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Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01443579510083622. When citing…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01443579510083622. When citing the article, please cite: Andy Neely, Mike Gregory, Ken Platts, (1995), “Performance measurement system design: A literature review and research agenda”, International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Vol. 15 Iss: 4, pp. 80 - 116.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Andy Neely, John Mills, Ken Platts, Huw Richards, Mike Gregory, Mike Bourne and Mike Kennerley

Describes the development and testing of a structured methodology for the design of performance measurement systems. Frameworks, such as the balanced scorecard and the…

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27021

Abstract

Describes the development and testing of a structured methodology for the design of performance measurement systems. Frameworks, such as the balanced scorecard and the performance prism, have been proposed, but until recently little attention has been devoted to the question of how these frameworks can be populated, i.e. how managers can decide specifically which measures to adopt. Following a wide ranging review of the performance measurement literature, a framework identifying the desirable characteristics of a performance measurement system design process is developed. This framework provided guidelines which were subsequently used to inform the development of a process‐based approach to performance measurement system design. The process was enhanced and refined during application in three action research projects, involving major UK automotive and aerospace companies. The revised process was then formally documented and tested through six further industrial applications. Finally the process was written up in the form of a workbook and made publicly available.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Afonso Fleury, Mike Gregory and David Bennett

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1115

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

John Mills, Andy Neely, Ken Platts, Huw Richards and Mike Gregory

This paper describes a longitudinal picture of manufacturing strategy called a strategy chart. It begins with a summary of the research methodology used to develop and…

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5366

Abstract

This paper describes a longitudinal picture of manufacturing strategy called a strategy chart. It begins with a summary of the research methodology used to develop and test the picture in live situations. Next, the chart and its role within an overall manufacturing strategy process are described. Case examples are then used to illustrate practical outcomes of a longitudinal viewpoint in two areas; first, to increase the awareness of a firm′s strategy making process and, second, to make strategies more explicit than previous methods. The method produces a rich picture that appears useful for reviewing the coherence between manufacturing and business strategy; showing strategy as concrete actions as well as objectives and plans; for providing insight into the firm′s realised strategy and its strategy process; and as a strategy communication tool which may make strategies more credible.

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Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Jagjit Singh Srai and Mike Gregory

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of configuration on supply network capability. It was believed that a configuration perspective might provide new…

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8303

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of configuration on supply network capability. It was believed that a configuration perspective might provide new insights on the capability and performance of supply networks, a gap in the literature, and provide a basis for the development of tools to aid their analysis and design.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved the development of a configuration definition and mapping approach extending established strategic and firm level constructs to the network operational level. The resulting tools were tested and refined in a series of case studies across a range of sectors and value chain models. Supply network capability assessments, from the perspective of the focal firm, were then compared with their configuration profiles.

Findings

The configuration mapping tools were found to give new insights into the structure of supply networks and allow comparisons to be made across sectors and business models through the use of consistent and quantitative methods and common presentation. They provide the foundations for linking configuration to capability and performance, and contribute to supply network design and development by highlighting the intrinsic capabilities associated with different configurations.

Research limitations/implications

Although multiple case networks have been investigated, the configuration exemplars remain suggestive models. The research suggests that a re‐evaluation of operational process excellence models is needed, where the link between process maturity and performance may require a configuration context.

Practical implications

Advantages of particular configurations have been identified with implications for supply network development and industrial policy.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to develop established strategic management configuration concepts to the analysis and design of supply networks by providing a robust operational definition of supply network configuration and novel tools for their mapping and assessment.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Yufeng Zhang, Mike Gregory and Yongjiang Shi

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrating framework for the configuration and performance of global engineering networks (GEN).

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1259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrating framework for the configuration and performance of global engineering networks (GEN).

Design/methodology/approach

The reported study is based on a comprehensive literature review and refined by the practice of three global leading companies along key industry sectors.

Findings

This framework presents the key patterns of GEN from an evolution perspective and demonstrates the influence of the major driving forces.

Research limitations/implications

In addition, this study also identifies research opportunities in two areas: further testing the theory of GEN with a broader range of industry sectors, and expanding the study to inter‐firm engineering activities. The further study is planned accordingly.

Originality/value

The paper offers a systematic view of GEN and can help companies in the design and operation.

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Yufeng Zhang and Mike Gregory

This paper aims to improve understanding of how to manage global network operations from an engineering perspective.

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4557

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve understanding of how to manage global network operations from an engineering perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted a theory building approach based on case studies. Grounded in the existing literature, the theoretical framework was refined and enriched through nine in‐depth case studies in the industry sectors of aerospace, automotives, defence and electrics and electronics.

