car producer, in addition to being the fifth largest industrial company in the world. Concentrates on the Japanese management system and its value and philosophy. Delves into the Toyota corporate structure and hiring process, stressing the ethics of the team as being the most important part of the process, with open communication, non‐monetary awards, and the pay/bonus system – which are allied to making the company more successful.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Mike Rawlinson and Pete Wells

The lean production model does not say much about the shop‐floor implications for working practices and labour management relations — the assumption is that workers would prefer…

Abstract

The lean production model does not say much about the shop‐floor implications for working practices and labour management relations — the assumption is that workers would prefer to be under a lean regime — or indeed how firms might begin to introduce new working practices (Womak et al 1990). On the other hand, many related studies have been critical of the model, noting for example work intensification, greater management control, and questioning the notion of multi‐skilling (Rehder 1989, 1990, Dankbaar 1988, Pollert 1988) and its applicability (Wood 1991). Using four European case studies in automotive presswork, this paper examines the introduction of new working practices on the shop‐floor, and the links between those practices and the introductions of new presswork technologies. Finally, we draw conclusions from the case studies with respect to our understanding of skill and the relationship between organisational and technological changes on the shop‐floor.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 75 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Michael G. Pratt, Mark A. Fuller and Gregory B. Northcraft

Technology has made it possible to have groups whose members are not co-located, but which may still capture the benefits of traditional co-located interaction. Identification…

Abstract

Technology has made it possible to have groups whose members are not co-located, but which may still capture the benefits of traditional co-located interaction. Identification helps determine whether groups gain the benefits of co-located interaction, and how technology is used to mediate group interaction can influence identification processes. Unfortunately, in heterogeneous groups, communication technology that facilitates group identification also makes competing “fault line” identities more salient. Fortunately, channel expansion theory suggests that with effective management, groups can avoid this dilemma of media selection by learning to use lean media to communicate rich messages.When the day arrived for the three of us were to send a draft of this chapter to Terri, Greg decided that it would be funny to e-mail her a terribly underdeveloped outline, instead of the completed draft that we had finished the day earlier. Terri, seeing the outline for the joke it was, called Greg and said that it might be fun to send a message that made Mike think she had sent the terribly underdeveloped outline to the other chapter authors. Mike received the message the next day and asked Greg why he had sent an outline instead of the chapter draft to Terri. Greg mentioned his and Terri's pranks and also mentioned that Terri had copied the message to Mark—the other author on the chapter, but someone Mike had never (and at the time of this writing, still has not) met. Mike, not wanting to be left out of a good joke (but also slightly uncomfortable to pull a prank on a “stranger”), sent a follow-up message to Terri and “cc'd” Mark. The message said that Mike was so embarrassed by the outline and so frustrated with Greg, that he was going to drop his name from the paper, and was not going to present the paper at the authors' conference in New York. Mark joked back that he would be glad to present, but the title of the paper would now be “Virtual Collaboration: The Butthead Factor.”

Details

Research on Managing Groups and Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-052-4

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Mark Goodridge

This paper seeks to examine how organizations can not only survive the effects of a downturn by taking a strategic approach, but also use this opportunity to emerge from uncertain…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine how organizations can not only survive the effects of a downturn by taking a strategic approach, but also use this opportunity to emerge from uncertain times leaner, fitter and better able to adapt to new market conditions. The paper includes contributions from Mark Goodridge, CEO, Louise Earle, Jane‐Catherine Hartshorn, Martyn Sakol and Mike Thackray, all at ER Consultants, which specializes in organization behavior change.

Design/methodology/approach

Thie paper draws on research and the experience of ER Consultants in the field to examine how organizations can successfully deal with a downturn and positively approach a reorganization situation.

Findings

The secret is not to fall into the trap of knee‐jerk reorganization. Reorganization can be a wonderful way of creating an illusion of progress while producing only confusion, inefficiency and demoralization. This is not to deny that change is sometimes necessary – it is just that organizations need to be strategic and choose the right architecture. Successful reorganizations require trust that is built on respect and timely communication, as well as energized leaders and strategic responses that eliminate actions based on panic. Successful high performance organizations get through tough times by avoiding laying people off, cutting funding or reducing investment in core parts of the business unless it is absolutely necessary. Instead they are innovative about retaining talent in order to gain competitive advantage when market conditions improve and create an energizing environment.

Originality/value

In a credit crunch environment it can be all too easy for external factors and concerns to drain the positive energy that forms the powerhouse of a successful organization. As recent research has demonstrated, leadership energy can be directly linked to customer satisfaction, absenteeism, turnover, employee energy levels and, therefore, bottom‐line results. The ability to boost energy in the workplace provides significant competitive advantage by helping to retain and motivate staff.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Harry Scarbrough and Mike Terry

Contrasts theories of the “Japanization” of British industry with empirical evidence from established car producers in that industry. Suggests that while the UK car industry has…

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Abstract

Contrasts theories of the “Japanization” of British industry with empirical evidence from established car producers in that industry. Suggests that while the UK car industry has been heavily influenced by Japanese methods, established producers follow policies marked by indigenous influences rather than by any unmediated Japanese effect. Proceeds to explore relationships between processual change in plant‐level work organization and the overarching context of institutions and ideas. Investigates the relevance of the two major theoretical models of workplace change in the motor industry ‐ the “diffusion” and the “bolt‐on” models of change ‐ and their conflicting interpretations of the impact of the Japanese “lean production” approach. Compares models with case‐studies of changing work practices at Rover and Peugeot and suggests that neither model provides a satisfactory account of the patterns of change found. Develops instead a model of change which emphasizes the creative adaptation of production practices within the British context.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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