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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Mudassar Ali, Zhang Li, Salim Khan, Syed Jamal Shah and Rizwan Ullah

This paper aims to examine the impact of humble leadership on project success. The authors propose that such an effect is mediated by team-building, and top management…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of humble leadership on project success. The authors propose that such an effect is mediated by team-building, and top management support moderates the direct relationship (humble leadership and project success) as well as an indirect relationship through team-building.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 337 individuals employed in the information technology sector of Pakistan. A two-step approach consisting confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling was used for analysis. To examine conditional direct and indirect effects, the authors utilized model 8 in PROCESS.

Findings

The results showed that humble leadership is positively related to project success. Furthermore, team-building partially mediates the relationship between humble leadership and project success. Moreover, top management support was anticipated to have a moderating effect on the direct and indirect link (via team-building) between humble leadership and project success.

Originality/value

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study found that how humble leadership is vital for project success, and thus, extends the utility of the concept of humble leadership to the project literature.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Marilyn E. Harris and Ross N. Nicholson

Ten common “sand‐traps”, selected bytwo teambuilding consultants fromtheir experiences in team building, arediscussed along with the interventionsthat have worked…

Abstract

Ten common “sand‐traps”, selected by two teambuilding consultants from their experiences in team building, are discussed along with the interventions that have worked successfully for them and with their clients, both team leaders and team members, in chipping out of the sometimes unavoidable sand‐trap. The sand‐trap metaphor also points to sharpening skills already apparent in the team, and to increasing alternatives for constructive problem solving. A consultant′s checklist is included for managing a successful teambuilding effort.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Jack C.P. Cheng and Vignesh Venkataraman

Literature on organizational analysis identified that project participants have a certain impact on the project outcome. However, there is no study that identifies the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature on organizational analysis identified that project participants have a certain impact on the project outcome. However, there is no study that identifies the impact of project teams and individual project participants on a green building project. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of green building project teams on green building certification.

Design/methodology/approach

Project information, project team information, and green building certification grade were collected using the Canadian green building database. Project team data were analyzed and organizations were ranked based on their green building project experience and collaborations with experienced green building organizations. The page rank algorithm is used to calculate the rank of organizations in order to identify the impact of organizational rank on the final green building certification grade of a project.

Findings

The results show a positive relationship between the green building certification grade and the number of organizations with more green building experience in a project team. The results also show that not having experienced key organizations such as owners, designers, and contractors will likely lead to a lower green building certification grade.

Originality/value

Impact of project teams on green building projects has not been studied before. This study used an innovative method to analyze green building project teams and to investigate the importance of green building project experience. The findings of this study provided evidence to support the influence of project team compositions in green building projects. The results presented in this paper can help project owners and managers during project team formation for successful execution of green building projects.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Sepani Senaratne and Prasanna Rajitha Hewamanage

Leadership of the project team is vital for green building projects in achieving LEED certification. Literature findings confirm the need for managing green building

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership of the project team is vital for green building projects in achieving LEED certification. Literature findings confirm the need for managing green building projects differently from ordinary projects. The team leader should be able to work with the project team to manage the general project activities while following the LEED certification procedure to finally achieve LEED certification. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a research project which was aimed to explore the role of team leadership in achieving LEED certification in a green building project through a case study research approach.

Findings

The research findings revealed the importance of utilizing the appropriate leadership roles of project team members in addition to the project leader’s role to achieve LEED certification for green building projects successfully. The research proposed four team leadership processes required to meet the LEED challenges; namely, proactive planning and visualization; collective implementation; teamwork for win-win; and, continuous learning and knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

Based on these findings, the research suggests a new project team environment enabled by effective team leadership to meet the LEED challenges. It is argued that the team leadership role of every team member is unique and best suited when used synergistically to achieve LEED certification for the project. The research is original in applying team leadership concepts to green building projects in a real-life setting.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2017

Maria Vincenza Ciasullo, Silvia Cosimato, Matteo Gaeta and Rocco Palumbo

This paper reports a study that compares two different team-building approaches. The first one is the traditional top-down management approach. The second one is a hybrid…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports a study that compares two different team-building approaches. The first one is the traditional top-down management approach. The second one is a hybrid bottom-up approach based on the consensus model. The aim of this paper is to determine which of the two approaches is the most effective across a number of performance measurements.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is presented using data collected and analysed from a small family-owned vehicle maintenance firm. A mixed methods approach to data collection is utilized, including participant observation, focus groups, survey questionnaires and organizational performance reports. A convenience sample of eight routine maintenance jobs was selected for team performance comparison purposes. The measures used for comparing the two team approaches were lead time, customer satisfaction ratings and employees’ satisfaction ratings.

Findings

The teams assembled using the consensus approach performed better than those selected using the traditional top-down approach across all three performance measures, i.e. the jobs were completed faster and both customers and employees were more satisfied.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory case study limited to one small family-owned business and, as such, findings may not be generalizable.

Practical implications

As an alternative to manager selected work teams, managers should involve and empower employees to select their own teams. This has the potential to offer benefits for both customers and employees of faster delivery times and increase satisfaction, as well as increase productivity for the firm.

Originality/value

This is the first field study to compare the performance of a hybrid, bottom-up approach to team building with the performance of a more traditional management, top-down approach to team building. It paves the way for a wider study to be conducted in the future to test the findings’ generalizability.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Patricia Brouwer, Mieke Brekelmans, Loek Nieuwenhuis and Robert‐Jan Simons

The aim of this study is to explore whether and to what degree community development of teacher teams takes place and how community development comes about, that is, what…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore whether and to what degree community development of teacher teams takes place and how community development comes about, that is, what community‐building efforts teacher teams undertake.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multi method approach, quantitative and qualitative data were gathered from seven interdisciplinary teacher teams in a secondary school during one school year. Teachers' perceptions of community development were complemented with video‐observations of team meetings by relative outsiders.