Findings

This paper demonstrates the main value creation mechanisms of global network operations along the engineering value chain. Typical organisational features to support the value creation mechanisms are captured, and the key issues in engineering network design and operations are presented with an overall framework.

Practical implications

Evidenced by a series of pilot applications, outputs of this research can help companies to improve the performance of their current engineering networks and design new engineering networks to better support their global businesses and customers in a systematic way.

Originality/value

Issues about the design and operations of global engineering networks (GEN) are poorly understood in the existing literature in contrast to their apparent importance in value creation and realisation. To address this knowledge gap, this paper introduces the concept of engineering value chain to highlight the potential of a value chain approach to the exploration of engineering activities in a complex business context. At the same time, it develops an overall framework for managing GEN along the engineering value chain. This improves our understanding of engineering in industrial value chains and extends the theoretical understanding of GEN through integrating the engineering network theories and the value chain concepts.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Pichawadee Kittipanya‐ngam, Yongjiang Shi and Mike J. Gregory

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key influential factors and their implications on food supply chain (FSC) location decisions from a Thailand‐based manufacturer's view.

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1366

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key influential factors and their implications on food supply chain (FSC) location decisions from a Thailand‐based manufacturer's view.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 21 case studies were conducted with eight Thailand‐based food manufacturers. In each case, key influential factors were observed along with their implications on upstream and downstream FSC location decisions. Data were collected through semi‐structured interviews and documentations. Data reduction and data display in tables were used to help data analysis of the case studies.

Findings

This exploratory research found that, in the food industry, FSC geographical dispersion pattern could be determined by four factors: perishability, value density, economic‐political forces, and technological forces. Technological forces were found as an enabler for FSC geographical dispersion whereas the other three factors could be both barriers and enablers. The implications of these four influential factors drive FSC towards four key patterns of FSC geographical dispersion: local supply chain (SC), supply‐proximity SC, market‐proximity SC, and international SC. Additionally, the strategy of the firm was found to also be an influential factor in determining FSC geographical dispersion.

Research limitations/implications

Despite conducting 21 cases, the findings in this research are based on a relatively small sample, given the large size of the industry. More case evidence from a broader range of food product market and supply items, particularly ones that have significantly different patterns of FSC geographical dispersions would have been insightful. The consideration of additional influential factors such as labour movement between developing countries, currency fluctuations and labour costs, would also enrich the framework as well as improve the quality and validity of the research findings. The different strategies employed by the case companies and their implications on FSC location decisions should also be further investigated along with cases outside Thailand, to provide a more comprehensive view of FSC geographical location decisions.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights how FSC is geographically located in both supply‐side and demand‐side from a manufacturing firm's view. The findings can also provide SC managers and researchers a better understanding of their FSCs.

Originality/value

This research bridges the existing gap in the literature, explaining the geographical dispersion of SC particularly in the food industry where the characteristics are very specific, by exploring the internationalization ability of Thailand‐based FSC and generalizing the key influential factors – perishability (lead time), value density, economic‐political forces, market opportunities, and technological advancements. Four key patterns of FSC internationalization emerged from the case studies.

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Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Christer Karlsson and Martin Sköld

Traditional perspectives of manufacturing strategy tend to focus internal transforming activities, including how transformed resources are handled and the relations with…

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1921

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional perspectives of manufacturing strategy tend to focus internal transforming activities, including how transformed resources are handled and the relations with other value‐creating operations inside and outside the firm. Manufacturing management evolved as a discipline with little clear alignments with business strategy and firm positioning. Even manufacturing strategy is often delimited to the boundaries of the firm and its dyad relations to collaborating actors such as suppliers and distributors. This paper aims at exploring and demonstrating what a network perspective can add to the understanding of manufacturing management and strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is built on principal reasoning of future manufacturing strategy. Articles and conference papers together with over 25 years of field studies constitute the empirical base. An industry was chosen to demonstrate the application of the research framework of horizontal and vertical technologies.

Findings

The analysis indicates that manufacturing occurs within open‐production systems here called extraprises as an extension to enterprises with their inside the firm focus. Taking a network perspective, it is suggested that a conceptual framework of horizontal and vertical technologies offers a fruitful conceptualization to identify the content and meaning of future manufacturing strategy.

Research implications/implications

The network theory conceptualization takes the view of manufacturing systems a further step beyond systems theory and contributes a richer framework for manufacturing strategy research.

Originality/value

It is argued that future directions of manufacturing strategy will gain from taking a network perspective using network theory with its foundations in actors, resources, and activities.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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