Findings

Data showed that the teacher teams undertook a wide variety and amount of community‐building efforts. However, community development of the teacher teams as perceived by the teachers was limited. Relative outsiders observed some community development.

Practical implications

From the findings the authors conclude that school managers could play a more proactive role in supporting teacher teams' community‐building efforts. Strategies embedding community‐building into the culture and policy of the school, including diagnosing, custom‐made support and making efforts explicit, could be effective.

Originality/value

The current study takes a long‐term approach, investigating the community development of teacher teams during the course of one school year. In addition, community development is measured using two perspectives, i.e. that of the community members and that of the relative outsider.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Yun Lou, Xuanhui Liu, Pei Chen, Kejun Zhang and Lingyun Sun

The purpose of this study is to explore how gender influences peer assessment in team-building activities in China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how gender influences peer assessment in team-building activities in China.

Design/methodology/approach

A nine-player Werewolf game was adopted to conduct the experiment. Nine abilities were defined to evaluate players’ performances. Before the game, players filled out a self-assessment questionnaire (five-point Likert scale). After the game, players evaluated other game members’ performances using the same questionnaire. Data were analyzed using linear regression.

Findings

The results showed that gender bias clearly existed in team-building activities, with men more likely to receive better peer assessment than women. In addition, when women presented themselves as actively as men did, they received less favorable evaluations than men, whereas their failures were more likely to be exaggerated.

Practical implications

This study may help build harmonious teams for gender equality, and we give practical suggestions respectively from the perspective of female employees, their managers, and their companies.

Originality/value

Given the importance of team-building activities in teamwork, fair evaluations of team-building performances are essential. However, gender influences on peer assessment in team-building activities in China remain unclear. This study adds new and important knowledge to research on gender bias in teams.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

R. Wayne Boss

The pressures currently facing US health care organisations,especially hospitals, in a risk environment are analysed. An importantroute to maximising efficiency is…

Abstract

The pressures currently facing US health care organisations, especially hospitals, in a risk environment are analysed. An important route to maximising efficiency is identified as improved collaboration amongst personnel. Teambuilding interventions are recommended and the elements essential to effective team building are listed together with the benefits that can accrue from such exercises.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Rosemary K. Rushmer

Looks at the use of the Team Management Index (TMI) as a team building intervention in a programme of organizational development (OD). Attempts to assess the instrument’s…

Abstract

Looks at the use of the Team Management Index (TMI) as a team building intervention in a programme of organizational development (OD). Attempts to assess the instrument’s effectiveness using a variety of measures (including the taxonomy of De Meuse and Liebowitz, 1981). In so doing, raises wider methodological and epistemological issues as to the whole nature of data collection, validity and proof in measuring the effectiveness of OD interventions. Discovers that, according to the measurement criteria, set out by De Meuse and Liebowitz, the TMI can be considered to be an effective OD instrument. However, finds that these measurement techniques are “blunt” and, by their very nature, lacking in academic rigour. Argues, therefore, that all levels of data collection and evidence gathering can never constitute 100 per cent proof of a causal link between OD interventions and resultant changes in the organization. Concludes that what will be deemed to count as adequate evidence or proof of an intervention’s effectiveness ultimately will be a personal choice; that in concentrating on comparing before and after measures of a team’s effectiveness theorists have ignored the change process which is taking place as a team begins to become effective, and have treated teams at the end of a team building intervention as if they were finished products; and finally that research time should be devoted to studying the process of change which a team undergoes during its development (of which team building is just the beginning) in order to highlight the ways in which an organization could nurture, support and facilitate this process to ensure the effective development of its work teams.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Rosemary Rushmer

For many years there has been a preoccupation with the need to evaluate the effectiveness of team building interventions (TBIs) in organizational development projects…

Abstract

For many years there has been a preoccupation with the need to evaluate the effectiveness of team building interventions (TBIs) in organizational development projects. Often these evaluations attempt some kind of measurement of the team before and after the teambuilding event in order to measure any change in skills or attitudes. Such work has several potentially valuable outcomes. However, such research often has had mixed success in gathering or assessing data that would serve as conclusive (“bottom line”) proof in these cases. Much of the research does not even attempt an evaluation. It may be that the nature of the phenomena under investigation itself, or the circumstances under which data are collected, is not amenable to that kind of analysis. The starting point for this paper then, is twofold: (1) if it has proved elusive and largely fruitless to try to evaluate team building in these ways; maybe there is a better and more useful way to examine the action that takes place on TBIs?; and; (2) if it is the case that team building is often an intervention that in practice turns out to be less than permanent (and perhaps even damaging), what can be done to help overcome this problem? Takes the view that to try and assess the effectiveness of the team building event per se is to treat the team after the teambuilding event as a finished product. Instead, the teambuilding intervention is seen as a start, with the team in the process of becoming. Sees the team as a dynamic entity, always under flux and adapting to its circumstances. Postulates that if we can identify what is happening both within the team and to the individuals involved during a teambuilding event that sparks off this process of becoming an effective team, then this might gives assistance to the organization as to what kinds of support, practices and resources they might be able to offer the team on its return to ensure the becoming continues. Data were collected from 22 full‐time MBA students on a three‐day outward bound residential course via an open‐ended questionnaire. Each student was asked to recount, in their own words, positive and negative events on a daily basis and consider whether anything had changed regarding themselves or the team. Examines emergent themes in a discursive way and proposes tentative recommendations in what is a preliminary study in an ongoing piece of work.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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